Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnion Teachers
IN THE NEWS

Union Teachers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 11, 1987
Union teachers in Marquette, Mich., went back to school, but strikes that have affected 700,000 students in seven states dragged on and talks appeared deadlocked in the two largest walkouts in Chicago and Detroit. More than 55,000 teachers and support staff were on strike in 22 school districts in Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Washington state.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 26, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Nearly two weeks into a political standoff, tens of thousands rallied in Madison and in dozens of cities around the nation to oppose a bill that would severely limit collective bargaining rights for most Wisconsin public employees. Joel DeSpain, spokesman for the Madison Police Department, said the rally ? in steadily falling snow ? drew between 70,000 and 100,000 and may have been the largest protest in Madison since the Vietnam War. "I've been around Madison for 50 years, and I have not seen anything like it so far," he said.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989
Saying that substantial constitutional questions are involved, a Superior Court judge Tuesday delayed a decision on whether the Los Angeles Unified School District can legally withhold paychecks from thousands of teachers. Judge Dzintra Janavs said she would rule on the matter Friday. As a pressure tactic in a year-old contract dispute, thousands of union teachers have refused to turn in grades to the district, and instead have given marks directly to students on union report cards. School Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy
Fifteen special interest groups including casino operators, drug firms and unions for teachers and public employees spent more than $1 billion in the last decade trying to influence California voters and officials, the state's political watchdog agency reported Wednesday. The money from the top 15 spenders went to lobbying, contributions to state politicians, and campaigns for ballot measures that advanced the groups' agendas, according to the report by the state Fair Political Practices Commission.
NEWS
April 24, 1989 | From Times wire services
Union teachers, setting the stage for the first public schools strike in Los Angeles since 1970, voted overwhelmingly to walk out May 30 unless a contract impasse with the district is resolved, union leaders said today. Wayne Johnson, president of United Teachers-Los Angeles, announced at a news conference 86.5% of the 20,137 union members who cast ballots last week voted to strike. "This is not saber-rattling," Johnson said. "Unless there's a settlement by May 29, there will be a strike in the City of Los Angeles."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1985
It is most unfortunate when one of the finest principals in the system is suddenly branded a "bad administrator" and is removed from a school by officials who seem to have bowed to the desires of the United Teachers of Los Angeles. It seems odd in an era when parents and others are demanding higher standards of behavior, homework and academics that school officials would remove principals who are strong in those areas. In particular I am familiar and concerned with the situation regarding Barbara Roe, the former principal of Riverside Elementary.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2011 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Nearly two weeks into a political standoff, tens of thousands rallied in Madison and in dozens of cities around the nation to oppose a bill that would severely limit collective bargaining rights for most Wisconsin public employees. Joel DeSpain, spokesman for the Madison Police Department, said the rally ? in steadily falling snow ? drew between 70,000 and 100,000 and may have been the largest protest in Madison since the Vietnam War. "I've been around Madison for 50 years, and I have not seen anything like it so far," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1989 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, Times Staff Writer
Britta Sandelman wants to be a teacher. Luckily for her, the Los Angeles Unified School District faces a chronic shortage of teachers every fall, with up to 3,000 open positions. Under a 4-year-old teacher-training program, qualified college graduates can start teaching full time after some quick instruction, earning a credential after two years on the job. But as Sandelman walked into an orientation meeting at the district's downtown headquarters Saturday, the 22-year-old UCLA graduate stepped into the middle of an acrimonious feud between the administration and the teachers' union.
NEWS
May 14, 1989 | LARRY GORDON and SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writers
With a strike deadline only a day away, union teachers and the Los Angeles Unified School District remained deadlocked Saturday on the issue of pay increases and leaders of both sides said a strike now appears likely. Wayne Johnson, president of United Teachers-Los Angeles, said the chances of a strike on Monday now are "99.9%" and that "it would take a minor miracle" to avert one. School board President Roberta Weintraub said, "I am going to assume that on Monday morning a strike will occur."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2004 | Steve Lopez
I wasn't even trying to get under their skin. But not since Sister Roberta smacked me in the head with a sixth-grade spelling workbook have I so enraged the teaching profession. This would be understandable if I had beaten up on teachers. But I barely mentioned them last week in a column about the stalled progress on math and English test scores for California's public school children.
OPINION
September 7, 2009
Even with signs that the U.S. economy might be stirring, this is a strained Labor Day for the many Americans who are going without raises, and whose hours are being cut at the same time that they are asked to take heavier workloads -- and especially for those who are without employment. Teachers find themselves in all these categories, across the nation and right here, where the dire financial condition of the Los Angeles Unified School District has led to layoffs or demotions from regular teaching to substitute, and where class sizes will be larger and other cutbacks will reduce salaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2009 | SANDY BANKS
One thing I've learned in 30 years of covering education is that every dispute, demand or decree rests on one claim: We must do this for the children. That's why the teachers union tried to stage a one-day strike to protest budget cuts this week -- to "save the children," said United Teachers Los Angeles President A.J. Duffy. And it's why district leaders went to court to block them -- to protect the "student safety," said Supt. Ramon C. Cortines.
OPINION
February 11, 2008
As the first debate got underway, 16 candidates sat at the front of the multipurpose room at Grover Cleveland High School. Facing them were 16 audience members scattered among 240 chairs set in neat rows. Right there, that could be the biggest challenge confronting United Teachers Los Angeles, which has seven officer positions open. Who can blame teachers who've stood in front of a classroom all day for deciding against an evening jaunt to Reseda to attend the debate?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2004 | Steve Lopez
I wasn't even trying to get under their skin. But not since Sister Roberta smacked me in the head with a sixth-grade spelling workbook have I so enraged the teaching profession. This would be understandable if I had beaten up on teachers. But I barely mentioned them last week in a column about the stalled progress on math and English test scores for California's public school children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2000
Re "County's Teachers Won't Say No to New Tax Credit," July 7. It was stated that "the tax credits, which range from $250 for teachers with four years' experience to $1,500 for 20-year veterans, are meant to reimburse educators for the out-of-pocket cash they spend each year on school supplies." I don't think so. Am I to believe that a 20-year teacher spends six times what a 4-year teacher spends when they teach the same classes? What the tax credits really amount to are bribes to get unions to make political contributions and to get votes from teachers.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The president of the California Teachers Assn. on Saturday urged the group's 280,000 members to teach according to the provisions of Proposition 227, the controversial anti-bilingual education initiative passed by voters last week. But union officials also made it clear that teachers who are sued under the terms of the proposition for "curricular malpractice"--meaning that they fail to use enough English in the classroom--will be aggressively defended by the union in court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2009 | SANDY BANKS
One thing I've learned in 30 years of covering education is that every dispute, demand or decree rests on one claim: We must do this for the children. That's why the teachers union tried to stage a one-day strike to protest budget cuts this week -- to "save the children," said United Teachers Los Angeles President A.J. Duffy. And it's why district leaders went to court to block them -- to protect the "student safety," said Supt. Ramon C. Cortines.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1989 | S. J. DIAMOND
The teachers of Los Angeles' Unified School District went on strike May 15 for more money and, 11 days later, got it. The dispute was the ultimate consumer issue. Taxpayers pay for the school system, taxpayers (or their children) consume the schooling, and consumers (parents and children) were inconvenienced by the strike--the very intention of the strikers, who wanted parents to force the district to grant their demands. Except for manipulating their customers, management and workers treated their problems as a labor dispute, a periodic squabble at the plant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE and JOHN POPE and MIMI KO CRUZ
Two Fullerton Union High School teachers, Ted Kopacki and Barbara Clark, have been designated exceptional high school teachers. The honor came from UC San Diego's Outstanding Teacher Recognition Program, which allows university students to nominate teachers who influenced them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Teachers union officials said Thursday that a seemingly generous offer from the Orange Unified School District to raise salaries has serious pitfalls for their more experienced teachers. A raise offered in closed-door negotiations by district administrators this week would give some teachers a 30% increase over the next three years. But the offer only applies to teachers who are not eligible for lifetime retiree benefits. The bulk of teachers in the district are being offered a raise of about 4.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|