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United Anglers Of Casa Grande

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SPORTS
June 7, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
It was a blow to the students at Casa Grande High School last year when the administration announced that the small building adjacent to the playing field did not meet earthquake codes and therefore was off limits. The long-since abandoned greenhouse had been the lifeblood of the United Anglers of Casa Grande, a group of 34 students who, after raising $7,000, had converted the dilapidated building into a fish hatchery. With it, they all thought, they could make a world of change in this fast-growing community of about 40,000.
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SPORTS
June 7, 1989 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
It was a blow to the students at Casa Grande High School last year when the administration announced that the small building adjacent to the playing field did not meet earthquake codes and therefore was off limits. The long-since abandoned greenhouse had been the lifeblood of the United Anglers of Casa Grande, a group of 34 students who, after raising $7,000, had converted the dilapidated building into a fish hatchery. With it, they all thought, they could make a world of change in this fast-growing community of about 40,000.
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SPORTS
February 1, 1995 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The kids couldn't believe their eyes. Right there, in the creek that flows by their high school, were the most beautiful fish they had ever seen: chinook salmon, silvery red and plump as could be. There were dozens of them. It was probably the biggest run up the meandering 5 1/2-mile stream this century. The students jumped into the creek with nets and hauled out 29 of the wayward salmon, believed to be strays from the endangered Sacramento River fall run.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
Outdoorsman and writer Ed Zern, a conservationist with a sense of humor, is still spouting the one-liners that have endeared him so long to so many anglers. "I prefer any kind of fishing to any kind of work," the 78-year-old Zern likes to say. And: "Fishermen are born honest, but they get over it." "Some wise guy once defined a fishing line as a piece of string with a worm on one end and a damn fool on the other. This is a silly definition, of course, for many fishermen use flies instead of worms."
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