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Unit Cohesion

NATIONAL
December 20, 2010 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
A vote in the Senate on Saturday cleared the way to abolish the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy. But questions remain about how the change will be implemented, and it will be months before gays and lesbians can serve openly in the military. What happens next? President Obama is expected to sign the measure this week. The president, secretary of Defense and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff must then sign a letter certifying that the necessary policy and regulation changes have been prepared and that implementation of the changes won't hurt the military's readiness, effectiveness, recruiting, retention or unit cohesion.
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WORLD
June 4, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Military investigators have concluded that some airstrikes that killed civilians during a battle in western Afghanistan last month were mistakes, but are still trying to determine whether the service members who called in the strikes could have known they were no longer in imminent danger when the bombs were dropped. The investigation questioned the last two airstrikes conducted during the 8 1/2 -hour battle, according to a military official familiar with the inquiry.
OPINION
February 15, 2002 | PHILLIP CARTER, Phillip Carter, who attends UCLA Law School, was a captain in the Army's military police from 1997 to 2001.
When I was a military police platoon leader, I wanted to buy spare tires for all seven of my platoon's Humvees. Spare tires made them more effective in combat exercises because troops could change a tire after running over a rock or barbed wire rather than wait for a maintenance vehicle to come forward with a new tire. But a Humvee tire cost $623, and there was no money in my unit's budget for spares.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1998 | M. THOMAS DAVIS, M. Thomas Davis is a retired Army colonel
In the 1989 film "When Harry Met Sally," Billy Crystal proclaims, "Men and women can never be friends, the sex thing always gets in the way." Nowhere is this more on display than in efforts to integrate men and women into the military.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2008 | Vimal Patel, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. military is being harmed by prohibiting gays and lesbians from serving openly, a congressional panel was told Wednesday, the first time lawmakers have examined the "don't ask, don't tell" policy since the law was passed in 1993.
NEWS
October 21, 2001 | MICHELLE LOCKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
At military bases across the country, troops mobilized for America's new war are saying goodbye to spouses and sweethearts with lingering embraces and teary kisses. Unless they're gay. Homosexuals reporting for possible combat are bound by the "don't ask, don't tell" mandate to keep their sexual orientation to themselves. "There are moments that bring this policy into sharper focus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court late Friday temporarily suspended its ban on enforcement of the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, reversing course for the second time this month on how and when the Pentagon must stop discharging gay soldiers and sailors. The Justice Department had argued in a motion filed Thursday with the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that congressional action last year setting out a path toward eventual repeal of "don't ask, don't tell" should be allowed to run its course without intervention from the courts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
Eugene Nickerson, the first judge to strike down the "don't ask, don't tell" policy for gays in the U.S. military and who presided over the Abner Louima police brutality trials, has died. He was 83. Nickerson, who served 24 years in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn, died Tuesday of complications from ulcer surgery at St. Luke's Hospital in Manhattan.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge Thursday struck down as unconstitutional the government's "don't ask, don't tell" policy that allows gay men and lesbians to serve in the military only if they keep their sexual orientation to themselves. Ruling in the case of six homosexual service members, U.S. District Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of Brooklyn held that the controversial policy violated their rights to free speech and equal protection under the law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1998 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Loopholes in city inspection procedures and basic communication errors among firefighters contributed to the death of a Los Angeles City fire captain who was killed inside a burning South-Central factory in March, according to city officials and a report released Wednesday. The Fire Department's investigation paints a riveting, tragic picture of the 22 minutes that passed between the entry of firefighters into the flaming Pet Center factory, and the moment when a rescue team discovered Capt.
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