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Union Pacific Corp

BUSINESS
January 5, 1990
When Union Pacific Corp. put its massive landholdings up for sale, Koll Co. wasn't the only local developer that went shopping. (In the largest deal in its history, Koll bought a half-billion dollars worth of land and buildings from the railroad recently.) SDC Development, a much smaller neighbor of Koll's in Newport Beach, paid Union Pacific $16 million for an industrial park called Mira Loma Industrial Center in Riverside County.
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BUSINESS
January 19, 2005 | James F. Peltz, Times Staff Writer
Union Pacific Corp. said Tuesday that it planned to resume limited outbound rail service Monday on its last two lines from Southern California that had been closed because of the recent rains. But the railroad said it would continue indefinitely to block shipments from entering Southern California through normal routes in order "to control traffic in the region."
BUSINESS
June 18, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Union Pacific Corp., owner of the largest U.S. railroad, intends to hire 5,000 train-crew workers, 800 more than its previous plan, to help end delays that forced the company to turn away shipments and reduced profit. "We are leaving business on the table that we could have moved if our service was better," said Chief Executive Richard Davidson, who announced the increased hiring at a transportation conference in New York.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1999 | JAMES F. PELTZ
Union Pacific Corp. finally knows how to run a railroad again, and Wall Street is happily on board. Less than two years after the nation's biggest rail carrier suffered bottlenecks and other operating snags so massive that they nearly paralyzed the U.S. freight-transportation system, Union Pacific is again moving its trains faster, posting growing profit and enjoying a surging stock price.
BUSINESS
May 30, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Union Pacific Corp. shares fell 2.5% on Friday after the largest U.S. railroad surprised analysts by warning it will report a second-quarter loss as track congestion persists and shippers' claims mount. Also Friday, Union Pacific lost a regulatory battle when the Surface Transportation Board allowed Amtrak to significantly expand its delivery of express packages and time-sensitive freight shipments.
BUSINESS
May 13, 1998 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite issuing assurances earlier this year that freight traffic jams in Southern California and elsewhere were easing, Union Pacific Corp. is indicating it's made little progress in alleviating delays. In its weekly report to federal regulators, the railroad operator said personnel problems and track construction are still causing major delays in the Southland. "They are still running behind," said Jack Kyser, chief economist of the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1991 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Birtcher, a big developer based here, said Monday that it is expanding its business in the Seattle area with the $16.5-million purchase of about 230 acres and several buildings from a Union Pacific Railroad subsidiary. Birtcher said it will construct about $200 million worth of factories and warehouses for sale and lease on the land, which is in the cities of Kent and Sumner, south of Seattle.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2005 | From Times Wire Services
Union Pacific Corp. said Thursday that track damage from floods and washouts caused by punishing storms in California and Nevada might cut the number of trains serving Los Angeles by as many as a third for an "extended period." The nation's largest railroad, which resumed service on two routes east from Los Angeles on Wednesday, is making arrangements for rerouting a portion of the 90 trains a day that typically operate in the region, spokeswoman Kathryn Blackwell said.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1994 | From Associated Press
Santa Fe Pacific Corp. late Thursday spurned a $3.2-billion takeover bid from rival Union Pacific Corp. and reaffirmed plans to merge with Burlington Northern Inc. in a $2.5-billion deal. The terse rejection announcement by Santa Fe's board says they believe the merger with Burlington Northern is better for shareholders despite the lower price and that that merger would be far more likely to receive federal approval.
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