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Union Carbide Chemicals Plastics Co

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BUSINESS
February 16, 1990 | United Press International
A subsidiary of Union Carbide Corp. said it has signed a letter of intent to sell its polysilicon manufacturing facilities at two Washington state sites to a Japanese company. The price was not disclosed on the agreement between Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Co. and Komatsu Electronic Metals Co. for the sale of the two sites in Moses Lake and Washougal. Both companies said the transaction would help ensure the continued operation of the polysilicon business and preserve about 270 jobs.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1990 | Associated Press
A subsidiary of Union Carbide Corp. will sell a specialty chemical business to Hoechst Celanese Corp., a West German firm, for an undisclosed price, officials said. Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Co. said it has reached an agreement to sell its primary alcohol ethoxylates, or PAEs, business. PAEs are agents used to make household products such as laundry detergents and cleaners.
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BUSINESS
March 22, 1990 | Associated Press
A subsidiary of Union Carbide Corp. will sell a specialty chemical business to Hoechst Celanese Corp., a West German firm, for an undisclosed price, officials said. Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Co. said it has reached an agreement to sell its primary alcohol ethoxylates, or PAEs, business. PAEs are agents used to make household products such as laundry detergents and cleaners.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1990 | United Press International
A subsidiary of Union Carbide Corp. said it has signed a letter of intent to sell its polysilicon manufacturing facilities at two Washington state sites to a Japanese company. The price was not disclosed on the agreement between Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Co. and Komatsu Electronic Metals Co. for the sale of the two sites in Moses Lake and Washougal. Both companies said the transaction would help ensure the continued operation of the polysilicon business and preserve about 270 jobs.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1992 | Associated Press
Union Carbide Chemicals & Plastics Co. has agreed to pay a $1.5-million fine and provide a series of workplace safety procedures at its ethylene oxide production plants in Texas, federal officials said. Dorothy L. Strunk, acting assistant secretary of labor and administrator of the Occupation Safety and Health Administration, said Union Carbide agreed to the fine and workshops as settlement of citations issued against the company after a March, 1991, fire and explosion at the Texas plant.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you think a plastic bottle is a plastic bottle? Think again. It could be a PET bottle, or an HDPE bottle or a polypropylene bottle. You don't care? Well, the people in the fledgling business of plastic recycling do, and if they had their way, you would, too. Contrary to popular belief, plastic is easy to recycle, but only after it's separated by type.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | KATHY McDONALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly 40 companies and government bodies have agreed to clean up toxic wastes they sent to a now-closed solvent-recycling plant here and to reimburse the state for half of the $8 million it has already spent cleaning up the site, officials announced Monday. The total bill for the cleanup could reach $30 million, state officials estimate, and the 38 parties will divide that cost and the $4 million owed the state among themselves.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you think a plastic bottle is a plastic bottle? Think again. It could be a PET bottle, or an HDPE bottle or a polypropylene bottle. You don't care? Well, the people in the fledgling business of plastic recycling do, and if they had their way, you would too. Contrary to popular belief, plastic is easy to recycle, but only after it's separated by type.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In one of the most complicated and closely watched mass injury cases in the nation, a federal appeals court in Philadelphia on Friday rejected a proposed $1.2-billion settlement of thousands of asbestos claims. The U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals ruled 3-0 that the pact did not satisfy the requirements of a proper class action and would unfairly deny a day in court to people who may develop injuries from their exposure to asbestos in the future.
NEWS
February 21, 1994 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
For the past two decades, Philadelphia personal injury lawyer Gene Locks has been battling asbestos companies throughout the United States, becoming a millionaire in the process. Now, Locks says, "the victims have won the war" against 20 surrendering defendants in a $1.2-billion settlement.
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