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WORLD
July 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
About 5,400 residents were evacuated in Osaka, Japan, and flights at nearby airports were rerouted as army experts disposed of a large unexploded bomb believed to have been dropped by the U.S. military during World War II, authorities said. The 1-ton bomb, about 6 feet long, was found by workers at a construction site last month, local army spokesman Shoji Matsumoto said. Although the war ended more than 60 years ago, unexploded bombs still turn up regularly in Japan, where U.S. forces conducted extensive air raids against major cities.
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WORLD
February 18, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Five tons of unexploded Israeli bombs stored in the Gaza Strip under Hamas police guard are missing and believed stolen, U.N. spokesman Richard Miron said. He said a U.N. disposal team had intended to disarm them. The bombs were dropped during Israel's Gaza offensive that ended last month, another United Nations official said. Israeli military spokesman Peter Lerner said the explosives were probably taken by Hamas to another location. Hamas officials said they had no knowledge of the matter.
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NATIONAL
February 10, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A federal contractor plans to begin searching next month for unexploded munitions thought to be spread across 14,000 acres of East Texas. That land, now privately owned, was once part of a World War II infantry training center called Camp Fannin. Officials say the cleanup by Zapata Inc. could find small-arms ammunition, mines, grenades, rockets and mortars -- all used when Camp Fannin was an active military facility from 1943 to 1946. The camp was returned to private landowners when it was deemed unnecessary after World War II, leaving unexploded ordnance across the area.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A federal contractor plans to begin searching next month for unexploded munitions thought to be spread across 14,000 acres of East Texas. That land, now privately owned, was once part of a World War II infantry training center called Camp Fannin. Officials say the cleanup by Zapata Inc. could find small-arms ammunition, mines, grenades, rockets and mortars -- all used when Camp Fannin was an active military facility from 1943 to 1946. The camp was returned to private landowners when it was deemed unnecessary after World War II, leaving unexploded ordnance across the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1985
The motive for a pipe bomb explosion that shattered a window in an empty classroom at Agoura High School late Friday or early Saturday appeared to be vandalism, a Sheriff's Department spokesman said Sunday. A second pipe bomb was found Saturday unexploded in an open locker at the school, the spokesman said. No one was injured in the blast, which caused an estimated $100 in damage. The bombs were discovered about 12:30 p.m.
WORLD
February 18, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Five tons of unexploded Israeli bombs stored in the Gaza Strip under Hamas police guard are missing and believed stolen, U.N. spokesman Richard Miron said. He said a U.N. disposal team had intended to disarm them. The bombs were dropped during Israel's Gaza offensive that ended last month, another United Nations official said. Israeli military spokesman Peter Lerner said the explosives were probably taken by Hamas to another location. Hamas officials said they had no knowledge of the matter.
NEWS
June 19, 1989 | From Times wire services
A bomb exploded outside the living quarters of a British military barracks today, causing extensive damage but no injuries, a military spokesman said. No one immediately claimed responsibility, but West German authorities said they suspected the Irish Republican Army was responsible. The two attackers fled after they were surprised by a West German employee at the barracks. The employee was hit in the face and investigators later found four more unexploded bombs containing plastic explosives at the barracks, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1989 | MARICARMEN EROLES, Times Staff Writer
In another effort to rid a Tierrasanta neighborhood of decades-old and potentially hazardous explosives, the Navy today will begin a new sweep, officials said Monday. The so-called interim survey will last through the first week of August and precedes a more comprehensive cleanup scheduled for next spring. The 2,600-acre Tierrasanta neighborhood is built on part of what was once Camp Elliott, a World War II Marine Corps training base where artillery, tank, mortar and small arms were used.
OPINION
April 25, 2003
Re "Bombing Ends but Not Danger," April 22: The Bush administration never ceases to amaze me with its ability to shock and awe. Gen. Richard Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, claimed that he had "not heard of injuries" from the cluster bombs dropped by U.S. planes. Further, he could not say whether these bombs had landed in residential areas. The American press has documented hundreds of cases of injuries from these bombs in residential areas. This article contains gut-wrenching photos and stories of children maimed by these horrible weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1995 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An El Toro-based Marine was killed Tuesday by an exploding grenade as he cleared munitions from a firing range near the Marine Corps base at Twentynine Palms, officials said. The Marine, who was not named pending notification of family, was part of a team of ordnance technicians searching out unexploded munitions on the range after a recent training exercise, Marine officials said. He was a member of the Marine Wing Support Squadron 373 based at El Toro.
WORLD
July 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
About 5,400 residents were evacuated in Osaka, Japan, and flights at nearby airports were rerouted as army experts disposed of a large unexploded bomb believed to have been dropped by the U.S. military during World War II, authorities said. The 1-ton bomb, about 6 feet long, was found by workers at a construction site last month, local army spokesman Shoji Matsumoto said. Although the war ended more than 60 years ago, unexploded bombs still turn up regularly in Japan, where U.S. forces conducted extensive air raids against major cities.
WORLD
October 8, 2007 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
He is a shy boy, wincing from the stabbing pain of jagged shrapnel in his leg, a casualty of a war that ended 25 years before he was born. His name is To and he is 7, too young to understand why a weapon brought halfway around the world lay hidden in the dirt behind his wooden house, waiting to explode. It happened on a cold morning in mid-February while To was huddling with about 10 people near a small fire his father had built.
NEWS
October 23, 2005 | Bob Moen, Associated Press Writer
Most of the signs for visitors to the Medicine Bow National Forest in southeast Wyoming are like those greeting people at most forests, with the requisite rules about camping, fires and vehicle use. But on a section of Medicine Bow between Cheyenne and Laramie, visitors see an additional sign -- warning them not to pick up metal objects that could be unexploded military ordnance. From 1879 until 1961, when the U.S.
WORLD
April 26, 2004 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
Scattered through this town near the old Demilitarized Zone, 2,000 red signs with skulls and crossbones warn, "Danger!! Mines!!" For many, the alert comes too late: 29 years after the war's end, the land still yields a harvest of death. "I'm OK with my situation now," says Do Thien Dang, 41, who lost both legs as a teenager when an unexploded U.S. artillery round went off while he was digging an irrigation ditch. "But every time my daughters go out, I tell them, 'Be careful.
NEWS
April 27, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Kurdish sappers scouring the countryside for thousands of unexploded U.S. cluster bombs search with wooden stakes, gut instinct and the help of any survivors who stumble upon the lethal weapons. It would be much faster and safer if the U.S. military provided details of where warplanes dropped cluster bombs in Iraq, but the only civilian agency clearing the devices has not yet been provided such information. U.S.
OPINION
April 25, 2003
Re "Bombing Ends but Not Danger," April 22: The Bush administration never ceases to amaze me with its ability to shock and awe. Gen. Richard Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, claimed that he had "not heard of injuries" from the cluster bombs dropped by U.S. planes. Further, he could not say whether these bombs had landed in residential areas. The American press has documented hundreds of cases of injuries from these bombs in residential areas. This article contains gut-wrenching photos and stories of children maimed by these horrible weapons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1992 | BLAINE HALLEY
Three nearly 50-year-old unexploded bombs found last month southeast of Rodgers dry lake bed, will be detonated about 11 a.m. Sunday, Edwards Air Force Base officials announced Friday. One of the weapons, a 500-pound gas bomb, may contain phosgene or cyanogen chloride, an Air Force spokesman said. The two others were 10-pound bombs.
NEWS
June 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
One of the top U.N. officials in Kosovo criticized NATO on Friday for its failure to reveal the location of cluster bombs that have killed or maimed hundreds during the last year. Dennis McNamara, the United Nations head of humanitarian assistance in Kosovo, said weapons-clearance experts are increasingly frustrated because they have insufficient information about the location of last year's NATO strikes to enable them to remove unexploded bombs.
NEWS
April 22, 2003 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Looking down as he walked toward home through a scrubby field on the edge of Baghdad, 11-year-old Amer Mahmoud spotted the small, reddish-brown cylinder on the ground just as his foot touched it. The bomblet exploded, leaving his left leg hanging by bloody shreds. He woke up hours later in a hospital, after an emergency amputation of his leg just below the knee. "Everything in my life has changed," said Amer, a brown-eyed boy so small and slight he looked closer to 7 or 8.
NEWS
January 5, 2002 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just minutes into the workday, the Explosive Ordnance Disposal team ran into its first perilous dilemma: The Afghan villagers wanted to keep their rocket. The 122-millimeter, Soviet-made white tube of high explosives was lying half inside the perimeter of the base here that U.S. forces control along with anti-Taliban fighters, and half in one of the numerous villages around the field. A dozen children were crowded around, poking it. A village elder said he wanted to keep it.
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