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BUSINESS
January 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And you thought electricity deregulation in California was a rough game. The brash young reformer running Russia's powerful electricity monopoly was the target of an attempt by Soviet-era holdovers to oust him on Wednesday. He survived--but it was a boardroom clash for control some regard as a sign of this country's increasing economic stability and by others as evidence of its shakiness.
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BUSINESS
January 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
And you thought electricity deregulation in California was a rough game. The brash young reformer running Russia's powerful electricity monopoly was the target of an attempt by Soviet-era holdovers to oust him on Wednesday. He survived--but it was a boardroom clash for control some regard as a sign of this country's increasing economic stability and by others as evidence of its shakiness.
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NEWS
July 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
Former Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin was elected Wednesday to chair the Gazprom natural gas monopoly, Russia's largest company. While the post is largely ceremonial--requiring little involvement in the company's day-to-day operations--its occupant can wield great political influence.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2001 | From Bloomberg News, Reuters
Turkey said early today it was abandoning its controlled currency program, allowing the lira to float in a dramatic bid to curb a financial crisis racking the country. The move, after 12 hours of emergency talks, all but spelled the end of a three-year program launched amid high hopes in January 2000, and dealt a heavy blow to Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit. Inevitable devaluation may bring some social hardship.
NEWS
February 21, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the heady upward swing of his career, in the early 1990s, Anatoly A. Sobchak was St. Petersburg's mayor, a heroic defender of democracy, a man many thought would rise higher. But Sobchak, who died early Sunday at 62, sank fast in an ignominious spiral: He grew unpopular, was voted out of office in 1996 and was dogged by a corruption investigation. In the end, it was not Sobchak but his former deputy and right-hand man who was to make the dizzying rise: Vladimir V.
NEWS
June 3, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's most powerful bankers pledged Tuesday to help pull the country back from the brink of financial ruin, but the depth of the crisis was made ever clearer by President Boris N. Yeltsin's criticism of the oligarchs for leading a panicked retreat from the collapsing stock market. Yeltsin summoned 10 of the most influential financial figures to a Kremlin meeting.
NEWS
May 7, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors were closing in Wednesday on a group of former top-level government officials, often labeled "young reformers," who allegedly received property illegally through the state privatization program they helped run. Alfred Kokh, President Boris N. Yeltsin's former privatization chief, was charged Tuesday with embezzlement for allegedly accepting a government-owned apartment in central Moscow.
NEWS
September 9, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key architect of Russia's economic transformation said in a published interview Tuesday that Russia "conned" the international community out of nearly $20 billion in loans by hiding the severity of the country's fiscal problems. Anatoly B. Chubais, who in July negotiated a $4.8-billion loan from the International Monetary Fund, said in an interview in Kommersant Daily that it was necessary and appropriate for Russia to lie to obtain infusions of cash.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bloodied but unbowed, Anatoly B. Chubais, the architect of Russia's economic reforms, conceded Tuesday that his authority has been badly damaged by his acceptance of a $90,000 "book advance" many saw as a bribe, but he insisted he has done nothing unethical.
WORLD
March 18, 2005 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
Anatoly B. Chubais, one of Russia's most prominent business and political leaders, survived an apparent assassination attempt unscathed Thursday when assailants detonated a roadside bomb and then fired at his armored car as he commuted to work on a forested highway. Chubais was the architect of Russia's controversial post-Soviet privatizations of state assets and now is a leader of the pro-market Union of Right Forces party.
NEWS
May 23, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vladimir V. Putin has said that he wants to reform Russia's two biggest monopolies, the gas producer Gazprom and the electric power giant UES, both infamous for inefficiency and for allegedly enriching top management at the expense of shareholders and the public. But critics say recent signals by Putin's government indicate the opposite.
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