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OPINION
May 27, 2006
Re "The end of 'more,' " Opinion, May 22 I'm happy to find that former Sen. George McGovern is still thinking clearly. He expresses dismay at the union leaders continuing the John L. Lewis philosophy of always wanting "more." I agree with his contention that in this new competitive environment, union leaders, particularly in the automotive and airline industries, need to back off and work with company executives and remain competitive. The only alternative is to go out of business.
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OPINION
January 31, 2009
Re "Power in the union," Opinion, Jan. 26 Robert B. Reich writes of unions as potential saviors for our current economic downturn. At 64, I am old enough to remember growing up in Fairless Hills, Penn., a town constructed by U.S. Steel in the early 1950s to house workers for a new steel plant near Philadelphia. The Steelworkers Union then obtained great benefits for its members. A menial job at "the mill" for a high school graduate paid double what my father, a high school teacher, earned.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1990 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Union strength in the workplace has dwindled, but, not satisfied with that, many Republicans are now pressing for legislation to weaken labor's still impressive strength in the political arena. The goal is to blunt the increasingly sharp political tools that unions use to get their nearly 20 million members to vote for labor-endorsed candidates, most of whom are Democrats.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1994
Regarding "Can He Do Side-Splitting Action?," David Kronke's interview with writer-director James Cameron (July 17): The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employes, representing more than 24,000 members in Southern California who are engaged in the "below-the- line" crafts on motion picture productions, deeply resents James Cameron's statement to The Times. Quoting from your story: "They really stuck it to us," he says of the unions. "But I'm not gonna be stuck twice.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
U.S. labor unions are losing members faster than they can recruit new ones as membership declined by 280,000 employees in 2002 to 16.1 million, the Labor Department said. Last year 13.2% of U.S. workers belonged to a union, a decline from 13.4% in 2001 and 20.1% in 1983, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
BOOKS
August 11, 1991
I enjoyed Samuel G. Freedman's review of Stephen Fraser's "Labor Will Rule" (July 21), except for the first two paragraphs in which he seems anxious to portray present-day unions in a negative light. These opening remarks by a reviewer of great writing skills and stature in literary circles puts him in a class of thinkers who are, seemingly, eager to see the unions die and to write their obituary. It was my good fortune to have worked closely with union leaders in our Southern California urban megalopolis for 34 years--1937-1971--including the leaders of the Sidney Hillman Labor Center in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and Catherine Saillant
Months after much of organized labor fought hard to block his election as mayor of Los Angeles, Eric Garcetti tried to mend fences Wednesday with a call for solidarity with unions in their struggle for more jobs that pay middle-class wages. “Now more than ever, our fight must be for more than just jobs,” Garcetti told hundreds of union leaders at a national AFL-CIO convention in downtown Los Angeles. “It must be for good jobs - jobs that don't just pay rent, but that help you buy a home, jobs that don't just pay the bills, but that can send your children to college.” Maria Elena Durazo, the Los Angeles County Labor Federation leader who ran a major independent campaign against Garcetti in the May election, welcomed the mayor's remarks, saying unions were focused on the tasks ahead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2013 | By Jason Wells
Bay Area Rapid Transit's two largest unions this week ratified the new labor agreements that ended a four-day regional rail strike in October. In a statement posted on BART's website Saturday, officials said the new four-year agreements would address the growing cost of employee benefits while allowing the agency to modernize an aging infrastructure. “The Bay Area and our riders will benefit from these contracts because BART will be able to move forward with the replacement of our aging fleet of train cars and the needed upgrades to meet demand,” BART General Manager Grace Crunican said in a statement.
WORLD
September 2, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon and Kylé Pienaar, Los Angeles Times
A strike by 1.3 million South African public servants threatened Thursday to drag on for a third week as unions signaled that they would reject the government's latest compromise offer, a wage hike that would be more than double the rate of inflation. Zwelinzima Vavi, secretary-general of the main trade union federation, COSATU, said his organization had rejected the offer but that talks continued. Unions representing nurses, health and education workers, and police also said they would reject the offer, and other unions said they would follow suit in the coming days.
NEWS
December 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
Chinese police detained a man who had been organizing factory workers' efforts to form an independent union, sending him to a psychiatric hospital, a human rights group said Saturday. Electrician Cao Maobing was committed Friday to Yancheng city's No. 4 Psychiatric Hospital, said the Information Center for Human Rights and Democracy. Cao had been leading unionization efforts by 300 workers at a state-owned silk factory in the eastern province of Jiangsu.
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