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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Bridges' trademark caps, his fighting spirit speeches and--most significant--the staunchly pro-union sentiment he injected into ports from San Diego to Seattle will be on proud display in San Pedro next week. The legendary labor leader, who built the International Longshoremen and Warehousemen's Union into a position of supremacy on West Coast docks, has been dead for a decade.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2005 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
By the narrowest margin in union history, Los Angeles teachers have voted to ratify a new contract that will give them a 2% raise and more say in hiring and assignment decisions, union officials said Friday. Teachers voted 54.05% to 45.95% to approve the contract, ending a months-long impasse that at one point had them refusing to supervise extracurricular activities, tutor students or do work outside their contract obligations in an effort to pressure Supt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1996
What 104-year-old Bessie Cohen still remembers is the running. "Everybody was running, trying to get out," said Cohen, the last survivor of the 1911 New York City factory fire that killed at least 146 garment workers. "And there was this beautiful little girl, my friend, Dora. I remember her face before she jumped." It was 85 years ago, on March 25, 1911, that flames ripped through the 10-story Triangle Shirtwaist Co. factory on Manhattan's lower Eastside.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | TIM RUTTEN
History is a wily dealer. When it slapped down the same-sex marriage issue in San Francisco three weeks ago, it handed a wild card not only to President Bush and Sen. John Kerry but also to the mainstream American news media. The question for the Republican incumbent, his presumptive Democratic challenger and the media is this: Is the country witnessing the birth of a broad new civil rights movement or a countercultural insurgency?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We saw the smoke pouring out of the building. We got there just as they started to jump. . . . They came down in twos and threes, jumping together in a kind of desperate hope. The life nets were broken. The firemen kept shouting for them not to jump. But they had no choice; the flames were right behind them. --Frances Perkins, Secretary of Labor under Franklin D. Roosevelt and eyewitness to Triangle Shirtwaist Co. fire of 1911 What 104-year- old Bessie Cohen still remembers is the running.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | TIM RUTTEN
History is a wily dealer. When it slapped down the same-sex marriage issue in San Francisco three weeks ago, it handed a wild card not only to President Bush and Sen. John Kerry but also to the mainstream American news media. The question for the Republican incumbent, his presumptive Democratic challenger and the media is this: Is the country witnessing the birth of a broad new civil rights movement or a countercultural insurgency?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1993 | SHAWN HUBLER
The "foodski, funski and brewski" are gone-ski. Gorky's is kaput. Twelve years after downtown's best-known bohemian hangout opened in the name of cheap java for the working class, Gorky's Cafe and Russian Brewery has quietly shut down, leaving nothing but the coffeepot and a bill for back rent. "So Long, L.A.," reads the sign on the window. "They done cleared out," nodded a panhandler in a nearby cardboard box.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2005 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
By the narrowest margin in union history, Los Angeles teachers have voted to ratify a new contract that will give them a 2% raise and more say in hiring and assignment decisions, union officials said Friday. Teachers voted 54.05% to 45.95% to approve the contract, ending a months-long impasse that at one point had them refusing to supervise extracurricular activities, tutor students or do work outside their contract obligations in an effort to pressure Supt.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2004 | Mike Anton, Times Staff Writer
Throughout most of human history, a man married a woman out of desire -- for her father's goats, perhaps. Marriage was a business arrangement. The bride was a commodity, her dowry a deal sweetener. And the groom was likely to be an unwitting pawn in an economic alliance between two families. A church may or may not have been involved. Government was out of the loop. There was no paperwork, no possibility of divorce, and -- more often than not -- no romance.
OPINION
September 9, 2013 | By Meredith Kleykamp and Jake Rosenfeld
Over the next few days, the largest national group of unions, the AFL-CIO, meets in Los Angeles to look at ways to stem the long-term decline of American unions. African Americans and other people of color have a lot at stake. Many people think of a union member as a white, blue-collar male, and historically that was true. In the early 1900s, nearly all U.S. unions discriminated against African Americans and refused to let them join. In 1935, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Wagner Act into law - guaranteeing American workers the right to bargain collectively with their employers - fewer than 1 in 100 union members in the U.S. was an African American.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Harry Bridges' trademark caps, his fighting spirit speeches and--most significant--the staunchly pro-union sentiment he injected into ports from San Diego to Seattle will be on proud display in San Pedro next week. The legendary labor leader, who built the International Longshoremen and Warehousemen's Union into a position of supremacy on West Coast docks, has been dead for a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1996
What 104-year-old Bessie Cohen still remembers is the running. "Everybody was running, trying to get out," said Cohen, the last survivor of the 1911 New York City factory fire that killed at least 146 garment workers. "And there was this beautiful little girl, my friend, Dora. I remember her face before she jumped." It was 85 years ago, on March 25, 1911, that flames ripped through the 10-story Triangle Shirtwaist Co. factory on Manhattan's lower Eastside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1996 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We saw the smoke pouring out of the building. We got there just as they started to jump. . . . They came down in twos and threes, jumping together in a kind of desperate hope. The life nets were broken. The firemen kept shouting for them not to jump. But they had no choice; the flames were right behind them. --Frances Perkins, Secretary of Labor under Franklin D. Roosevelt and eyewitness to Triangle Shirtwaist Co. fire of 1911 What 104-year- old Bessie Cohen still remembers is the running.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1993 | SHAWN HUBLER
The "foodski, funski and brewski" are gone-ski. Gorky's is kaput. Twelve years after downtown's best-known bohemian hangout opened in the name of cheap java for the working class, Gorky's Cafe and Russian Brewery has quietly shut down, leaving nothing but the coffeepot and a bill for back rent. "So Long, L.A.," reads the sign on the window. "They done cleared out," nodded a panhandler in a nearby cardboard box.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
When board members of the Screen Actors Guild meet this weekend, they probably will take a historic step toward merging with their smaller sister union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. The SAG board is expected to endorse a mission statement for the future consolidated union — a statement that was recently approved by leaders of each group — and to create a committee that will develop a plan to make the marriage a reality. AFTRA's board is expected to take similar action in mid-May.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Certain movies engage your affections so strongly that, even if they start to fall apart, you tend to keep rooting for them. That's pretty much the case with "Newsies" (citywide). It's a big, bright, rousing period musical and its subject--the 1899 New York City newsboys' strike --makes it an anachronism.
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