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NEWS
June 26, 1994 | TOMMY LI
The Los Angeles City Council has approved a 44-year lease that allows a local partnership group to turn the historic city-owned Union Church on San Pedro Street into an Asian arts center. "We're real excited," said Erich Nakano, project manager for Little Tokyo Service Center. "The project will really contribute to revitalizing Little Tokyo and the cultural life of Downtown and the region."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2009 | Duke Helfand
For decades, Union Church of Los Angeles attracted overflow Sunday crowds with its blend of Japanese culture and Christian faith. In recent years, however, many who once filled the pews at the cinder block church in Little Tokyo have moved to the suburbs, leaving a core of aging congregants searching for a solution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1995 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer.
The former Union Church building in Little Tokyo looks decrepit, even spooky. So much so that John Carpenter used the city-owned structure--built in 1923 but unused as a church since 1979--as a location for his horror film "Prince of Darkness" in the mid-'80s. Even that use wouldn't be permitted today--the building is still yellow-tagged as a result of the 1994 earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2009 | Jessica Garrison
Labor unions and some churches announced Tuesday that they planned to file friend-of-the-court briefs in support of invalidating Proposition 8, the November ballot initiative that banned gay marriage in the state. The California Council of Churches and other faith organizations, including the Progressive Jewish Alliance representing millions of members, said they would file Thursday. On Friday, a coalition of labor unions representing more than 2 million California workers said they planned to file their own brief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2009 | Duke Helfand
For decades, Union Church of Los Angeles attracted overflow Sunday crowds with its blend of Japanese culture and Christian faith. In recent years, however, many who once filled the pews at the cinder block church in Little Tokyo have moved to the suburbs, leaving a core of aging congregants searching for a solution.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | IRIS YOKOI
Community leaders have begun a petition drive to rally support for housing the Little Tokyo branch library in the historic Union Church building. The Little Tokyo Service Center is spearheading the effort to renovate the long-vacant brick building at 120 N. San Pedro St. so it can house the library along with Visual Communications, a nonprofit media company. The city Board of Library Commissioners has yet to approve the idea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998
The former Union Church, a national historic and cultural landmark, has been reborn as the Union Center for the Arts. The long-awaited cultural center, which rose from the ruins of the church built in 1923, will now become home for three of Los Angeles' oldest arts organizations: East West Players, L.A. Artcore and Visual Communications. The centerpiece of the complex is a 250-seat theater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1985 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
The old Nishi Hongwanji Buddhist Temple in Little Tokyo has stood empty for years, its windows boarded and pigeon droppings defiling its imitation thatched-roof entryway. Nearby, the old Union Church stands similarly ghostly. For years, a sentence of death hung over these city-owned buildings that once were the centers of social and religious life for Southern California's Japanese-American community. Similarly doomed, it seemed, were the small shops, restaurants and residential hotels nearby.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | IRIS YOKOI
The effort to restore the historic Union Church building remains alive, even though a theatrical group has pulled out of the project. The Little Tokyo Service Center hopes to restore the long-vacant brick building at 120 N. San Pedro St. so Visual Communications, a nonprofit media company, and the Little Tokyo Branch Library, can move in. The East West Players had hoped to repair and move into the building but abandoned the plan last fall, mainly because of the estimated $3-million cost.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | GEOFF BOUCHER
The Rev. Carlos Paiva finds it difficult to get any desk work done these days. Instead of peering down a quiet parking lot, the pastor of Angelica Lutheran Church now looks out his window every afternoon to see exuberant youngsters playing basketball and volleyball. "It's very hard to read," the Peruvian-born Paiva said over the din. With a broad smile, he added: "Isn't it wonderful?"
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's perhaps the most ubiquitous crime in this boom town: the daily exploitation of migrant workers who toil in restaurants, hotels and construction sites. An untold number of them, authorities say, are denied the basic protections of federal and state labor laws on minimum wage, work breaks and job safety. Teenagers illegally operate meat slicers in mom-and-pop delicatessens. Maids are denied their 10-minute breaks while readying rooms for the next wave of tourists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1998 | STEVE BERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to draw on the church-based activism that served organized workers in the 1920s and the civil rights movement of the 1960s, a top union official said Sunday that the mission of labor is to become the "tool of God" to bring about fair treatment for workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998
The former Union Church, a national historic and cultural landmark, has been reborn as the Union Center for the Arts. The long-awaited cultural center, which rose from the ruins of the church built in 1923, will now become home for three of Los Angeles' oldest arts organizations: East West Players, L.A. Artcore and Visual Communications. The centerpiece of the complex is a 250-seat theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1995 | Don Shirley, Don Shirley is a Times staff writer.
The former Union Church building in Little Tokyo looks decrepit, even spooky. So much so that John Carpenter used the city-owned structure--built in 1923 but unused as a church since 1979--as a location for his horror film "Prince of Darkness" in the mid-'80s. Even that use wouldn't be permitted today--the building is still yellow-tagged as a result of the 1994 earthquake.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | GEOFF BOUCHER
The Rev. Carlos Paiva finds it difficult to get any desk work done these days. Instead of peering down a quiet parking lot, the pastor of Angelica Lutheran Church now looks out his window every afternoon to see exuberant youngsters playing basketball and volleyball. "It's very hard to read," the Peruvian-born Paiva said over the din. With a broad smile, he added: "Isn't it wonderful?"
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | TOMMY LI
The Los Angeles City Council has approved a 44-year lease that allows a local partnership group to turn the historic city-owned Union Church on San Pedro Street into an Asian arts center. "We're real excited," said Erich Nakano, project manager for Little Tokyo Service Center. "The project will really contribute to revitalizing Little Tokyo and the cultural life of Downtown and the region."
BUSINESS
April 24, 1985 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Cooperation between unions and church groups around the world has gotten a healthy boost from the success of about 400 strikers at a Coca-Cola plant in Guatemala. Their unusual strike, which began in the late 1970s, officially ended last week when the Guatemalan government, run by a military dictatorship that has long repressed unions, finally gave its blessing to the strike victory.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian Orthodox Church is planning to build a shrine to the "martyrs" of the Bolshevik Revolution on the site where Nicholas II, Russia's last czar, was executed by the Communists in 1918. Nikolai P. Kalinin, warden of St. John the Baptist Cathedral in Sverdlovsk, said Tuesday that a large chapel will be built and regular services held to honor Nicholas, his family and servants, and other "martyrs unjustly executed" in the past seven decades of Communist rule.
NEWS
January 10, 1993 | IRIS YOKOI
Community leaders have begun a petition drive to rally support for housing the Little Tokyo branch library in the historic Union Church building. The Little Tokyo Service Center is spearheading the effort to renovate the long-vacant brick building at 120 N. San Pedro St. so it can house the library along with Visual Communications, a nonprofit media company. The city Board of Library Commissioners has yet to approve the idea.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | IRIS YOKOI
The effort to restore the historic Union Church building remains alive, even though a theatrical group has pulled out of the project. The Little Tokyo Service Center hopes to restore the long-vacant brick building at 120 N. San Pedro St. so Visual Communications, a nonprofit media company, and the Little Tokyo Branch Library, can move in. The East West Players had hoped to repair and move into the building but abandoned the plan last fall, mainly because of the estimated $3-million cost.
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