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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1985
I want to congratulate The Times on its excellent coverage of the announcement of UNICEF's "State of the World's Children: '86" (This is front page news!) and the accompanying editorial, "Investing in the World's Children." Your headlines send the true message that, more than ever before, ending hunger, malnutrition, and disease is not only possible, but is being accomplished. Praises to you for emphasizing the incredible work that is being done in saving thousands of lives. The number of deaths which occurred in the Bhopal tragedy occur every day in India alone from just three diseases.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 28, 2009 | By Robyn Dixon
The man grabs a metal bar, raises it and shouts at several boys playing on a see-saw. The boys' faces freeze in fear. They flee. This is a "child-friendly space." The man is a respected community leader. And the iron bar -- or stick, fist or broom handle -- is child discipline here in Andohatapenaka 2, one of the poorest districts of Madagascar's capital. The man, Honore Rakotomanana, 54, doesn't work at the center, funded and run by UNICEF. He just dropped in. But his is a typical attitude.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1996
Re "Child Labor on the Rise, UNICEF Says," Dec. 12: UNICEF's State of the World's Children 1997 report reminds us once again of the appalling conditions suffered by millions of children laboring around the world. What happens to children, especially girls, who are sold to labor contractors (ostensibly to work in factories) in order for their parents to afford food is unfit to print in a family newspaper. Although poverty is a primary cause of child labor, effective actions can be taken in the near term.
NEWS
November 13, 2005 | William J. Kole, Associated Press Writer
Instead of iron cots and squalor, there are plush toys and pillows in primary colors. Walls once decorated with photos of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu are now plastered with posters of pop star Kylie Minogue. But the government facility still serves a purpose born of the communist era: It's a repository for the unwanted: mentally disabled children whose parents are too poor, too unwilling or too ashamed to care for them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1993
Childhood should be carefree, a time of joy and innocence. But for millions of youngsters around the world, it is a time of malnutrition, poverty, illiteracy and sickness. A fifth of the world's families live in absolute poverty, according to the U.N. Children's Fund "State of the World" report. Even in the comparatively affluent United States, 20% of all children live below the poverty line. Through no fault of their own, these youngsters suffer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1999
Re "U.S. Nearing Key Juncture in Iraq Policy," Aug. 29: If the UNICEF report states that child mortality rates have doubled in Iraq since sanctions were first imposed and that Baghdad and the sanctions should share the blame, please inform the readers that the death rate for children under 5 years of age is approximately 5,000 every month. To leave this statistic out is unconscionable. When are you going to report the killing of a nation? R.J. PISAPIA Westlake Village
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1993
Every year about this time UNICEF publishes its State of the World's Children Report, a publication that outlines our achievements and our work yet-to-be done to eliminate child poverty, hunger and deaths. Currently, 35,000 children die needlessly every single day, primarily from hunger and hunger-related disease. One-fifth of the world's population lives in absolute poverty and billions of children are born into a life of suffering. The UNICEF report shines a bright ray of hope and possibility for their future, outlining feasible solutions to ending this misery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1987
In this year awash with negative economic news, it is worth noting that there are positive international developments worth celebrating. In addition to recent U.S.-Soviet talks we can take encouragement from the UNICEF report. It makes the following points: --Ten years ago fewer than 5% of the developing world's children were vaccinated against disease. If present trends continue, more than 70% of these children will be immunized against main vaccine preventable disease by 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1989
Conrad's moving cartoon of the starving Third World child in the manger evokes Jesus' statement that those who feed the least of his brothers do it for him (Dec. 22). Response to the recent Armenian earthquake shows that people do care about others who are suffering in distant places, so why do children continue to die of starvation? First, the crisis is a continuing one that does not make for headlines in the papers and dramatic pictures on the evening news--except at times of extreme suffering such as the Ethiopian famine a couple of years ago. But more important is the magnitude of the suffering according to the UNICEF report on the state of the world's children, many more children die each week, every week, than died in Armenia.
WORLD
November 28, 2009 | By Robyn Dixon
The man grabs a metal bar, raises it and shouts at several boys playing on a see-saw. The boys' faces freeze in fear. They flee. This is a "child-friendly space." The man is a respected community leader. And the iron bar -- or stick, fist or broom handle -- is child discipline here in Andohatapenaka 2, one of the poorest districts of Madagascar's capital. The man, Honore Rakotomanana, 54, doesn't work at the center, funded and run by UNICEF. He just dropped in. But his is a typical attitude.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1999
Re "U.S. Nearing Key Juncture in Iraq Policy," Aug. 29: If the UNICEF report states that child mortality rates have doubled in Iraq since sanctions were first imposed and that Baghdad and the sanctions should share the blame, please inform the readers that the death rate for children under 5 years of age is approximately 5,000 every month. To leave this statistic out is unconscionable. When are you going to report the killing of a nation? R.J. PISAPIA Westlake Village
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1996
Re "Child Labor on the Rise, UNICEF Says," Dec. 12: UNICEF's State of the World's Children 1997 report reminds us once again of the appalling conditions suffered by millions of children laboring around the world. What happens to children, especially girls, who are sold to labor contractors (ostensibly to work in factories) in order for their parents to afford food is unfit to print in a family newspaper. Although poverty is a primary cause of child labor, effective actions can be taken in the near term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1993
Childhood should be carefree, a time of joy and innocence. But for millions of youngsters around the world, it is a time of malnutrition, poverty, illiteracy and sickness. A fifth of the world's families live in absolute poverty, according to the U.N. Children's Fund "State of the World" report. Even in the comparatively affluent United States, 20% of all children live below the poverty line. Through no fault of their own, these youngsters suffer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1993
Every year about this time UNICEF publishes its State of the World's Children Report, a publication that outlines our achievements and our work yet-to-be done to eliminate child poverty, hunger and deaths. Currently, 35,000 children die needlessly every single day, primarily from hunger and hunger-related disease. One-fifth of the world's population lives in absolute poverty and billions of children are born into a life of suffering. The UNICEF report shines a bright ray of hope and possibility for their future, outlining feasible solutions to ending this misery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1990 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's children may be healthier and better educated than others worldwide, but like the others, they are becoming increasingly deprived of adequate care, housing and family stability, according to local child advocates. The experts gathered Wednesday to comment on UNICEF's 1991 State of the World's Children report, released simultaneously in New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1989
Conrad's moving cartoon of the starving Third World child in the manger evokes Jesus' statement that those who feed the least of his brothers do it for him (Dec. 22). Response to the recent Armenian earthquake shows that people do care about others who are suffering in distant places, so why do children continue to die of starvation? First, the crisis is a continuing one that does not make for headlines in the papers and dramatic pictures on the evening news--except at times of extreme suffering such as the Ethiopian famine a couple of years ago. But more important is the magnitude of the suffering according to the UNICEF report on the state of the world's children, many more children die each week, every week, than died in Armenia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1987
In this year awash with negative economic news, it is worth noting that there are positive international developments worth celebrating. In addition to recent U.S.-Soviet talks we can take encouragement from the UNICEF report. It makes the following points: --Ten years ago fewer than 5% of the developing world's children were vaccinated against disease. If present trends continue, more than 70% of these children will be immunized against main vaccine preventable disease by 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1985
I want to congratulate The Times on its excellent coverage of the announcement of UNICEF's "State of the World's Children: '86" (This is front page news!) and the accompanying editorial, "Investing in the World's Children." Your headlines send the true message that, more than ever before, ending hunger, malnutrition, and disease is not only possible, but is being accomplished. Praises to you for emphasizing the incredible work that is being done in saving thousands of lives. The number of deaths which occurred in the Bhopal tragedy occur every day in India alone from just three diseases.
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