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Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act

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NEWS
February 4, 2000 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Corp. and other powerful software companies are quietly pushing state legislation across the nation that would dramatically reduce consumer rights for individuals and businesses who buy or lease software and database information. The push comes as software companies are beefing up their lobbying effort to pass favorable laws while their industry is at peak popularity among politicians who want to keep their local economies booming, consumer groups say.
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NEWS
February 4, 2000 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Corp. and other powerful software companies are quietly pushing state legislation across the nation that would dramatically reduce consumer rights for individuals and businesses who buy or lease software and database information. The push comes as software companies are beefing up their lobbying effort to pass favorable laws while their industry is at peak popularity among politicians who want to keep their local economies booming, consumer groups say.
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BUSINESS
May 29, 2000 | CLIFF EDWARDS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Christopher Dorosz stifles a yawn as he left-clicks his mouse--signaling for the fifth time in 20 minutes that he accepts the terms of use for new software he is installing on his computer. The San Francisco artist impatiently clicks "I agree" when asked if he'll abide by the terms of software for a scanner and a printer; again for accompanying Kodak PhotoMax files; once more for Adobe Photoshop. "I don't have time to read all that stuff," he says.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2000 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than a year of conflict, a campaign by America Online, Microsoft and other powerful software companies to pass legislation dramatically limiting the rights of software buyers appears to have stalled in the face of growing opposition. Half a dozen states this year have considered the controversial legislation, which would allow software companies to ban the sale of used software, avoid fixing software bugs and even block the publication of critical reviews of their products.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2002 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Competitors and federal regulators have failed to stop Microsoft Corp.'s march toward dominance of new areas of the computing world, but there is an increasing chance that one of the software giant's own strategies could hinder its advance.
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