Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnison
IN THE NEWS

Unison

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Unison movement is one of the most deeply satisfying creative strategies in all of dance, connecting performers to something greater than themselves and audiences to impulses underpinning the most ancient and profound societal rituals. The 16th installment of "Spectrum: Dance in L.A.," at the Ivar Theatre on Saturday, provided a coincidental survey of the technical and expressive possibilities of unison, with most of the 14 companies and pieces on view focused on nothing else.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
December 19, 2010 | By Baxter Holmes
Reporting from Lawrence, Kan. ? At halftime against No. 3 Kansas here Saturday, USC was staring at a double-digit deficit with Allen Fieldhouse rocking as usual. A shameful exit, as is custom for most of Kansas' visitors, seemed certain. After all, points aside, USC also trailed Kansas in talent, skill and athleticism. But midway through the second half, the Trojans used an 11-0 run to take the lead after trailing by 11 at the half, turning a potential blowout into a nail-biting thriller, which USC eventually lost, 70-68.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1989
In response to "Big Boy Bowing Out: Original Glendale Diner Serves Its Last Burger After 51 Years," Metro, Oct. 17: During the 1950s Bob's was a large drive-in restaurant popular with young people as a hang-out "American Graffiti" style. About 1958, a novelty song was frequently played on the radio about a Nash Rambler behind a Cadillac; much horn honking was integrated into the music. The young people, one night, all listening to the same station on their car radios, proceeded to honk their horns in collective unison.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2008 | Victoria Looseleaf, Looseleaf is a freelance writer.
Surviving in these tough economic times requires not only thick-skinned fortitude but a mega-dose of ingenuity. But the performing arts, especially dance, teeter on the edge as a matter of course. Consider grass-roots dance companies with limited resources. How else can they gain broader audiences if not by taking their shows on the road? That, at any rate, is the strategy being pursued by Cid Pearlman, creator of the California Touring Project.
NEWS
December 6, 1994
What pleases me most is curling up with my husband--lying quietly and listening to our hearts beat in unison. We're getting grayer, our centers of gravity have shifted and we see more doctors, but we still know how to spend downtime together. Luckily, his favorite way is the same as mine--wrapped in each other's arms and whispering that we will love each other forever . . . and one more day. --PENELOPE GAMBLE, Los Angeles
NATIONAL
January 22, 2004
This is the speech that Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean gave to supporters at the Val Air Ballroom in West Des Moines on Monday night, shortly after learning he had placed third among four leading candidates in the Iowa caucuses. Dean: Well, you guys, you have already got the picture here. I was about to say, you know, I'm sure there are some disappointed people here.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES
You can't say the program doesn't warn you. There, right under the title of Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Yeomen of the Guard," is a quote from a second-act duet: "Tell a tale of cock and bull." Forget about poignancy. Forget about heartbreak. Forget about the dramatic depth and humanity that initially worried poor Gilbert, making him fear he had strayed too far from comic-opera formulas.
SPORTS
July 5, 2002 | Ross Newhan
He is 85, in the 20th summer of retirement, and his voice and opinions in support of the union he built into one of the country's most powerful remain as firm as ever, as rigidly insistent as at any time in his 16 years as executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Assn.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1997 | Reuters
International Business Machines Corp.'s Tivoli Systems subsidiary will buy Santa Clara-based Unison Software for about $170 million, the companies said. Under terms of the agreement, each share of Unison common stock will be converted into $15 cash or IBM common stock, the statement said. Shareholders may choose to take up to about half the total value in cash.
NEWS
July 2, 1987 | Associated Press
A C-130 cargo plane performing a tank-dropping maneuver crashed and burned on a dirt runway Wednesday, killing five servicemen but stopping 100 yards short of bleachers filled with spectators. Four of six Air Force crewmen on the plane were killed, as well as an Army soldier on the ground, said Capt. Brian Irving of Pope Air Force Base, where the four-engine turboprop was based. The two survivors were being transferred to Brooke Army Medical Center at Ft. Sam Houston, Tex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2008 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
Early on a late September morning, if all goes according to plan, 1 million Mormons, Catholics, Jews, Muslims, evangelical Christians, Sikhs and Hindus will open their front doors, march down their front walks and plant "Yes on Proposition 8" signs in their yards to show they support repealing same-sex marriage in California. It is a bold idea, one that may be difficult to pull off. But whether or not 1 million lawn signs are planted in unison, the plan underscores what some observers say is one of the most ambitious interfaith political organizing efforts ever attempted in the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2007 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
From every perspective, the Aug. 16 meeting of the Los Angeles Community Redevelopment Agency's Board of Commissioners went badly. Tenants of a building in downtown Los Angeles were furious over multiple evictions, and Commissioner Joan Ling wanted to quiz them about it. Commission President William Jackson, who had just been called Osama bin Laden by one angry audience member, did not. Jackson interrupted Ling, saying the commission needed to move on.
NATIONAL
July 1, 2007 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
One by one, half a dozen Republican presidential hopefuls auditioned Saturday before an Iowa audience of economic and social conservatives, pledging lower taxes, tougher border enforcement and a tighter-fisted approach to federal spending. The candidates also echoed one another in reiterating their opposition to abortion and to legalizing same-sex marriage. "One man. One woman. Lifetime relationship," said former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, who joined former Massachusetts Gov.
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | Stacie Stukin, Special to The Times
IN June 1988, Chuck Stallard showed up to photograph a demonstration by the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power, or ACT UP, on Copa De Oro Road in Bel-Air. The activist group, which became known for theatrical street protests that were infused with wit but fueled by anger, had gathered 70 protesters in front of a house where then Vice President George H.W. Bush was attending a fundraiser to demand that the presidential candidate make AIDS a priority campaign issue.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2004
This is the speech that Democratic presidential candidate Howard Dean gave to supporters at the Val Air Ballroom in West Des Moines on Monday night, shortly after learning he had placed third among four leading candidates in the Iowa caucuses. Dean: Well, you guys, you have already got the picture here. I was about to say, you know, I'm sure there are some disappointed people here.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Unison movement is one of the most deeply satisfying creative strategies in all of dance, connecting performers to something greater than themselves and audiences to impulses underpinning the most ancient and profound societal rituals. The 16th installment of "Spectrum: Dance in L.A.," at the Ivar Theatre on Saturday, provided a coincidental survey of the technical and expressive possibilities of unison, with most of the 14 companies and pieces on view focused on nothing else.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1988 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
In an unusual display of political unity, two Republicans and four Democrats joined together Wednesday to enter the race against the man they all hope to oust from office--Supervisor Mike Antonovich. It was a strange sight as five of the candidates showed up at the Los Angeles County registrar-recorder's office to file their papers together. Because of work obligations, another Democrat filed earlier in the day and a seventh candidate said he will formally enter the nonpartisan race today.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
When cellist Eric Kim returned to the San Diego Symphony last week to perform his half of the solo in Brahms' Double Concerto, it was also a family reunion of sorts. Kim, who was the San Diego Symphony's principal cellist last season, was joined in San Diego by his older brother, Benny, who played the violin solo in the Double Concerto performances. (Last season, the brothers had played the same concerto with the Denver Symphony under Sixten Ehrling.
SPORTS
July 5, 2002 | Ross Newhan
He is 85, in the 20th summer of retirement, and his voice and opinions in support of the union he built into one of the country's most powerful remain as firm as ever, as rigidly insistent as at any time in his 16 years as executive director of the Major League Baseball Players Assn.
SPORTS
June 15, 2000 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 7 a.m. Wednesday in the filtered sunshine on the 18th green at Pebble Beach, it was the moment to officially say goodbye to Payne Stewart for the last time. About 2,000 ticket-holders turned out for the 30-minute ceremony honoring the memory of Stewart, the defending U.S. Open champion whose tragic death along with five others in a private plane crash Oct. 25 shocked the world of professional golf. Trey Holland, president of the U.S. Golf Assn., opened the brief ceremony.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|