Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnicorn
IN THE NEWS

Unicorn

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By Ed Park
"Why should you worry if he grows or not, Joe?" says Mr. Kandinsky, the old East End tailor in Wolf Mankowitz's 1953 novel "A Kid for Two Farthings" (Bloomsbury: 128 pp., $14 paper), to his 6-year-old charge. "Take everything for what it is; don't try to improve it, Joe. A chicken is a chicken. A man is a man. A little unicorn is a little unicorn. It's enough." Though the unicorn in question is most likely a sickly goat with one nubbin of a horn -- whom Joe discovered at an animal market alongside dog-sellers and someone known as the Eel King -- Mr. Kandinsky doesn't shatter the story the boy has spun around the creature.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Susan Denley
When Sasha Obama wore an Asos sweater emblazoned with a unicorn to a basketball game last weekend, the garment promptly sold out. But supply seems to follow demand: Asos announced on its blog that the sweater will be back in stock Dec. 2. [Racked] Fashion maven Sarah Jessica Parker has joined Instagram. [People] One surprising factlet about President John F. Kennedy: He knew a designer dress when he saw one. That's according to a taped interview Princess Grace of Monaco gave  in 1965, recounting her surprise when the president correctly identified the outfit she was wearing as a Givenchy.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 22, 2013 | By Susan Denley
When Sasha Obama wore an Asos sweater emblazoned with a unicorn to a basketball game last weekend, the garment promptly sold out. But supply seems to follow demand: Asos announced on its blog that the sweater will be back in stock Dec. 2. [Racked] Fashion maven Sarah Jessica Parker has joined Instagram. [People] One surprising factlet about President John F. Kennedy: He knew a designer dress when he saw one. That's according to a taped interview Princess Grace of Monaco gave  in 1965, recounting her surprise when the president correctly identified the outfit she was wearing as a Givenchy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013
What Floats in a Moat? Lynne Berry. Illustrations by Matthew Cordell. Simon & Schuster, $17.99, ages 5-9 An eccentric goat and a chicken must deliver barrels of buttermilk to the queen, but a castle moat stands in their way. A little innovative thinking, mixed with science and persistence, adds to the shenanigans. (July) Jazzy in the Jungle Lucy Cousins Candlewick, $14.99, ages 2-5 Tropical colored die-cut illustrations and liftable flaps entice readers' interaction with a mama lemur as she searches through the jungle for her child, Jazzy, encountering an exotic array of critters along the way. (August)
BUSINESS
October 27, 2011 | By Ben Fritz and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
It has already had star-studded, red-carpet premieres in three major cities. It's being promoted everywhere from Gap stores to McDonald's to the side of trains. And, early ticket sales indicate it could enjoy a big opening. Yet, American audiences won't see Steven Spielberg's much-hyped family movie until Christmas. The director's big-budget 3-D animated movie "The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn," produced by Peter Jackson, is opening this weekend in Europe — nearly two months before it opens in this country.
MAGAZINE
October 18, 1992
When "Blade Runner" was revived last year, we were told it was the director's cut, "what Ridley Scott envisioned before studio heads began hacking away at his masterpiece." Now that the film has been revived once again, we're being told that no, this is the director's cut. And what is the difference between the 1991 and 1992 versions? The whole thing boils down to the inclusion, near the end, of a "unicorn scene," something Scott had treasured from the beginning and about which he's apparently been brooding for the past decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1991
More than 100 sheriff's deputies spent Saturday knocking on doors in Altadena seeking information about an 11-year-old girl who failed to return home from school, authorities said. Christina Basowa was last seen at about 3:30 p.m. Friday at the corner of Sinola Avenue and New York Drive, where a school bus delivered her and several classmates from Andrew Jackson Elementary School, Sheriff's Deputy Hal Grant said.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013
What Floats in a Moat? Lynne Berry. Illustrations by Matthew Cordell. Simon & Schuster, $17.99, ages 5-9 An eccentric goat and a chicken must deliver barrels of buttermilk to the queen, but a castle moat stands in their way. A little innovative thinking, mixed with science and persistence, adds to the shenanigans. (July) Jazzy in the Jungle Lucy Cousins Candlewick, $14.99, ages 2-5 Tropical colored die-cut illustrations and liftable flaps entice readers' interaction with a mama lemur as she searches through the jungle for her child, Jazzy, encountering an exotic array of critters along the way. (August)
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | DON BEMAN, Associated Press
Police officers removed a steamer trunk from the apartment of Philadelphia's star flower child 10 years ago, and the world created by the so-called "Unicorn" began to wither. The trunk contained the remains of Helen Maddux, a blonde former cheerleader known as Holly, Ira Einhorn's lover. She had been missing for 18 months by the time private investigators hired by her family in Tyler, Tex., pieced together enough information to point an accusing finger at Einhorn, until then a living symbol of nonviolence with incredible personal charm and a nimble intelligence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1998 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
It would be impossible to overstate how serious this is and how fast this is moving. --Dan Rather, commenting on impeachment on "The CBS Evening News" * It's time for television to step in. What is Christmas if not an excuse to indulge in happy endings? The spirit even crept into Tuesday night's somber "NYPD Blue," an explosive hour of the ABC series whose volcanic seething erupted when Det. Andy Sipowicz and his boss, Lt. Arthur Fancy, bloodied each other in a fistfight.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2011 | By Ben Fritz and Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
It has already had star-studded, red-carpet premieres in three major cities. It's being promoted everywhere from Gap stores to McDonald's to the side of trains. And, early ticket sales indicate it could enjoy a big opening. Yet, American audiences won't see Steven Spielberg's much-hyped family movie until Christmas. The director's big-budget 3-D animated movie "The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn," produced by Peter Jackson, is opening this weekend in Europe — nearly two months before it opens in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Nicole Borgenicht
Churbin, a tall jet-black stallion stood by the fence and whinnied. He had gotten his name from a little girl called Sally. She thought he looked like a cherub. Her dad said, " 'Churbin' sounds masculine. That's what we'll name him!" But now, Churbin was alone. He circled the corral, whinnied, listened and waited. He had not eaten in days and he felt like crying. During that last week, every night after dinner, Sally sat on the corral fence talking to Churbin and feeding him carrots.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By Ed Park
"Why should you worry if he grows or not, Joe?" says Mr. Kandinsky, the old East End tailor in Wolf Mankowitz's 1953 novel "A Kid for Two Farthings" (Bloomsbury: 128 pp., $14 paper), to his 6-year-old charge. "Take everything for what it is; don't try to improve it, Joe. A chicken is a chicken. A man is a man. A little unicorn is a little unicorn. It's enough." Though the unicorn in question is most likely a sickly goat with one nubbin of a horn -- whom Joe discovered at an animal market alongside dog-sellers and someone known as the Eel King -- Mr. Kandinsky doesn't shatter the story the boy has spun around the creature.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009
"The Party" David McPhail This book is about a boy, his toy animals and his dad. The boy is planning a party with his toys, but his dad falls asleep. The boy decides to party anyway. So he and his toy animals jump on the sleeping dad. They tickle him. They take him to the kitchen on a toy elephant and feed him sandwiches. They take him back upstairs. It is not easy. I like this book because it is funny and has great pictures. Reviewed by Natalie, 7 Welby Way Magnet West Hills "Fairy Realm #6: The Unicorn" Emily Rodda Both worlds, the Fairy Realm and the Human, are in danger.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2009 | DAN NEIL
It's official. Microsoft has no shame. None. They should just stop paying rent on that storage unit where they keep their shame because they, as I said, have none. The new TV ad campaign for Windows 7 (Crispin Porter & Bogusky) kicked off this week with a masterpiece of emotional manipulation that brings back Kylie, the precocious 4-year-old girl from the "I'm a PC" series. The slightly lispy Kylie -- who pronounces the product as "Windows Theben" -- is sitting at a table in front of a PC. "My name's Kylie, and I found these happy words all over my dad's computer.
NEWS
August 10, 2006 | Dean Kuipers, Special to The Times
DON MULLER stands in his living room, grinning like a caffeinated teenager, clearly dazzled by the magic he has wrought. The playroom in his Van Nuys ranch home features four classic jukeboxes crowded around a small dance floor, and lightbulbs are flashing like an arcade around the room and across the ceiling. "See how this model has a speaker on top?" he shouts, patting a 1946 AMI "mother-of-plastic" Model A jukebox, as Eddie Cochran's "Summertime Blues" comes blasting out at about ear-level.
BOOKS
April 10, 1988
Regarding your review of Christopher Nolan's "Under the Eye of the Clock" by Jackson Cope ( Book Review, March 6): I strongly disagree with Cope's review, which I felt to be biased, unenlightened, and grossly insensitive to the creativity of this young writer, who just also happens to be handicapped. My initial thought was that Cope must be overreacting in his effort to avoid "charity" because of the writer's severe handicaps, but upon second reading of the book and of the review, I must believe that he is simply too rigid to see the magnificence of Nolan's use of language.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Nicole Borgenicht
Churbin, a tall jet-black stallion stood by the fence and whinnied. He had gotten his name from a little girl called Sally. She thought he looked like a cherub. Her dad said, " 'Churbin' sounds masculine. That's what we'll name him!" But now, Churbin was alone. He circled the corral, whinnied, listened and waited. He had not eaten in days and he felt like crying. During that last week, every night after dinner, Sally sat on the corral fence talking to Churbin and feeding him carrots.
NEWS
January 5, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf
FOR Grant Gershon, now in his fifth season as music director of the Los Angeles Master Chorale, getting through December required extra jolts of caffeine: He led his 125-member chorus through seven performances at Walt Disney Concert Hall. With the next concert slated for Jan. 22, the 45-year-old Eagle Rock resident has some time to rest up. So how does Gershon -- along with his wife, soprano Elissa Johnston, and their kids, Claire and Samuel, ages 6 and 3 -- conduct his weekends?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2004 | Carmela Ciuraru, Special to The Times
In her 1999 novel "Girl With a Pearl Earring," Tracy Chevalier imagined the story behind Vermeer's captivating painting, describing an erotically charged relationship between the 17th century Dutch artist and his servant girl-muse. In her fourth and latest novel, "The Lady and the Unicorn," she again makes use of a work of art about which little is known to tell a tale of forbidden love.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|