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Unit Cohesion

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1998 | M. THOMAS DAVIS, M. Thomas Davis is a retired Army colonel
In the 1989 film "When Harry Met Sally," Billy Crystal proclaims, "Men and women can never be friends, the sex thing always gets in the way." Nowhere is this more on display than in efforts to integrate men and women into the military.
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OPINION
December 21, 2003
How ironic that the 10th anniversary of the military's dreadful "don't ask, don't tell" policy fell just months after the U.S. Supreme Court forcefully overturned state laws criminalizing consensual sex between homosexuals. A majority of the high court recognizes what pollsters find, that "straight" Americans have grown more tolerant toward homosexuality. But not the military brass.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2008 | Vimal Patel, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. military is being harmed by prohibiting gays and lesbians from serving openly, a congressional panel was told Wednesday, the first time lawmakers have examined the "don't ask, don't tell" policy since the law was passed in 1993.
WORLD
June 4, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Military investigators have concluded that some airstrikes that killed civilians during a battle in western Afghanistan last month were mistakes, but are still trying to determine whether the service members who called in the strikes could have known they were no longer in imminent danger when the bombs were dropped. The investigation questioned the last two airstrikes conducted during the 8 1/2 -hour battle, according to a military official familiar with the inquiry.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
A vote in the Senate on Saturday cleared the way to abolish the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy. But questions remain about how the change will be implemented, and it will be months before gays and lesbians can serve openly in the military. What happens next? President Obama is expected to sign the measure this week. The president, secretary of Defense and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff must then sign a letter certifying that the necessary policy and regulation changes have been prepared and that implementation of the changes won't hurt the military's readiness, effectiveness, recruiting, retention or unit cohesion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Eugene Nickerson, the first judge to strike down the "don't ask, don't tell" policy for gays in the U.S. military and who presided over the Abner Louima police brutality trials, has died. He was 83. Nickerson, who served 24 years in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, died Tuesday of complications from ulcer surgery at St. Luke's Hospital in Manhattan.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Thursday struck down as unconstitutional the government's "don't ask, don't tell" policy that allows gay men and lesbians to serve in the military only if they keep their sexual orientation to themselves. Ruling in the case of six homosexual service members, U.S. District Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of Brooklyn held that the controversial policy violated their rights to free speech and equal protection under the law.
NEWS
May 4, 2003 | Eric Talmadge, Associated Press Writer
It was one of those fateful meetings. Staff Sgt. Evelyn Sosatoledo was working at the housing office on Kadena Air Base in southern Japan, where she had been stationed for about three years, when a friend she knew from Utah walked in. They recognized each other immediately, and old feelings started coming back. Dating, however, was out of the question. Ledell S. Joiner was a civilian when he first met Sosatoledo years before in Salt Lake City.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
As the Obama administration moves to end the ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the military, the Pentagon is still grappling with major questions about how it will integrate them into the ranks. President Obama notified Congress on Friday that the ban would be abolished on Sept. 20 and said that it could be done without harming the military's readiness. Congress required the certification when it voted in December to repeal the 17-year-old policy that requires discharging openly gay and lesbian service members.
NATIONAL
August 15, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
FT. HOOD, Texas - A military appeals court Wednesday stayed the trial of accused Ft. Hood shooter Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan after judges found that forcibly shaving Hasan, as a military judge had ordered, would violate his religious freedom. The United States Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, a panel of four civilian judges appointed by the president and based in Washington, issued the order at the same time Hasan was appearing in court at the sprawling Army base in central Texas.
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