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Unethical Behavior

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OPINION
October 3, 2005
Re "DeLay Helped Cement GOP Ties to Lobbyists," Sept. 30 If you look at the last century's American political scandals, you have to conclude that nobody does corruption like the Republicans when they gain power. The Democrats do their best to keep up, but they never really come close to being as sleazy. People forget how awful the scandals of both Reagan's and Nixon's second terms were. Whatever makes them do it, for some reason sooner or later the GOP raincoat always pops open and we get flashed.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
December 11, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Police arrested the top official in the Cayman Islands on Tuesday morning on suspicion of corruption, including abuse of office, theft and conflict of interest, the latest chapter in an ongoing investigation in the British territory famed as both a tax haven and a Caribbean idyll. Premier McKeeva Bush, 57, was taken into custody at his home on Grand Cayman island, the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service said in a brief statement. The Cayman Islands premier was detained “in connection with a number of ongoing police investigations,” it said, including allegations tied to misusing a government credit card and importing explosive substances without the proper permits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
To reverse the common saying: Television taketh away, and television giveth. An example of this odd logic is ABC News' latest edition in its "Burning Questions" series, "Lying, Cheating and Stealing in America" (tonight at 10 on Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42). Item upon item is served up by Sam Donaldson and crew to provide evidence of "the epidemic" of unethical behavior in contemporary America. With each bit of evidence, though, there's a curiously similar culprit. Sports is getting corrupted, and it's largely due, we're told, to the big ad revenue bucks that TV brings in to the NCAA and the pro teams.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Transportation Security Administration is firing eight federal air marshals for drinking on the job, and suspending six more for failing to report the incident. The 14 marshals, who work out of the New York field office, were notified Friday and asked to turn in their weapons and credentials, TSA officials said. One probationary employee was terminated immediately. The rest can appeal. Federal air marshals are armed, nonuniformed officers who fly on commercial flights to protect travelers.
SCIENCE
February 27, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The rich really are different from the rest of us, scientists have found — they are more apt to commit unethical acts because they are more motivated by greed. People driving expensive cars were more likely than other motorists to cut off drivers and pedestrians at a four-way-stop intersection in the San Francisco Bay Area, UC Berkeley researchers observed. Those findings led to a series of experiments that revealed that people of higher socioeconomic status were also more likely to cheat to win a prize, take candy from children and say they would pocket extra change handed to them in error rather than give it back.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Transportation Security Administration is firing eight federal air marshals for drinking on the job, and suspending six more for failing to report the incident. The 14 marshals, who work out of the New York field office, were notified Friday and asked to turn in their weapons and credentials, TSA officials said. One probationary employee was terminated immediately. The rest can appeal. Federal air marshals are armed, nonuniformed officers who fly on commercial flights to protect travelers.
WORLD
December 11, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Police arrested the top official in the Cayman Islands on Tuesday morning on suspicion of corruption, including abuse of office, theft and conflict of interest, the latest chapter in an ongoing investigation in the British territory famed as both a tax haven and a Caribbean idyll. Premier McKeeva Bush, 57, was taken into custody at his home on Grand Cayman island, the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service said in a brief statement. The Cayman Islands premier was detained “in connection with a number of ongoing police investigations,” it said, including allegations tied to misusing a government credit card and importing explosive substances without the proper permits.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
More employees than ever before turned whistleblower against unethical behavior last year, but they also suffered the highest amount of backlash in history from their bosses. Nearly half of all workers witnessed some sort of misconduct, according to a report from research group Ethics Resource Center . Of those, 65% reported the wrongdoing - a record number. Also at an all-time high: the 22% of whistleblowers who said their companies struck back at them for spilling the beans.  Companies tend to act differently in uncertain economic times, taking more risks as the business environment improves, according to the ERC. More than four in 10 survey participants said their businesses have a weak ethical culture - the highest percentage in a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001
Re "Garofalo Wants City to Pay His Legal Fees," June 3: Neither Huntington Beach City Councilman Dave Garofalo nor his attorney seems to have a passing acquaintance with basic ethical concepts. Conducting oneself ethically includes avoiding all that might give even the appearance of conflict. To claim that he did not actually profit from his conduct is no defense whatsoever. His attorney asks where we will get public service candidates when they see what "happened" to his client, that is, being held accountable for unethical behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1991
I am appalled by the brutal beating of King. I am also appalled by The Times' swift editorial plea for Gates to resign. If we are to assume that Gates' management brought on this violent act and that the individuals involved were not independently responsible, then we must assume that Mayor Tom Bradley should also resign because of the climate of continuing unethical behavior of his appointees. Certainly leaders of this community seem to have different sets of values in this situation.
SCIENCE
February 27, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The rich really are different from the rest of us, scientists have found — they are more apt to commit unethical acts because they are more motivated by greed. People driving expensive cars were more likely than other motorists to cut off drivers and pedestrians at a four-way-stop intersection in the San Francisco Bay Area, UC Berkeley researchers observed. Those findings led to a series of experiments that revealed that people of higher socioeconomic status were also more likely to cheat to win a prize, take candy from children and say they would pocket extra change handed to them in error rather than give it back.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
More employees than ever before turned whistleblower against unethical behavior last year, but they also suffered the highest amount of backlash in history from their bosses. Nearly half of all workers witnessed some sort of misconduct, according to a report from research group Ethics Resource Center . Of those, 65% reported the wrongdoing - a record number. Also at an all-time high: the 22% of whistleblowers who said their companies struck back at them for spilling the beans.  Companies tend to act differently in uncertain economic times, taking more risks as the business environment improves, according to the ERC. More than four in 10 survey participants said their businesses have a weak ethical culture - the highest percentage in a decade.
OPINION
March 31, 2009
Re "State consumer chief quits amid cost questions," March 28 Which criminal is more blatant, the one who burglarizes in broad daylight or the public official who fleeces the taxpayer under the cover of "expenses"? Carrie Lopez, the now-resigned director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs, should be facing criminal charges for stealing. This sort of behavior only escalates when there are no consequences for unethical behavior. Keep digging, Times, until you have unearthed every one of these officials who find it so easy to dip into the public trough to satisfy their greed.
OPINION
October 3, 2005
Re "DeLay Helped Cement GOP Ties to Lobbyists," Sept. 30 If you look at the last century's American political scandals, you have to conclude that nobody does corruption like the Republicans when they gain power. The Democrats do their best to keep up, but they never really come close to being as sleazy. People forget how awful the scandals of both Reagan's and Nixon's second terms were. Whatever makes them do it, for some reason sooner or later the GOP raincoat always pops open and we get flashed.
OPINION
August 16, 2002
I am glad someone is addressing the interests of those who must relinquish their trial rights in order to obtain employment or to receive medical or other essential services ("The Justice-at-a-Price Guys Take Aim at Arbitration," Commentary, Aug. 13). Representing myself in an employment-related arbitration was disastrous: The arbitrator clearly was biased in favor of the employer, who by law was solely responsible for paying his extravagant fee and who also probably can be counted on to provide repeat business--as long as the employer receives favorable treatment in such proceedings.
OPINION
June 1, 2002
As a writer with a law degree who has done extensive research on the failure of medical insurance companies to reimburse doctors, I sympathize with the backers of legislation that would make it harder for insurance companies to bounce claims back and forth and leave them unpaid ("HMOs to Face Payment Pressure," May 26). However, legislation preventing such behavior already is on the books in California, including the requirement of prompt handling of claims. These laws routinely are ignored by insurance companies, which manipulated the federal government into passing legislation that deprives doctors and patients of the ability to hit these companies in the pocketbook with lawsuits for breach of contract and fraud.
OPINION
March 31, 2009
Re "State consumer chief quits amid cost questions," March 28 Which criminal is more blatant, the one who burglarizes in broad daylight or the public official who fleeces the taxpayer under the cover of "expenses"? Carrie Lopez, the now-resigned director of the California Department of Consumer Affairs, should be facing criminal charges for stealing. This sort of behavior only escalates when there are no consequences for unethical behavior. Keep digging, Times, until you have unearthed every one of these officials who find it so easy to dip into the public trough to satisfy their greed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1988
Let me be sure I have this straight. A professor at a California State University, an acting department head no less, offers to sell A's to his students in exchange for their selling $100 worth of raffle tickets for a charitable organization that has never been charitable to anyone but the caterers who arranged the charity dinners, and the professor is not jailed, he is not fired, he is not even put on probation, and the only consequences of this...
NEWS
August 18, 2001 | DAVID SHAW and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter Bart, long one of the most powerful and controversial figures in Hollywood, was suspended Friday from his job as editor in chief of Variety, the dominant trade paper in the entertainment industry, pending an investigation of charges that he has behaved unethically and frequently used racist, sexist and anti-gay language.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001
Re "Garofalo Wants City to Pay His Legal Fees," June 3: Neither Huntington Beach City Councilman Dave Garofalo nor his attorney seems to have a passing acquaintance with basic ethical concepts. Conducting oneself ethically includes avoiding all that might give even the appearance of conflict. To claim that he did not actually profit from his conduct is no defense whatsoever. His attorney asks where we will get public service candidates when they see what "happened" to his client, that is, being held accountable for unethical behavior.
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