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Unitary Tax

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1985
Maybe The Times doesn't care about the jobs for Californians, but I, and many of my colleagues, do. I refer to your editorial (Aug. 22), "Taxing in the Dark." As the author of Senate Bill 85, which would reform the state's unitary tax system, I was surprised to see The Times revert to old-time liberal anti-business rhetoric without understanding the facts and then suggest that we, as legislators, are the ones who are confused. The point of SB 85 is very simple and straightforward.
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BUSINESS
August 18, 2006 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
California's Supreme Court dealt a one-two punch Thursday to out-of-state companies trying to limit their exposure to the Golden State's taxes. In back-to-back rulings in cases involving Microsoft Corp. and General Motors Corp., the court upheld state formulas for determining what non-California corporations pay in taxes. A ruling against the state would have cost California's treasury $500 million in refunds and $100 million annually in lost revenue, state officials said.
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BUSINESS
October 18, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The British government has warned the United States that it is not satisfied with the changes California has made to its "unitary tax" on multinational firms. Britain wants the tax eliminated, the Financial Times reported. The London-based newspaper said the warning came last week in a formal statement to the State Department by Sir Robin Renwick, British ambassador to the United States. Gov. Pete Wilson on Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1994
Whew! California has dodged a $2-billion bullet. Had the state lost this week in a case taken to the U.S. Supreme Court and been made to pay monetary compensation to multinational corporations as a result, the ruling might have been a knockout blow to its already precarious financial condition. On Monday the nation's top court upheld the right of states to collect tax revenues from multinational corporations by the "unitary tax" method.
NEWS
September 4, 1985 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Attempts to negotiate a compromise on heavily lobbied unitary-tax repeal legislation failed Tuesday, leaving the $258-million tax-break proposal for multinational corporations hanging in legislative limbo. The development came when the Assembly Ways and Means Committee battled to a standoff and Republican supporters moved to adjourn the hearing, rather than call a vote on the bill. Assemblyman William P.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday upheld California's use of the so-called unitary taxing method for multinational corporations, a decision that spares the state from paying refunds that could have amounted to nearly $2 billion. But the 7-2 ruling came a year after the state essentially abandoned the taxing approach, which had caused irritation in foreign capitals.
NEWS
August 22, 1985 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian, in a rare break with California business as he heads into a reelection campaign next year, said Wednesday he still supports proposed unitary tax repeal legislation even though state corporate executives contend it would hurt them by providing major tax breaks for foreign competitors. "I doubt very seriously that their fortunes are going to rise or fall based upon the amount of state taxes that they pay," said Deukmejian of the California corporations.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1990 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British-owned Barclays Bank and other multinational corporations doing business in California cheered a state appeals court decision declaring the state's method of unitary taxation unconstitutional. California officials immediately vowed to appeal the ruling issued late Monday by a panel of the 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
In a decision that could help revenue-starved California retain billions of tax dollars, the state Supreme Court on Monday rejected a major challenge to a method used to tax foreign multinational corporations. The court granted an important victory to state officials in rejecting claims by multinational firms, backed by the Bush Administration, that the so-called "unitary tax" improperly interfered with the federal executive branch's authority to conduct foreign policy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1985 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Some of the major international corporations that stand to gain the most from repeal of California's unitary tax system are disputing the payment of millions of dollars in taxes the state claims they owe. Reports of the tax disputes involving these businesses have dribbled out in recent days and are linked to the intense lobbying effort under way at the Capitol to pass unitary tax reform legislation.
NEWS
June 21, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday upheld California's use of the so-called unitary taxing method for multinational corporations, a decision that spares the state from paying refunds that could have amounted to nearly $2 billion. But the 7-2 ruling came a year after the state essentially abandoned the taxing approach, which had caused irritation in foreign capitals.
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a session that bodes well for California's treasury, Supreme Court justices Monday rebuffed arguments that they should restrain the state's use of the unitary tax on multinational corporations. Instead, the justices, in comments from the bench, said that Congress--not the courts--has the authority to impose limits on taxing policy. "We are not the final arbiter of this. The Constitution gave Congress the power to regulate commerce," said Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
OPINION
January 23, 1994
A series of natural disasters has sent shock waves through California's economy in recent years. Now the state may be facing a severe financial test stemming from a U.S. Supreme Court decision. In one of the most important business cases of the court's current term, Barclay's Bank vs. California Franchise Tax Board, the justices will consider the constitutionality of the state's so-called unitary tax rule, which taxes foreign corporations based on their worldwide revenues.
NEWS
November 2, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear a major challenge to California's method of taxing multinational corporations, a move that could cost the state $4 billion in lost revenue. The court's announcement stunned state officials and Clinton Administration lawyers, who had believed that the state Legislature headed off the challenge last month by ending the so-called unitary tax system as of 1994. A day after Gov.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The British government has warned the United States that it is not satisfied with the changes California has made to its "unitary tax" on multinational firms. Britain wants the tax eliminated, the Financial Times reported. The London-based newspaper said the warning came last week in a formal statement to the State Department by Sir Robin Renwick, British ambassador to the United States. Gov. Pete Wilson on Oct.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department urged the Supreme Court on Thursday to dismiss a pending challenge to California's so-called unitary tax on multinational firms, a move that could spare the state from paying as much as $4 billion in refunds. The brief was delivered to the court one day after Gov. Pete Wilson signed legislation that repealed restrictions that had forced most foreign companies operating in California to use the disputed method for calculating their taxes.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1993 | PATRICK LEE
ISSUE: The Legislature last week gutted the state's unitary tax system in response to objections from foreign governments and international companies. The system is an accounting method to assess the state tax obligation of a multinational company operating here, based on its worldwide operations. Companies that pay a fee can opt out of the system. Multinational companies and foreign governments have challenged the system as onerous and unconstitutional.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
About $125 for every man, woman and child in the state. Those are the stakes when the Supreme Court ultimately decides whether California ever had the right to tax multinational corporations based on their worldwide earnings. What's not at stake is whether California will continue to apply this "unitary" taxing method in the future, because the state has already abandoned it unless a company actually prefers the method. No one intends to bring it back, either.
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