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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1998 | JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Facing mounting debts and a foreclosure sale of its two properties, a Bellflower clinic that served the county's Native American community for nearly three decades seems certain to fold by the end of the year, staff and county officials said. The American Indian Clinic, the county's only free clinic that targeted Native Americans, owes creditors hundreds of thousands of dollars, and its finances are in disarray.
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FOOD
December 19, 1993
If you'd like to help, there are many agencies throughout Southern California that are desperate for food donations. Here is a list of a few. Note that because so many of these are staffed by volunteers, it is important to be sure to call and make an appointment before dropping things off. CENTRAL LOS ANGELES AIDS Project L.A.'s Necessities of Life Program: 6721 Romaine St., Hollywood, (213) 962-1600, ext. 180. All People's Christian Center: 822 East 20th St., Los Angeles, (213) 747-6357.
FOOD
December 10, 1992
John Knapp has been with the Southern California Food Bank for seven years and has never seen things so bad. "We've had increases in requests for food go up 25% or more in the last year," he says, "and most of that is senior citizens and single mothers with children. We are seeing a tremendous increase in need." Knapp estimates that 70% of the 4.5 million people his organization serves every year are children and another 15% senior citizens. "It's devastating what's going on," he says.
FOOD
December 7, 1995 | CINDY DORN
"I have absolutely no good news this year," says Doris Bloch, executive director of the Los Angeles Regional Food Bank. When she came to the food bank in 1983, Bloch says, she never dreamed that 12 years later it would be harder to get surplus food to feed the hungry. But it is.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Sundance first saw the "Lights of Death" as a boy in the Mad Bear country of the Dakotas, along the Missouri River. When he encountered them again in downtown Los Angeles this year, they followed him into the Rosslyn Hotel, where he lives in a small room that overlooks a corner of Skid Row. Between those sightings, Sundance has lived as a modern warrior of sorts.
FOOD
November 13, 1986 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Last year's listing of places accepting food donations for the needy received such positive response, both from readers and recipients, that it has been updated. Again we are encouraging anyone who can to share with others less fortunate, even with the smallest donation. In the words of one program director, "Anything we get is more than what we had before." Over and over, we heard that the need for food is even greater this year.
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