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SPORTS
February 3, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
It's the time of the year when high school football coaches start designing new uniforms for the coming season, and let me make an urgent plea: Can the jersey numbers please be visible to the naked eye? For some unknown reason, new jerseys keep being designed on which the numbers can barely be seen if you're sitting in the bleachers or a press box unless you have binoculars. And even then, they can be tough to identify. It's not good to get grandmothers and grandfathers angry, not to mention TV announcers and sportswriters, but that's what several teams did this past season with their fancy, Nike-designed uniforms.
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BUSINESS
February 3, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The future of American Airlines is still unclear. Will it merge with Tempe, Ariz.-based U.S. Airways or try to go it alone when it exits bankruptcy in the next few weeks? Whatever happens in Bankruptcy Court, the Fort Worth-based carrier will definitely have a new look. Last month American unveiled a new logo and livery, featuring a silver mica color for its planes and red, white and blue stripes on the tails. The airline also announced recently that it would introduce new crew uniforms created by a pair of designers who have dressed celebrities such as Beyonce, Taylor Swift, Halle Berry and Jennifer Aniston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2013 | By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
The family of a man killed by police in Santa Ana disputed the official chain of events leading to his shooting, saying the 39-year-old had fallen asleep in his parked car and was startled when officers began banging on his vehicle. The death of Binh Van Nguyen has stirred protests and rumors, fanned by coverage on Vietnamese radio and conversation at local coffeehouses. In a public outreach effort Monday, Santa Ana city leaders - including Mayor Miguel Pulido and interim Police Chief Carlos Rojas - held a town hall meeting to respond to the rumors and offer reassurance that the shooting is being investigated.
SPORTS
January 11, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
The favorite football league of many desperate and lonely men is no more. The Lingerie Football League has announced plans to rename itself the Legends Football League and said it will no longer have its players compete while wearing lingerie. "This is the next step in the maturation of our now global sport. While the Lingerie Football League name has drawn great media attention allowing us to showcase the sport to millions, we have now reached a crossroad of gaining credibility as a sport or continuing to be viewed as a gimmick," said Mitchell S. Mortaza, the founder of the league.
BUSINESS
December 23, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
For parents, the costs of youth sports can add up. There are fees for leagues and competitions, plus expenses for equipment, training and uniforms. How can you keep the spending under control? Mark Hyman, the author of "The Most Expensive Game in Town," has some advice: • Start an equipment exchange. Hyman has used this himself in youth leagues. "Families bring us their used, outgrown, no-longer-needed baseball pants, lacrosse sticks, soccer shoes, etcetera," he explained. "We then make them available to others at no charge.
SPORTS
December 21, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
Word-association time. Buffalo Braves? "I know Bob McAdoo," said the Clippers' Jamal Crawford. On Friday, he was being asked about his knowledge of the place where it all started for this Clippers' franchise, years ago, in Buffalo. The Buffalo Braves established a franchise-record 11-game winning streak in 1974. But it's hard to expect the Clippers to know that much about the pioneers of the franchise and achievements from 38 years ago. Especially when Crawford was born in 1980.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2012 | By Joel Rubin, Howard Blume and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Police Department plans to significantly increase its presence at the city's more than 540 public elementary and middle schools, with Chief Charlie Beck saying the Sandy Hook Elementary school massacre has created a "new reality" that his department must address. In outlining his plan Monday, Beck said his goal is for uniformed officers to visit the public school campuses on a daily basis, a major change in LAPD deployment strategy that will add an additional logistical stress on a police force already stretched thin by the city's fiscal crisis.
SPORTS
December 1, 2012 | By Gary Klein
Rose Bowl officials are seeing red, but not because they're angry. Stanford's victory over UCLA in the Pac-12 Conference championship game Friday ensured that the 99th Rose Bowl would be awash in hues of one color on New Year's Day. That Wisconsin will be the other team contributing to the palette is somewhat of a surprise. But the Badgers' 70-31 victory over No. 14 Nebraska in Saturday's Big Ten Conference title game puts them in Pasadena for the third consecutive season. "There's going to be a lot of red in this stadium," Rose Bowl executive Kevin Ash said.
SPORTS
November 28, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
A drafty storage room deep in the bowels of the Home Depot Center hardly seems an appropriate place to meet with sporting royalty. Along one cluttered wall stand rolling racks of old uniforms and sweat suits. An oversize World Cup soccer ball sits ignored atop a dusty table, while hanging from the ceiling a tiny mirrored disco ball begins to spin slowly when David Beckham, wearing ragged jeans, a white V-neck T-shirt and a gray wool hat, steps in for another in a seemingly endless series of goodbye interviews.
OPINION
November 12, 2012 | By Jack Shakely
If ever there was a poster child for the law of unintended consequences, it is the Post-9/11 GI Bill. Down through the years, few government programs have enjoyed the almost universal approval of the GI Bill, enacted in 1944 and expanded in 1966. I'm one of its fans: It helped me buy my first home (a bungalow in Hermosa Beach) and sent me to law school. As the U.S. military became all volunteer in the 1970s and America enjoyed more than a quarter-century of peace, the GI Bill seemed less necessary and its benefits dwindled.
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