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Unexplained Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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NEWS
June 22, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Eight cases of unexplained respiratory distress syndrome reported last week by the California Department of Health Services are apparently not connected to the outbreak of a similar flu-like illness in Arizona and New Mexico, state authorities said Monday. Blood samples from the first three patients tested by the U.S.
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NEWS
August 17, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The unexpected epidemic of a mysterious flu-like disease that struck the Southwest this summer was no surprise to virologists. For years they have warned that humanity's increasing encroachment on nature will eventually unleash on the United States and other developed nations exotic diseases previously confined to poverty-ridden Third World countries.
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NEWS
June 3, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Health authorities said Wednesday that the epidemic of a mysterious flu-like disease that has terrified Arizona and New Mexico residents may have peaked, with no new deaths or cases of life-threatening respiratory distress reported since Saturday. "I personally find it very encouraging," said Dr. Gary Simpson, chief of infectious diseases for the New Mexico Department of Health.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Two new deaths attributed to the mysterious "Four Corners disease" have been identified in Oregon and Louisiana, the latter ominously caused by a new strain of virus carried by a different rodent, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. The new cases suggest that the disease could exist elsewhere in the country and that much of the western and southern United States may be at risk.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Federal researchers confirmed Thursday that the mysterious flu-like illness that has killed 12 people in the Southwest is caused by a virus transmitted through rat droppings, but they said the virus is probably a new strain that has not been seen before. Its detection illustrates the potential for the emergence of deadly new infectious agents, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The mystery illness that has stricken the Four Corners area of New Mexico and Arizona may be caused by a virus carried by rodents and transmitted in rodent droppings and urine, New Mexico authorities said Friday.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Two new deaths attributed to the mysterious "Four Corners disease" have been identified in Oregon and Louisiana, the latter ominously caused by a new strain of virus carried by a different rodent, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. The new cases suggest that the disease could exist elsewhere in the country and that much of the western and southern United States may be at risk.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California health officials have investigated the unexplained deaths of two Humboldt State University undergraduates and a severe respiratory illness that struck a third student, but say they have found no link to an outbreak of a mysterious fatal disease in Arizona and New Mexico.
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
New Mexico authorities said Monday that they have observed no new cases in the last 24 hours of the mystery illness that has brought fear to the Four Corners area of northern Arizona and New Mexico. But the death toll from the flu-like disease has risen to 11 as researchers have ferreted out an earlier case that matches criteria established for the disorder, now known as unexplained respiratory distress syndrome, or URDS. Researchers from New Mexico and the U.S.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | DAVID FREED and MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A UC San Diego graduate student who worked and lived in a nature reserve here may have died as a result of a mystery flu-like illness suspected of killing 29 people in the Four Corners area of the desert Southwest, authorities said Saturday. State and federal medical experts began arriving Saturday in Mammoth Lakes in the Eastern Sierra to investigate whether Jeanne Messier, 27, was the first California case of the deadly disease. The U.S.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | DAVID FREED and MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A UC San Diego graduate student who worked and lived in a nature reserve here may have died as a result of a mystery flu-like illness suspected of killing 29 people in the Four Corners area of the desert Southwest, authorities said Saturday. State and federal medical experts began arriving Saturday in Mammoth Lakes in the Eastern Sierra to investigate whether Jeanne Messier, 27, was the first California case of the deadly disease. The U.S.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The flu-like mystery illness that has plagued the Four Corners area of the Southwest is spreading outside the region, with new cases reported in Nevada and Texas, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. The disease, which has now been linked to a hantavirus carried by the deer mouse, also continues to show up in new cases in the Four Corners region, according to the agency's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | Associated Press
A Round Mountain homemaker said Tuesday that a mouse that was caught and killed by her cats was the apparent source of the hantavirus infection, Nevada's first case, that nearly killed her. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta confirmed that the Round Mountain hantavirus case was the nation's 46th and only the third outside the Four Corners region of New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado and Utah, where 26 people have died of the disease.
NEWS
June 22, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Eight cases of unexplained respiratory distress syndrome reported last week by the California Department of Health Services are apparently not connected to the outbreak of a similar flu-like illness in Arizona and New Mexico, state authorities said Monday. Blood samples from the first three patients tested by the U.S.
NEWS
June 22, 1993 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On the shoulder of the rutted dirt road that leads to Littlewater, a few hundred feet from where it branches off the main highway, someone has planted a large hand-painted sign. It reads: "No News Media Allowed--TV, Radio, Etc." Here on the wind-swept eastern edge of the Navajo reservation, state and federal health investigators, newspaper reporters and network camera crews have been knocking on doors at isolated homes asking questions.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | Associated Press
Health officials say there are up to five unconfirmed Northern California victims of the mystery illness that has caused up to 16 deaths in the Four Corners region of the Southwest. Two of the possible victims being investigated by the state Department of Health were hospitalized in Northern California and on ventilators. Of the other three reported by the San Francisco Department of Public Health, two had died and one is missing.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The unexpected epidemic of a mysterious flu-like disease that struck the Southwest this summer was no surprise to virologists. For years they have warned that humanity's increasing encroachment on nature will eventually unleash on the United States and other developed nations exotic diseases previously confined to poverty-ridden Third World countries.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | Associated Press
Health officials say there are up to five unconfirmed Northern California victims of the mystery illness that has caused up to 16 deaths in the Four Corners region of the Southwest. Two of the possible victims being investigated by the state Department of Health were hospitalized in Northern California and on ventilators. Of the other three reported by the San Francisco Department of Public Health, two had died and one is missing.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Federal researchers confirmed Thursday that the mysterious flu-like illness that has killed 12 people in the Southwest is caused by a virus transmitted through rat droppings, but they said the virus is probably a new strain that has not been seen before. Its detection illustrates the potential for the emergence of deadly new infectious agents, according to a report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
NEWS
June 5, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The mystery illness that has stricken the Four Corners area of New Mexico and Arizona may be caused by a virus carried by rodents and transmitted in rodent droppings and urine, New Mexico authorities said Friday.
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