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January 28, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
The news Tuesday that college athletes are seeking representation by a labor union brought a knowing smile to academics who operate far from the field house. The move by Northwestern football players to join the United Steelworkers union is unprecedented by college athletes, but old news among University of California system graduate student instructors. "We've been there, done that, and it works," UC Berkeley professor Harley Shaiken said. Shaiken teaches an undergraduate labor relations course called "The Southern Border," a class that contains 400 students and eight graduate student instructors.
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SPORTS
January 28, 2014 | Bill Plaschke
The news Tuesday that college athletes are seeking representation by a labor union brought a knowing smile to academics who operate far from the field house. The move by Northwestern football players to join the United Steelworkers union is unprecedented by college athletes, but old news among University of California system graduate student instructors. "We've been there, done that, and it works," UC Berkeley professor Harley Shaiken said. Shaiken teaches an undergraduate labor relations course called "The Southern Border," a class that contains 400 students and eight graduate student instructors.
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OPINION
August 31, 1997 | David Kusnet, David Kusnet, a visiting fellow at the Economic Policy Institute, was chief speech writer for President Bill Clinton from 1992 through 1994. He is the author of "Speaking American: How the Democrats Can Win in the Nineties."
Now that federal monitors have ordered a new presidential election in the Teamsters Union and expanded their investigation of last year's campaign, they run the risk of defeating their original objectives. What if the new election or some other upheaval returns the 1.3-million-member union to the control of an old guard whose shady practices forced federal involvement in the union's internal affairs almost 10 years ago?
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013 | By Alana Semuels
Union membership is continuing to shrink throughout the country, even as companies add jobs in one-time union strongholds such as Michigan. Union membership fell to 11.3% of wage and salary workers last year, down from 11.8% the year before, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said today . In 1981, 20.1% of wage and salary workers were unionized. The latest numbers, while not a surprise, are the result of both political maneuvering and corporate negotiations. Both Michigan and Indiana became right-to-work states over the last year, meaning unions cannot require members to pay dues as a condition of employment.
NEWS
April 2, 1985
Polish fuel and energy costs rose as much as 32% as the second stage of three government-imposed price increases went into effect. The outlawed Solidarity union movement had urged workers to stage protests, such as marches after work and meetings in factories, but apparently failed to mobilize support. The price of coal rose 20%, electricity went up 22% and natural gas rose 32%.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
The board of the nation's largest labor union gave its leadership the authority Saturday to break away from the AFL-CIO, citing a "fundamental and apparently irreconcilable disagreement" over how to rebuild the ailing labor movement. Meeting in San Francisco, the executive board of the 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1994 | Bob Modica, 49, is president of Local 582 of the Plumbers & Steamfitters Union in Santa Ana. He moved to Southern California from Wilkes-Barre, Pa. ; As Told to ROBERT SCHEER
The economy in the state of California is the worst I've seen in the 30 years that I have been here. I've been involved in the union movement for those 30 years and this is the worst it's been. Our membership in Orange County has dropped from 1,500 to 800. Nationally, the labor movement is about 16-17% of the work force; it used to be 24%. There's a lot of people who say they are not in a union, but they are--they don't realize it. My son's a deputy sheriff and he belongs to an association.
NEWS
March 7, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
Evidence of a factional split in Poland's new, official trade union movement has emerged in a bitter attack by one of the new unions on the government's economic policy. In a formal statement reportedly barred from publication by government censors, the new Federation of Metallurgical Workers accuses the government of "deviating from the principles of a socialist economy" and lying about the public acceptability of food price increases.
OPINION
May 3, 1998 | Nelson Lichtenstein, Nelson Lichtenstein, a historian at the University of Virginia, is author of "The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit: Walter Reuther and the Fate of American Labor."
Now that government investigators have cleared James P. Hoffa to make a new run for the Teamster presidency, his election to the top job in the nation's most powerful union would seem a shoo-in. His opponent is a relative unknown, Ken Hall, an aide to former Teamster President Ron Carey, who was disqualified in November after a federal election officer found that an elaborate money-laundering scheme, condoned by Carey, had tainted the 1996 union election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
Success and access to the halls of power haven't robbed the passion from Richard L. Trumka, a third-generation mine worker who rose to the pinnacle of the U.S. labor movement. "The middle class is under assault right now, nearly extinct," Trumka, president of the AFL-CIO, said Thursday during his first official visit to Los Angeles since taking the helm of the federation last year. "We have the very rich and we have the rest of us." He laments what he views as the erosion of the U.S. social democracy since the mid-1970s.
OPINION
December 13, 2012 | By Michael Kinsley
The enactment of a so-called right-to-work law by the state of Michigan this week is indeed, as the media have described it, a blow against the union movement. Michigan, of all places. But it is also a blow against fairness and common sense. "Right to work" sounds like a law guaranteeing you a job, or at least protecting your job once you've got it. A lot of the propaganda by the Chamber of Commerce and similar business groups is about so-called forced unionism. In fact, the main effect of a right-to-work law is nearly the opposite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2010 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
Success and access to the halls of power haven't robbed the passion from Richard L. Trumka, a third-generation mine worker who rose to the pinnacle of the U.S. labor movement. "The middle class is under assault right now, nearly extinct," Trumka, president of the AFL-CIO, said Thursday during his first official visit to Los Angeles since taking the helm of the federation last year. "We have the very rich and we have the rest of us." He laments what he views as the erosion of the U.S. social democracy since the mid-1970s.
OPINION
September 5, 2009 | Patt Morrison
With about 92% of private-sector jobs non-unionized, the old "union movement" has become the new "labor movement," one of outreach as much as contract negotiating. In Los Angeles, some of that work falls to Maria Elena Durazo. She succeeded her husband as head of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, a year after he died, at 53, in 2005. On Labor Day weekend, she considers the state of the labor movement and her role in it. What led you to the labor movement? There were six girls in our family and five boys, and we worked out in the fields -- no toilets, no drinking water, no shade.
OPINION
February 1, 2009 | Harold Meyerson, Harold Meyerson is editor at large of the American Prospect and an Op-Ed columnist for the Washington Post.
By one measure, last Wednesday was that rarity of rarities for American labor: a good day. The measure was that of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which announced that union membership actually increased by 428,000 in 2008. After decades of decline, the uptick in union membership signaled that some unions, at least, have figured out how to organize, despite relentless employer opposition and toothless worker-protection laws.
OPINION
May 22, 2008 | Nelson Lichtenstein, Nelson Lichtenstein is a professor of history at UC Santa Barbara, where he directs the Center for the Study of Work, Labor and Democracy.
When an internal fight at a trade union erupts into the news, American culture has a ready frame. It's Marlon Brando versus Lee J. Cobb in "On the Waterfront" once again, perhaps updated by a recent episode of "The Wire," set among the corrupt and gritty longshoremen of the Baltimore docks. Or it's a modern-day retelling of the Jimmy Hoffa/Teamsters story, destined to end in another mysterious gangland murder.
OPINION
June 17, 2007 | Jim Newton, JIM NEWTON is Editorial Page editor of The Times.
AN INTERVIEW with Madeline Janis is speckled with paradox -- her sunny countenance is shadowed by hints of sadness, her idealism backed by hard, practical politics. She exudes a sort of wistfulness, but with a decidedly steely core. Janis is a native of the San Fernando Valley who left Los Angeles for college but returned with a zeal for helping immigrants and low-wage workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1986 | EDWARD J. CARLOUGH, Edward J. Carlough has been the president of the Sheet Metal Workers' International Assn. since 1970
Labor Day is for all of us. On Labor Day we do not honor just one great individual, or one specific group. On Labor Day we pause to honor ourselves, the working men and women who keep this nation going and our heroes of the past who fought--and sometimes died--for the rights and benefits that we take for granted. Labor Day is truly the holiday for all of us--butcher, baker, candlestick maker, as well as nurse, construction worker, police officer, janitor and every other wage earner.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2006 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
In June 1947, just days after Congress voted to weaken the power of labor unions by passing the Taft-Hartley Act, attorney Morris P. Glushien resigned his position at the National Labor Relations Board. Years earlier, Glushien had been appointed associate general counsel of the board -- a seemingly ideal position for an attorney who was concerned about fair labor practices.
OPINION
December 11, 2005 | Julius Getman and Thomas Kohler, JULIUS G. GETMAN teaches labor law at the University of Texas School of Law. THOMAS C. KOHLER teaches labor and employment law at Boston College Law School.
THE REMARKABLE recent success of the Service Employees International Union in organizing more than 5,000 janitors in Houston constituted the largest victorious union organizing drive in the South in recent memory. For those of us who still believe in the importance of the union movement, it was a welcome sign of organized labor's much-needed revitalization after years of falling membership and declining influence.
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