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Union Pacific Railroad Co

BUSINESS
November 10, 1998 | Reuters
Union Pacific Railroad plans to hire about 60,000 workers over the next 12 years to replace retirees and to handle business growth. "We plan to hire 5,000 a year over the next dozen years," said Ed Trandahl, spokesman for the Omaha-based rail and interstate trucking company. "These would be high-paid, blue-collar jobs," Trandahl said, adding that most will be locomotive engineers and conductors.
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BUSINESS
September 30, 1998 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Union Pacific Railroad said Tuesday that its massive congestion problems in Southern California are over and that nationwide it's continuing to recover from a breakdown in service that sparked a shipping crisis last spring. "UP is no longer suffering from congestion in California," the railroad said in its biweekly filing with the U.S. Surface Transportation Board. Nationwide, "UP achieved its highest level of performance in more than a year."
BUSINESS
August 1, 1998 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A national shipping crisis arising from massive congestion on the Union Pacific railroad system has eased enough that the freight carrier no longer needs intense federal oversight, regulators said Friday. But Union Pacific itself said the problems--which included severe delays at Southern California's seaports and at Union Pacific's big switching yard in Colton--are by no means fixed, and that the job of restoring service to normal levels "is far from finished."
BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | Washington Post
The Surface Transportation Board, seeking to end severe rail service problems in Texas and the Gulf Coast, said it will consider whether to order sale of parts of the newly merged Union Pacific and Southern Pacific railroads to competitors. If the board eventually concludes that major sales are needed, it will mark one of the rare instances in which federal regulators have ordered even a partial breakup of a rail merger.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | Associated Press
Except for about 250 miles from Houston to New Orleans, service on Union Pacific's 36,000 miles of track is almost back to normal, the chairman of the Dallas-based company said. At the height of the railroad's congestion, westbound trains were lined up from Los Angeles to Phoenix waiting to get into Southern California. But Union Pacific Chairman Richard Davidson said the congestion has been resolved and trains are moving smoothly through the West.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1997 | RUSS LOAR
City leaders say they expect a final agreement next month with Union Pacific on a plan to repair badly deteriorating railroad crossings throughout the city. "Shortly after the first of the year, we expect to conclude a formal agreement with the [Union Pacific] railroad to improve all of the crossings in the city," City Manager Terry Matz said.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The Union Pacific Railroad is going far to prove that the private sector cannot be relied on to serve the public interest. The unprecedented delays and mounting losses for shippers through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach due to the railroad's mismanagement in the aftermath of its 1996 merger with the Southern Pacific are disgraceful--and extremely costly. "This is the worst congestion we've ever had," says Don Wylie, director of trade for the Port of Long Beach.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
The U.S. military has stopped using Union Pacific Railroad because of delays that have backed up freight and left a shipment of M-1 tanks unguarded. The nation's largest railroad, which used to haul more military goods than any other railroad, said it had already stopped handling 90% of its military shipments on its own because of the service problems. "We knew we could not meet the service requirements," railroad spokesman John Bromley said.
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