Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnions United States
IN THE NEWS

Unions United States

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition representing big employers and some major labor unions warned Tuesday that the budget-balancing plan approved by Congress could "add almost 8 million people to the ranks of the uninsured and shift $85 billion in costs to the private sector." The National Leadership Coalition on Health Care, which counts Chrysler Corp., Ford Motor Co., Ralphs Grocery Co., Safeway Inc. and Southern California Edison Co.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A coalition representing big employers and some major labor unions warned Tuesday that the budget-balancing plan approved by Congress could "add almost 8 million people to the ranks of the uninsured and shift $85 billion in costs to the private sector." The National Leadership Coalition on Health Care, which counts Chrysler Corp., Ford Motor Co., Ralphs Grocery Co., Safeway Inc. and Southern California Edison Co.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
German Union to Fight BMW Non-Union U.S. Plant: Germany's huge metalworkers' union said it will fight BMW's plan to build a new auto factory in South Carolina without union representation for the workers. IG Metall, which claims that its 3.6 million members make it the biggest union in the Western world, accused BMW of deciding to build in the United States on political rather than economic grounds, to the detriment of Germany's industrial base. It said it would cooperate with the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
German Union to Fight BMW Non-Union U.S. Plant: Germany's huge metalworkers' union said it will fight BMW's plan to build a new auto factory in South Carolina without union representation for the workers. IG Metall, which claims that its 3.6 million members make it the biggest union in the Western world, accused BMW of deciding to build in the United States on political rather than economic grounds, to the detriment of Germany's industrial base. It said it would cooperate with the U.S.
SPORTS
July 21, 1986 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union, which dominated the inaugural Goodwill Games, ended the competition with a flourish Sunday, capturing 13 gold medals and finishing with 99 more medals than the United States. The games, billed as a battle of the superpowers, was a mismatch, as the powerful Soviets overwhelmed the Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1987 | GERALD F. UELMEN, Gerald F. Uelmen is dean of Santa Clara University School of Law.
The Supreme Court nomination of Judge Anthony Kennedy will focus attention on the published opinions he has authored during 12 years as a judge of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Unlike the District of Columbia Circuit, where Judges Robert H. Bork and Douglas Ginsburg both sit, the 9th Circuit handles a broad array of criminal and civil litigation. It is the largest of the federal circuit courts and includes nine Far Western states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2009 | William Nottingham
Should the city of Los Angeles become a national leader in the generation of renewable solar energy, as a March 3 ballot measure proposes? Or would it be too costly to put 400 megawatts' worth of photovoltaic cells on roofs and parking lots across town? Times editors recently asked the 10 mayoral candidates about the solar energy charter amendment, Measure B. Here are excerpts of their responses. Do you support Measure B, the city's proposed solar power initiative? Why?
BUSINESS
September 8, 1995 | MARTHA BRYSON HODEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joann Henry worked at Dixie-Narco Corp.'s plant in Ranson for more than 10 years, building vending machines and earning as much as $11.45 an hour with "wonderful health insurance and all kinds of benefits." * Today, she works 33 hours a week as a liquor store clerk--for $5.50 an hour. Period. In 1991, Dixie-Narco closed its West Virginia plant and moved to Williston, S.C., where wages averaged $6 an hour less.
SPORTS
July 21, 1986 | Associated Press
The Soviet Union, which dominated the inaugural Goodwill Games, ended the competition with a flourish Sunday, capturing 13 gold medals and finishing with 99 more medals than the United States. The games, billed as a battle of the superpowers, was a mismatch, as the powerful Soviets overwhelmed the Americans.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|