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Unions Labor Relations

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BUSINESS
September 18, 1992 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal mediator said Thursday that leaders of five Disneyland unions will put a new contract to another vote next week. Union members Tuesday rejected the proposed three-year agreement. The unions would not divulge the exact tally, but workers said the vote was not close: 700 in favor and 950, or nearly 60%, against.
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NEWS
February 13, 1998
Alfred Hale Caplan, 79, a labor relations consultant who aided Cesar Chavez. A native of Chicago, Caplan grew up in Los Angeles and began working as a truck driver for Thrifty Drug. He soon became a shop steward and then a leader of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, which represented workers at Thrifty, and by age 22, was an international organizing representative.
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NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Financially ailing New York City and two of its biggest unions reached agreement on a retroactive 15-month contract that calls for a 3.5% pay hike for the first year and an additional 1% for the remaining three months. Mayor David N. Dinkins also told a City Hall news conference that a wage freeze would be imposed when the new contracts expire later this year. The contract is not expected to widen the city's expected budget gap of about $1.6 billion for the fiscal year beginning in July, 1991.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1992 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal mediator said Thursday that leaders of five Disneyland unions will put a new contract to another vote next week. Union members Tuesday rejected the proposed three-year agreement. The unions would not divulge the exact tally, but workers said the vote was not close: 700 in favor and 950, or nearly 60%, against.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1992 | HELAINE OLEN
The plan to slash city employees' salaries 10% by furloughing them without pay every Friday passed another hurdle Thursday when the largest of the affected employee groups voted to accept the cut rather than face layoffs. The Professional, Technical and Clerical Assn. voted to approve the plan by an overwhelming majority, said Irene Carney, the president of its local chapter. "I think people felt that it would give them nine months to prepare for pain ahead," Carney said.
NEWS
February 13, 1998
Alfred Hale Caplan, 79, a labor relations consultant who aided Cesar Chavez. A native of Chicago, Caplan grew up in Los Angeles and began working as a truck driver for Thrifty Drug. He soon became a shop steward and then a leader of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, which represented workers at Thrifty, and by age 22, was an international organizing representative.
OPINION
November 12, 2008 | Douglas Olin, Douglas Olin was a deputy assistant secretary of Commerce in the Clinton administration.
One of the first real challenges President-elect Barack Obama faces will be what to do about the ailing American auto giants. The stakes are high. For more than 100 years, the Big Three automakers have been a cornerstone of the U.S. economy and an important symbol of American industrial might. The auto industry is the largest manufacturing industry in America. And it's not just the 239,341 employees of Chrysler, Ford and GM.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1992 | HELAINE OLEN
The plan to slash city employees' salaries 10% by furloughing them without pay every Friday passed another hurdle Thursday when the largest of the affected employee groups voted to accept the cut rather than face layoffs. The Professional, Technical and Clerical Assn. voted to approve the plan by an overwhelming majority, said Irene Carney, the president of its local chapter. "I think people felt that it would give them nine months to prepare for pain ahead," Carney said.
NEWS
January 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Financially ailing New York City and two of its biggest unions reached agreement on a retroactive 15-month contract that calls for a 3.5% pay hike for the first year and an additional 1% for the remaining three months. Mayor David N. Dinkins also told a City Hall news conference that a wage freeze would be imposed when the new contracts expire later this year. The contract is not expected to widen the city's expected budget gap of about $1.6 billion for the fiscal year beginning in July, 1991.
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