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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1986 | Clarke Taylor
It wasn't easy for writer-director John Sayles to get financing for his most ambitious--and most political--movie to date. "In Reagan-anti-labor America, a pro -union movie is not what everybody's dying to make," said Maggie Renzi, producer of the $4-million period piece, "Matewan." It begins filming in W. Va. locations on Sept. 3. The very political Haskell Wexler ("Medium Cool," "Latino") is the cinematographer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2005
IN his article about newly elected Screen Actors Guild President Alan Rosenberg ["His Union Divided Cannot Stand," Oct. 4], Patrick Goldstein asks the interesting question, "Why do baseball players have a more effective union?" Well, besides the obvious -- that the majority of baseball's union members are working -- two of the most glaring differences might also be: 1. Baseball players do not live under the threat (at least not yet) that owners are going to field teams of no-name players in Romania, Hungary, the Czech Republic and Bulgaria.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1991
Which U.S. labor union has had more than 100 leaders who have been charged with crimes? And four of its last seven presidents indicted? And which has been called the most Mob-controlled in the nation's history? The answer, of course, is the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. But today's Teamsters are no longer what they were. The union doesn't represent only truckers now. Nurses, sheriff's deputies, hospital workers, state troopers, even teachers and librarians count themselves among its 1.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
Nine Democratic presidential contenders plan to converge on Chicago tonight to tout their solidarity with American workers at a time when organized labor is mobilizing to oust President Bush. At least one of the nine, Rep. Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri, harbors some hope of winning an early endorsement from the nation's largest labor federation, the AFL-CIO -- a coveted but seldom-given credential that Al Gore secured four years ago on his way to winning the party's nomination.
SPORTS
June 17, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE
Britain's Nick Faldo pointed his putter in mock anger Saturday on the 17th green at a group picketing the U.S. Open just outside a fence at the Medinah Country Club. Faldo seemed annoyed by the noise the picketers were making but made his putt. Representative of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union are protesting the USGA's sale of merchandise manufactured by LaMode du Golf, which manufactures golf shirts and other items.
SPORTS
December 16, 1989 | JOHN STEADMAN, BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
Now the National Football League Players Association has reversed its field, running off in a different direction and deliberately throwing itself for an embarrassing loss. This is what happens when you play at the high-stakes game of labor relations. The leaders, executive director Gene Upshaw and aide Doug Allen, insist they are not involved in a union per se, which is what a certain sportswriter has been trying to tell them ad infinitum for well over two decades.
NEWS
February 6, 1994
Unlike Kip Dellinger (1/27/94) I can lay no claim to being a California licensed professional for 2 1/2 decades. But adding up many more decades than that, I am a graduate of L.A. Unified, mother of two fellow graduates, have a daughter, sister and sister-in-law who teach in L.A. Unified, Mill Valley and Tustin, respectively. You can well imagine how school talk, as professionals and as parents, has been a mainstay of family conversation about these three widely disparate, but quintessentially Californian, school districts for these many years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1989 | ANDREA FORD, Times Staff Writer
Betty Findley says she didn't necessarily intend to defy the powers that be at the Magic Kingdom. All she wanted to do was demonstrate the fact that she is, as she simply puts it, "union." But to keep both her pride and the Walt Disney Co.'s dress code intact, the 50-year-old grandmother and a waitress for 13 years at the Disneyland Hotel's Monorail Cafe knew she would have to use a little ingenuity. To get around a section of the code that prohibits employees from wearing "unauthorized insignia, pins and buttons" while on the job, Findley had union lapel pins made into earrings.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1987 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Not since the 1940s have so many prominent union leaders been subjected to the kind of harsh attacks leveled against those who helped organize last Saturday's demonstrations in Washington and San Francisco against President Reagan's foreign policies.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
In 1977, documentary filmmaker Barbara Kopple released a movie called "Harlan County, U.S.A." that chronicled a strike against a power company by coal miners in eastern Kentucky. A longtime advocate of the American labor movement, Kopple shaped the happenings in Harlan County into a stirring David and Goliath story that found her clearly on the side of the workers. Her film won an Academy Award and is regarded as a classic documentary work, so when Kopple showed up in Austin, Minn.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2003 | Ronald Brownstein
Des Moines Poll results in Iowa and New Hampshire. Fund-raising totals. Lists of endorsements in the key early states. All measure the strength of the contenders for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination. But there's another number worth watching: 8.8 million. That number is the key to capturing what could be an invaluable asset in the race: the endorsement of the AFL-CIO. Under its rules, the AFL-CIO will only endorse a candidate if unions representing two-thirds of its roughly 13.
SPORTS
December 28, 2001 | J.A. Adande
Now that the Mo Vaughn trade is finally done--peace treaties have taken less time--it feels like the first day after the rainstorm, when the air is crisper and those mountains in the distance reappear. Vaughn's time with the Angels represented the darkest hour yet, the most indisputable evidence that the franchise was cursed. Now that he's gone, the sky looks a little bluer. The Angels were able to get Kevin Appier, a quality starting pitcher, from the New York Mets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2001
As an employee of an open shop--nonunion--construction company, I am shocked and disappointed by Dana Parsons' June 13 column ("Congressmen Aren't Looking for the Union Label in County"). Why should congressmen in Orange County discriminate against contractors just because they choose not to join a labor union? Especially since the open-shop sector of the construction industry represents 80% of the work force. Parsons fails to recognize that 80% of Orange County-based electricians, plumbers, carpenters and others will not have the right to build the projects they pay for. These skilled employees, not the so-called "illegal residents" mentioned by Parsons, have the same training as their union counterparts and therefore the same right to work on public projects in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2001 | DANA PARSONS
We all know (gulp) of marriages that seem to defy logical explanation. How did those two ever hook up? The parties didn't know each other that long, shared no common historic interests and, if truth be told, probably never really trusted each other's intentions. But even those modest obstacles might be surmountable if it weren't for the No. 1 impediment to long-running happy marriages: nosy relatives. Oh, the mischief they can cause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Editor's note: The following story, published in Tuesday's Valley Edition, inadvertently ran with sections of the story out of order. It is correctly presented here in its entirety. * Mona Field has been called many things: a Vietnam war protester, a Sandinista supporter, a liberal, a feminist and a union die-hard. She denies none of these labels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1999 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mona Field has been called many things: a Vietnam war protester, a Sandinista supporter, a liberal, a feminist and a union die-hard. She denies none of these labels. But until she ran for a Los Angeles Community College District trusteeship, the 15-year Glendale Community College professor had never thought of herself as an obstacle to ethnic diversity.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
Looking for the union label may not do the job in Santa Monica, according to Virginia Jimenez, a representative of the local printers' union. She appeared before the City Council this week to complain that someone had fraudulently used the union label on a printing job for the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2001
As an employee of an open shop--nonunion--construction company, I am shocked and disappointed by Dana Parsons' June 13 column ("Congressmen Aren't Looking for the Union Label in County"). Why should congressmen in Orange County discriminate against contractors just because they choose not to join a labor union? Especially since the open-shop sector of the construction industry represents 80% of the work force. Parsons fails to recognize that 80% of Orange County-based electricians, plumbers, carpenters and others will not have the right to build the projects they pay for. These skilled employees, not the so-called "illegal residents" mentioned by Parsons, have the same training as their union counterparts and therefore the same right to work on public projects in Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1998 | TOM GRAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In another instance of organized labor's dwindling hold on the loyalty of private-sector workers, engineers at the Skunk Works, where Lockheed has pushed the frontiers of military aviation design since World War II, have voted to scuttle their union. The engineers voted 444-407 Thursday to decertify the Engineers and Scientists Guild as their bargaining agent with the Lockheed-Martin Corp., with decertification proponents saying that unions are not for professionals.
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