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February 13, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
Contract Talks at McDonnell: Bargaining officials of the aerospace giant and United Aerospace Workers Local 148, which represents about 9,000 of McDonnell's Douglas Aircraft Co. workers in Long Beach, are set to begin new contract negotiations today. The workers build the company's commercial jetliners and its C-17 military transport. The union's existing four-year contract expires April 16.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major about-face, McDonnell Douglas Corp. has agreed under certain conditions to build its proposed MD-95 jetliner in Long Beach instead of in Texas as part of a new contract that was ratified Sunday by McDonnell's hourly workers. It was the second dose of good news in two months for hard-pressed Long Beach, which has lost tens of thousands of jobs in recent years because of cutbacks in defense spending.
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NEWS
March 25, 1991
McDonnell Douglas Corp. engineers, electricians and component assemblers rejected a proposed four-year contract Sunday, but union officials say the 19,700 workers will be on the job today rather than on the picket line. Even in the wake of the strike authorization vote earlier this month, union leaders said they had no intention of going on strike. "All we want to do is go back to the bargaining table," United Aerospace Workers Local 148 President Richard Rios said in Long Beach.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1995 | Times Staff Reports
Contract Talks at McDonnell: Bargaining officials of the aerospace giant and United Aerospace Workers Local 148, which represents about 9,000 of McDonnell's Douglas Aircraft Co. workers in Long Beach, are set to begin new contract negotiations today. The workers build the company's commercial jetliners and its C-17 military transport. The union's existing four-year contract expires April 16.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1990
Why it began and where it will end are open to endless debate and speculation. The recent deal cooked up by the Reagan/Bush Administrations delivered countless thousands of U.S. aerospace workers' jobs to the Japanese when the FX fighter plane contract was inked. Now we read (Dec. 21) that McDonnell Douglas has arranged to ship even more defense jobs and technology overseas in a joint venture with the South Korean government through the F/A-18 subcontract. C'mon, guys, give us a break!
BUSINESS
April 24, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major about-face, McDonnell Douglas Corp. has agreed under certain conditions to build its proposed MD-95 jetliner in Long Beach instead of in Texas as part of a new contract that was ratified Sunday by McDonnell's hourly workers. It was the second dose of good news in two months for hard-pressed Long Beach, which has lost tens of thousands of jobs in recent years because of cutbacks in defense spending.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1997
Nearly 8,000 McDonnell Douglas Corp. workers in Long Beach on Friday will receive bonuses averaging $890 for creating ways to save time on airplane production tasks. The savings are split with McDonnell under a "gainsharing" plan adopted in its 1995 contract with United Aerospace Workers Local 148. Local President Kedrick Legg said worker skepticism about the program is changing "now that they've seen some results." Next year's bonuses should be much larger, the company said.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1993
It was with considerable dismay that we at United Aerospace Workers Local 887 read the footnote on Harry Bernstein's Labor column of March 30, indicating that it was to be his last. Although we wish him the very best as he starts his retirement, we can't help but feel that organized labor has lost one of the few remaining honest labor analysts in the print media. Although there were times when we weren't in complete agreement with everything he wrote, he has never been anything but fair, incisive and direct when it came to stating the case for and about unions and union workers.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1989 | from Associated Press
Boeing Co. scientists, engineers and technical workers are considering contract offers that are smaller than those that production workers won recently. Ballots to vote on the proposed contracts were mailed to 17,593 members of the Seattle Professional Engineering Employees Assn., with a vote count scheduled for Dec. 18. Meanwhile, Boeing Helicopters union workers on Sunday ratified a contract similar to the one accepted by the International Assn.
NEWS
November 6, 1986
econd major union representing workers at Long Beach-based Douglas Aircraft Co. has overwhelmingly rejected a contract offer by the company. About 98% of the nearly 4,000 machinists who voted Sunday rejected the new pact. The workers, members of the International Assn. of Machinists, are from Douglas' facility in Torrance and the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics plant in Huntington Beach. United Aerospace Workers in Douglas' Long Beach plant rejected a similar offer 10-1 in October.
NEWS
March 25, 1991
McDonnell Douglas Corp. engineers, electricians and component assemblers rejected a proposed four-year contract Sunday, but union officials say the 19,700 workers will be on the job today rather than on the picket line. Even in the wake of the strike authorization vote earlier this month, union leaders said they had no intention of going on strike. "All we want to do is go back to the bargaining table," United Aerospace Workers Local 148 President Richard Rios said in Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1990
Why it began and where it will end are open to endless debate and speculation. The recent deal cooked up by the Reagan/Bush Administrations delivered countless thousands of U.S. aerospace workers' jobs to the Japanese when the FX fighter plane contract was inked. Now we read (Dec. 21) that McDonnell Douglas has arranged to ship even more defense jobs and technology overseas in a joint venture with the South Korean government through the F/A-18 subcontract. C'mon, guys, give us a break!
BUSINESS
December 15, 1988 | From Reuters
Aluminum Co. of America said it will take a fourth-quarter pretax charge of about $50 million because of retroactive profit sharing and bonus provisions contained in new contracts reached with three of its unions. Alcoa said new 43-month labor agreements have been ratified by its major unions, covering about 15,000 employees at 14 plants. The unions are the United Steelworkers of America, the Aluminum, Brick & Glass Workers International Union and the United Automobile & Aerospace Workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1990
If I read it right, an article published Jan. 25 indicated bidders on contracts to construct the aptly labeled "bullet train" from Anaheim to Las Vegas had met the deadline for submission of those bids. It's interesting to note the contractors appear very eager to take U.S. workers' and taxpayers' money and pour it into overseas companies. Orange County Supervisor Don R. Roth is apparently planning a very nice "junket" to both France and Germany to study (and probably purchase)
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