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Unitary Tax California

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BUSINESS
October 16, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
The state's newly established trade office in Japan has helped to steer $100 million worth of new investment into California from Asia, Gov. George Deukmejian said Thursday. The governor, who is hosting a two-day Pacific Rim Roundtable in Los Angeles, said the new direct investment will mean about 2,000 new jobs for California workers. Deukmejian made the disclosure in a question-and-answer session with reporters.
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NEWS
June 21, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday upheld California's use of the so-called unitary taxing method for multinational corporations, a decision that spares the state from paying refunds that could have amounted to nearly $2 billion. But the 7-2 ruling came a year after the state essentially abandoned the taxing approach, which had caused irritation in foreign capitals.
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NEWS
June 21, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday upheld California's use of the so-called unitary taxing method for multinational corporations, a decision that spares the state from paying refunds that could have amounted to nearly $2 billion. But the 7-2 ruling came a year after the state essentially abandoned the taxing approach, which had caused irritation in foreign capitals.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Siding with California in a tax case in which $4 billion is at stake, lawyers for the Clinton Administration on Wednesday urged the Supreme Court to uphold the state's use of the so-called "unitary tax" on multinational corporations. The legal brief, filed in the pending case of Barclays Bank vs. California, 92-1384, redeems Clinton's campaign pledge to take a "pro-California" stand in the huge tax dispute, which involves the nation's foreign trading partners.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An appellate court has dealt California another setback in the high-stakes battle to save its so-called "unitary tax" on foreign-based multinational corporations--a ruling that could cost the state hundreds of millions of dollars. The 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento, deciding in favor of London-based Barclays Bank and its California subsidiary, found that California's unitary system is unconstitutional because it violates the foreign commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Sacramento Bureau Chief
In a warning to Japan, Gov. George Deukmejian raised the possibility today of California's returning to the unitary method of taxing multinational firms if the Japanese do not significantly increase their investments in the state and open their markets more to imports. "There's nothing to stop us from doing that," he asserted.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The British government has warned the United States that it is not satisfied with the changes California has made to its "unitary tax" on multinational firms. Britain wants the tax eliminated, the Financial Times reported. The London-based newspaper said the warning came last week in a formal statement to the State Department by Sir Robin Renwick, British ambassador to the United States. Gov. Pete Wilson on Oct.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The Bush Administration on Tuesday asked the California Supreme Court to strike down a method used to tax foreign multinational corporations--an action officials warn could cost the state's dwindling treasury nearly $800 million in revenue. The court, hearing arguments in Los Angeles, was told by a lawyer for the U.S.
NEWS
January 20, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Siding with California in a tax case in which $4 billion is at stake, lawyers for the Clinton Administration on Wednesday urged the Supreme Court to uphold the state's use of the so-called "unitary tax" on multinational corporations. The legal brief, filed in the pending case of Barclays Bank vs. California, 92-1384, redeems Clinton's campaign pledge to take a "pro-California" stand in the huge tax dispute, which involves the nation's foreign trading partners.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said Wednesday that Gov. George Deukmejian is making Proposition 98, the school funding initiative, "a scapegoat" for threatened budget cutbacks. Honig, one of the sponsors of the November ballot initiative, said budget difficulties facing Deukmejian are due to tax breaks for foreign corporations and wealthy individuals enacted by the governor and Legislature in recent years.
BUSINESS
October 18, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The British government has warned the United States that it is not satisfied with the changes California has made to its "unitary tax" on multinational firms. Britain wants the tax eliminated, the Financial Times reported. The London-based newspaper said the warning came last week in a formal statement to the State Department by Sir Robin Renwick, British ambassador to the United States. Gov. Pete Wilson on Oct.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
About $125 for every man, woman and child in the state. Those are the stakes when the Supreme Court ultimately decides whether California ever had the right to tax multinational corporations based on their worldwide earnings. What's not at stake is whether California will continue to apply this "unitary" taxing method in the future, because the state has already abandoned it unless a company actually prefers the method. No one intends to bring it back, either.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The Bush Administration on Tuesday asked the California Supreme Court to strike down a method used to tax foreign multinational corporations--an action officials warn could cost the state's dwindling treasury nearly $800 million in revenue. The court, hearing arguments in Los Angeles, was told by a lawyer for the U.S.
NEWS
December 5, 1990 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An appellate court has dealt California another setback in the high-stakes battle to save its so-called "unitary tax" on foreign-based multinational corporations--a ruling that could cost the state hundreds of millions of dollars. The 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento, deciding in favor of London-based Barclays Bank and its California subsidiary, found that California's unitary system is unconstitutional because it violates the foreign commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1990 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British-owned Barclays Bank and other multinational corporations doing business in California cheered a state appeals court decision declaring the state's method of unitary taxation unconstitutional. California officials immediately vowed to appeal the ruling issued late Monday by a panel of the 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento.
NEWS
December 29, 1988 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig said Wednesday that Gov. George Deukmejian is making Proposition 98, the school funding initiative, "a scapegoat" for threatened budget cutbacks. Honig, one of the sponsors of the November ballot initiative, said budget difficulties facing Deukmejian are due to tax breaks for foreign corporations and wealthy individuals enacted by the governor and Legislature in recent years.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1990 | JANE APPLEGATE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British-owned Barclays Bank and other multinational corporations doing business in California cheered a state appeals court decision declaring the state's method of unitary taxation unconstitutional. California officials immediately vowed to appeal the ruling issued late Monday by a panel of the 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1993 | DANIEL AKST
About $125 for every man, woman and child in the state. Those are the stakes when the Supreme Court ultimately decides whether California ever had the right to tax multinational corporations based on their worldwide earnings. What's not at stake is whether California will continue to apply this "unitary" taxing method in the future, because the state has already abandoned it unless a company actually prefers the method. No one intends to bring it back, either.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1987 | NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writer
The state's newly established trade office in Japan has helped to steer $100 million worth of new investment into California from Asia, Gov. George Deukmejian said Thursday. The governor, who is hosting a two-day Pacific Rim Roundtable in Los Angeles, said the new direct investment will mean about 2,000 new jobs for California workers. Deukmejian made the disclosure in a question-and-answer session with reporters.
NEWS
January 23, 1987 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Sacramento Bureau Chief
In a warning to Japan, Gov. George Deukmejian raised the possibility today of California's returning to the unitary method of taxing multinational firms if the Japanese do not significantly increase their investments in the state and open their markets more to imports. "There's nothing to stop us from doing that," he asserted.
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