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Union Pacific Railroad Co

NEWS
July 4, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ and JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Union Pacific Corp.'s historic purchase of Southern Pacific Rail Corp. was approved by the U.S. government Wednesday, clearing the way for a $5.4-billion merger that will create the nation's largest railroad and the dominant rail shipper in California. The deal is the most dramatic example yet of the rail industry's effort to use mergers as the means of reestablishing itself as a leading provider of intercity goods, a role it surrendered decades ago to the trucking industry.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by officials from California and 20 other states, one of the West's most storied railroad companies, Southern Pacific Rail, hopes federal regulators today will approve its $5.4-billion merger with its onetime archrival, Union Pacific Railroad. The proposed deal, the biggest in transportation history, would create a 37,000-mile rail behemoth linking 25 states, Mexico and Canada.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
Conrail Inc. offered $1.5 billion for some rail lines owned by Southern Pacific Rail Corp. before joining opponents of Southern Pacific's plan to be acquired by Union Pacific Corp. Conrail said it bid for San Francisco-based Southern Pacific's eastern lines in September. The offer was rejected but remains on the table, Conrail said in a filing with the Surface Transportation Board last week. The offer was made to Bethlehem, Pa.-based Union Pacific, which has agreed to pay $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1994 | MARISA OSORIO COLON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Southern Pacific, Union Pacific and Santa Fe railroads agreed Thursday to use the Alameda Corridor, a 20-mile railway that will run from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach to Downtown Los Angeles. The corridor, which is expected to cost about $1.8 billion to build, would separate train and automobile traffic, providing a high-speed rail link for freight. Now, freight carried by rail can take eight hours to move across the Los Angeles Basin because trains must go 5 to 10 m.p.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1994
Local officials predicted a significant economic boom to the region Friday as the long-awaited Alameda Corridor rail project took another step closer to reality. Los Angeles and Long Beach port officials concluded negotiations this week with Union Pacific Railroad, the last of three freight haulers participating in the $1.8-billion transit link from the harbor area to Downtown. "Today's agreement moves the corridor from a dream to a reality," Mayor Richard Riordan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
There's more trouble ahead for the Southland's biggest public works project--the proposed $1.8-billion Alameda Corridor high-speed freight line between the harbor and Downtown Los Angeles that backers say will create thousands of jobs. Jobs are badly needed here after a long recession and defense cutbacks. The corridor project would generate them by greatly increasing the capacity of the L.A. and Long Beach harbors just as trade with the Far East is taking off.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993 | TERRY SPENCER
The city filed an $800,000 lawsuit this week against Southern California Gas Co. and Union Pacific Railroad, claiming, in part, that it wasn't informed that property bought for a redevelopment project was contaminated with hazardous materials. The city claims it spent $830,000 in cleanup and attorney fees after discovering petroleum byproducts buried under two parcels near the intersection of Pauline and Cypress streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1993 | TERRY SPENCER
Before Disneyland, Anaheim was known nationally as one of those California towns with a funny-sounding name that was shouted by a radio railroad conductor as a running gag on "the Jack Benny Show." "Train leaving on Track 5 for Anaheim, Azusa and Cucamonga," voice master extraordinaire Mel Blanc cried out during the 1940s and '50s to ever-answering laughter. In reality, however, passenger train service to Anaheim had ended in the 1930s.
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