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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1992
Sherry Babitch Jeffe ("The Solution to California's Continuing Budget Woes," Opinion, Sept. 6) says that "Californians must consider restructuring the entire political system that drives its government and the governmental institutions that reflect the system." Perhaps one long-term change which we should consider is the exchange of our traditional two-house Legislature for the more straightforward one-house (unicameral) model. While such a change could not by itself solve the budgetary dilemma, it would help.
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OPINION
August 21, 2009 | Harold Meyerson, Harold Meyerson is editor at large of the American Prospect and an Op-Ed columnist for the Washington Post.
As the state that once embodied the American dream has devolved into an American nightmare, Californians have begun looking for ways to rescue their state from its own dysfunction. We are awash in constitutional proposals, some sensible (eliminating the Legislature's two-thirds-vote requirement for passing a budget or raising taxes; abolishing term limits), some not (enacting a flat tax). In this spirit of reinvention, then, permit me a few modest queries: Why in the world do we have a two-house Legislature?
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MAGAZINE
November 1, 1992
Perhaps Jones' feature will inspire a voter revolt to cut the cost of the state Legislature by 50%. How? By passing a proposition to replace the two houses in Sacramento with a unicameral legislature. PHILIP R. HARRIS La Jolla
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Searching for ways to shake up California's creaky structure of government, a state commission proposed Friday that the state junk its traditional two-house Legislature in favor of a one-body unicameral state Senate with 121 members. The unicameral proposal was just one of a host of dramatic changes in state and local government and the public school system, endorsed in concept by the 23-member Constitution Revision Commission. Potentially, the most far-reaching proposal would allow voters to create new types of local super-governments formed through merging cities, counties, schools and special districts.
OPINION
August 21, 2009 | Harold Meyerson, Harold Meyerson is editor at large of the American Prospect and an Op-Ed columnist for the Washington Post.
As the state that once embodied the American dream has devolved into an American nightmare, Californians have begun looking for ways to rescue their state from its own dysfunction. We are awash in constitutional proposals, some sensible (eliminating the Legislature's two-thirds-vote requirement for passing a budget or raising taxes; abolishing term limits), some not (enacting a flat tax). In this spirit of reinvention, then, permit me a few modest queries: Why in the world do we have a two-house Legislature?
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Searching for ways to shake up California's creaky structure of government, a state commission proposed Friday that the state junk its traditional two-house Legislature in favor of a one-body unicameral state Senate with 121 members. The unicameral proposal was just one of a host of dramatic changes in state and local government and the public school system, endorsed in concept by the 23-member Constitution Revision Commission. Potentially, the most far-reaching proposal would allow voters to create new types of local super-governments formed through merging cities, counties, schools and special districts.
NEWS
March 10, 1985
The California Legislature costs $135.7 million annually. A unicameral legislature, such as in Nebraska, could effect a saving of $45 million to $50 million, as a conservative estimate. Thanks for the excellent story by Charles Hillinger ("The Cornhusker State Put Its House in Order," Feb. 17). As a former Nebraska lobbyist, I can confirm all the values of the one-house legislature, which he describes. After nearly 50 years, Nebraska would not think of returning to the old two-house legislature.
NEWS
November 5, 1986 | Associated Press
Republican Joseph Ada defeated incumbent Democrat Ricardo J. Bordallo, who faces trial on bribery and extortion charges, in Tuesday's gubernatorial election. With all 75 of this Pacific island's precincts reporting, Ada, a senator in the U.S. territory's unicameral legislature, unofficially had 54% of the votes cast. In the race for the island's delegate to the U.S. House, incumbent Republican Ben Blaz defeated Democrat Frank C. Torres Jr. "You wanted a change . . .
NEWS
April 8, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Lucy Killea believes she has seen the future and it is in Nebraska. The San Diego Democrat paid a recent visit to the Cornhusker state's unicameral Legislature, composed of one house instead of the traditional two. And now Killea, convinced the one-stop lawmaking process makes for better government, is beating the drum for California to do likewise by replacing its Assembly and Senate with a single, 120-member Legislature. It would be a drastic step, for sure, says Killea.
NEWS
July 22, 2001 | From Associated Press
Jailed former spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos told an anti-corruption judge that he followed direct orders from former President Alberto Fujimori when he allegedly bribed at least 10 lawmakers, Peru's Congress said Saturday. Congress released a sworn statement Montesinos made to Judge Saul Pena Farfan, in which Montesinos said he doled out tens of thousands of dollars, "following orders from President Fujimori to obtain a congressional majority."
MAGAZINE
November 1, 1992
Perhaps Jones' feature will inspire a voter revolt to cut the cost of the state Legislature by 50%. How? By passing a proposition to replace the two houses in Sacramento with a unicameral legislature. PHILIP R. HARRIS La Jolla
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1992
Sherry Babitch Jeffe ("The Solution to California's Continuing Budget Woes," Opinion, Sept. 6) says that "Californians must consider restructuring the entire political system that drives its government and the governmental institutions that reflect the system." Perhaps one long-term change which we should consider is the exchange of our traditional two-house Legislature for the more straightforward one-house (unicameral) model. While such a change could not by itself solve the budgetary dilemma, it would help.
NEWS
March 10, 1985
The California Legislature costs $135.7 million annually. A unicameral legislature, such as in Nebraska, could effect a saving of $45 million to $50 million, as a conservative estimate. Thanks for the excellent story by Charles Hillinger ("The Cornhusker State Put Its House in Order," Feb. 17). As a former Nebraska lobbyist, I can confirm all the values of the one-house legislature, which he describes. After nearly 50 years, Nebraska would not think of returning to the old two-house legislature.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | From Associated Press
Gov. Ben Nelson on Wednesday signed legislation requiring that, in most cases, a parent be notified before a girl 17 or younger may undergo abortion. Nelson, a Democrat, said that signing the bill fulfilled a campaign promise that he would approve an abortion law "if I agreed with it." The nonpartisan, unicameral Legislature passed the bill, 32 to 12, on Tuesday, after years of wrangling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1993 | Jerry Gillam, Times staff writer
A Senate committee has approved legislation making it a crime for a physician to have sexual relations with a patient. A 9-0 vote sent the bill (SB 743) by Sen. Daniel E. Boatwright (D-Concord) from the Business and Professions Committee to the Appropriations Committee for more screening. The measure would make the first act of sexual relations punishable as a misdemeanor and subsequent acts punishable as either misdemeanors or felonies.
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