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SPORTS
May 16, 1993 | BILL CHRISTINE
After patiently explaining why Union City had to be destroyed after suffering multiple fractures of his right foreleg during Saturday's Preakness, trainer Wayne Lukas responded angrily when questioning alluded to his breakdown record with horses. "We all have horses that break down," Lukas said. "I work at this game 18 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. My record (of leading the nation in purses 10 consecutive years) speaks for itself.
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SPORTS
September 6, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
CINCINNATI - The youngest of Mark Ellis' three children is a 2-year-old girl named Dylan. So when Sarah Ellis, wife of the Dodgers' second baseman, read about the death of an 8-year-old Indiana boy named Dylan Williams following a baseball practice earlier this summer, it haunted her. “The baseball tie-in and the name of the child and everything kind of struck her. And she reached out to the community to see if there was anything we could do,”...
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SPORTS
August 6, 1991 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To say that several key players on the Conejo American Legion baseball team had been waiting two years for another shot at Union City would be a bit of an overstatement. To state that they had been waiting two days, and anxiously at that, would not. As 15-year-olds, several current Conejo players were defeated by Union City in a youth-league playoff game in which the victors qualified for the World Series.
NATIONAL
June 1, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
Officials in three Midwestern states worked to assess damage and launch clean-up efforts a day after a series of tornadoes and violent storms struck Friday evening, killing at least nine people and triggering mass flooding. Extensive flooding hampered the emergency response in Oklahoma on Saturday, particularly in the Oklahoma City area, where at least five tornadoes touched down Friday evening. “With flooding, it takes a little bit more time. We have to wait for the floodwaters to recede before we can get in and start clean-up,” said Keli Cain, spokeswoman for the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management.
SPORTS
August 6, 1990 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His Woodland Hills West teammates often call him "Lightning." With a name--and a right arm--like that of pitcher-outfielder Sean Boldt, it seems a natural tag. But it appears that there's more to this moniker than meets the ear. "They call him 'Lightning,' because you don't know where he's gonna strike," West Coach Don Hornback said. "You've probably noticed that when he's in the game, things seem to happen around him. Or to him." On Sunday, Boldt's arm and bat both provided some thunder.
SPORTS
April 4, 1993 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gary Stevens was not where he wanted to be, but he was astride a horse who didn't seem to care. Forced to take the tiring path near the rail, favored Personal Hope shook off a stubborn filly, Eliza, and outfinished Union City by three-quarters of a length to win the $500,000 Santa Anita Derby on Saturday. It was Stevens' third victory in the stake, all in the last six years.
SPORTS
September 6, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
CINCINNATI - The youngest of Mark Ellis' three children is a 2-year-old girl named Dylan. So when Sarah Ellis, wife of the Dodgers' second baseman, read about the death of an 8-year-old Indiana boy named Dylan Williams following a baseball practice earlier this summer, it haunted her. “The baseball tie-in and the name of the child and everything kind of struck her. And she reached out to the community to see if there was anything we could do,”...
NEWS
February 6, 1989
Police in Union City sought a man who attempted to kidnap a 14-year-old girl as she twirled her baton in an apartment complex parking lot. Alecia Christopherson managed to free herself by using self-defense moves and ran to her parents' nearby apartment, police said. Police reported no leads on the identity of the man. The incident further fueled fears in the Bay Area, where three girls have disappeared in the last eight months in a 40-mile radius in the East Bay.
NEWS
July 19, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
State technicians Friday began testing samples of three batches of fruit and vegetables removed from stores in the San Francisco Bay Area after anonymous callers claimed the produce was poisoned. William Ihle, spokesman for the state Department of Health Services, said results of the tests will not be available until Monday. "We have found a few items that we feel to be suspicious," Ihle said. The produce came from two Lucky stores in Redwood City and a Safeway in Union City, he said.
NATIONAL
June 1, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- The death toll from a series of tornadoes and violent storms that swept across the Midwest rose to at least nine Saturday, with dozens reported injured as officials continued to assess damage. The Friday night storms battered a region still recovering from the deadly tornado that killed two dozen people in Moore, Okla., May 20, leveling suburban neighborhoods. Perhaps as a result, many Oklahoma City commuters who heard tornado sirens late Friday headed for safety and found themselves trapped on local highways as tornadoes loomed.
OPINION
April 7, 2013 | By David L. Kirp
The bile flowed freely in the first round of L.A.'s school board elections in March, fueled by unprecedented sums of campaign money. To what end? Listening to the ads of the self-styled reformers, you'd have thought that charter schools were the elixir for every ill and teachers were slackers who needed a kick in the pants. For its part, the teachers union dismissed those who disagreed with it as corporate takeover artists. The school board campaign, which isn't over yet, is a fight over power - how to hire and fire teachers, for example - not a debate over education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2013 | By David Zahniser and Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
In a city reeling from earthquakes, riots and a deep recession, Tim Leiweke emerged as a powerful force in Los Angeles. He made his mark in 1999, opening Staples Center in a moribund section of downtown. Then the L.A. Live complex, which changed the downtown skyline for the first time in a decade. Leiweke's departure Thursday as head of entertainment giant Anschutz Entertainment Group sent ripples through not only L.A.'s business community but also its civic and political circles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Police Protective League filed suit Wednesday against the city and its Police Department over a controversial policy that will limit cases in which police officers impound vehicles of drivers operating without a license. The new procedures put Los Angeles police officers in conflict with state laws governing 30-day impounds and could expose them to civil liability, according to the lawsuit filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court. The union, which represents more than 9,900 sworn LAPD employees, is asking a judge to determine the validity of the policy and impose an injunction to stop it from being implemented.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2011 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from San Francisco -- The revived Occupy Oakland movement has called for a citywide general strike Wednesday that has garnered nationwide support from activists and the philosophical backing of labor unions, while triggering growing consternation that the city's strained economy could suffer further. The call for businesses to close and residents to demonstrate at banks and later march to the Port of Oakland came after last week's heavy police response to protesters speaking out against the razing of the movement's City Hall encampment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009
Harold Bell Creator of Woodsy Owl Harold Bell, 90, a merchandising executive who designed the environmentally conscious character Woodsy Owl that urged people to "Give a Hoot, Don't Pollute," died Dec. 4 of renal failure and complications in West Los Angeles, his family said. Bell created Woodsy Owl in 1970, in time for the first Earth Day, according to Gerald R. Williams' book "The Forest Service: Fighting for Public Lands. " The idea was to create a symbol that would "promote wise use of the environment and programs that foster maintenance and improvement of environmental quality," Williams wrote.
SPORTS
August 18, 1990 | STEVE ELLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watching a seemingly endless game between New Mexico and Utah on Friday night, Woodland Hills West right-hander Corey Bromberg uttered what was meant to be a joke. After New Mexico had taken a two-run lead in the top of the 13th inning and a Utah batter had come up with a man on, Bromberg--waiting to start West's third-round game in the American Legion Southwest regional tournament--said: "If this kid hits it out, I'm not pitching." Boom. Gone.
NEWS
January 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Luis Torres' friends figured they could get him off heroin if he could only see himself on drugs, so they videotaped him as he was coming down from a high. For six or seven minutes, they recorded him as he went through body-racking seizures and struggled to breathe. But Torres, 32, never got to see the tape. The Union City, N.J., carpet installer died a few hours later, apparently of an overdose. Prosecutor Terrence Hull said no charges will be filed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 2008 | Paul Pringle, Times Staff Writer
The Compton city attorney's office is investigating a $1-per-lot sale of government land to a housing corporation that failed to receive the tax-exempt status it sought and is associated with a Los Angeles labor union mired in a spending scandal. The housing group was established as a nonprofit in 2004, but never received an Internal Revenue Service exemption and had lost its right to do business in California for not filing its tax returns, The Times disclosed last month. It was founded under the direction of Tyrone Freeman, president of the Service Employees International Union local, whose financial practices are the subject of a federal criminal investigation and a congressional inquiry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2006 | Jim Newton, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa this week faces a test that few would have predicted for the former union organizer who now occupies the seat of government in one of America's most historically anti-labor cities: Thousands of his own workers, members of the city's Engineers and Architects Assn., are prepared to strike and are asking other employees to join them.
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