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United Artists Corp

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BUSINESS
May 30, 1986
Tamara Rawitt has been named vice president-production at United Artists Corp., Beverly Hills.
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BUSINESS
May 11, 2004 | From Associated Press
Danny Rosett has been named president of the United Artists specialty films unit of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc. Rosett, who reports to Vice Chairman Chris McGurk, fills the job formerly held by Bingham Ray, who left the company in January. Rosett most recently was executive vice president of marketing and distribution for MGM Studios. Separately, Century City-based MGM said it was putting its international theatrical distribution unit under home entertainment chief David Bishop.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1997 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Long before the surprise box-office bonanza of Paramount Pictures' "The First Wives Club," Bette Midler and Diane Keaton had individually indicated interest in a project that had slipped through the cracks at United Artists. Now, eager to follow up on the chemistry and commerce generated by "Wives," which has grossed $105 million, they recently decided to team up on the UA venture--with Goldie Hawn also on board.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1986
"It is our firm conviction that each of the creative divisions will be free to devote their attention to a single task: that of making United Artists Corp. the most important supplier of quality motion picture and television product in the world," said UA Chairman Lee Rich. He said the MGM film unit will be headed by Alan Ladd Jr., the UA movie division by Anthony Thomopoulos and the MGM/UA Television Group by David Gerber. MGM and UA are primarily owned by Las Vegas financier Kirk Kerkorian.
NEWS
August 21, 1986
The City Council on Tuesday gave final approval to a zoning change that will allow United Artists Corp. to build an 88,000-square-foot office building and small park on Wilshire Boulevard at Crescent Drive. The zoning change, approved earlier by the Planning Commission, converted the vacant lot from R-4 residential to C-3 commercial zoning. In exchange, United Artists agreed to put in the small park, which will serve as a buffer between the project and a residential neighborhood.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1985 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Financier Kirk Kerkorian on Monday named one of the most flamboyant and successful of contemporary Hollywood entrepreneurs to head his United Artists Corp. He is 48-year-old Jerry Weintraub. Although Weintraub's job as the new UA chairman and chief executive began immediately, he will not have a studio all his own until the completion of the $1.5-billion sale of UA's parent, MGM/UA Entertainment, to Turner Broadcasting System.
NEWS
April 1, 1989 | WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr. and KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writers
After nearly a year of rumors, on-again, off-again negotiations with a variety of suitors and several 11th-hour reversals, MGM/UA Communications Co. has agreed to be sold for $1 billion to an Australian company best known here for co-producing the hit TV miniseries "Lonesome Dove." As part of the deal, major MGM assets will be immediately repurchased by its longtime owner, Kirk Kerkorian, for $250 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
A shiver of horror has crept through Hollywood this summer as word spread that the Australians who will soon own United Artists Corp. did something weird. They pulled the plug on a sure thing--a movie that virtually had to make money--because it was, well, beneath them. The film in question is "Child's Play II," a planned sequel to last fall's surprise hit about a homicidal doll.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
United Artists Communications and United Cable Television on Wednesday announced an agreement to combine in a new company that would rank as the nation's third-largest cable-TV operator. The merger also strengthened the grip of Tele-Communications, the nation's largest cable operator, which will own 52% of the new entity. The terms of the deal appeared to satisfy some outspoken investors who attacked an earlier merger proposal that would have paid no cash.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1996 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As expected, Lindsay Doran, 48, was named president of United Artists on Wednesday, filling the post vacated by John Calley. Frank Mancuso, chairman of UA parent MGM Inc., closed the deal with Doran late Tuesday after pursuing the executive a few weeks ago when it was announced that she and her longtime partner, director Sydney Pollack, were splitting up.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1995 | Kenneth Turan, Kenneth Turan is The Times' film critic.
It wasn't only actors who, to echo Norma Desmond, had faces in Hollywood's past. Studios had them too. While nothing more than the corporate logo now distinguishes a film made by Paramount from one turned out by Universal, it was not always that way. MGM, for instance, could be counted on for polished star vehicles, and Warner Bros. for crime melodramas and social relevance.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their first interviews together since they took over the troubled company this summer, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's new managers said Thursday that they are well on their way up to major-studio status. Chairman Frank Mancuso pledged that production under the MGM and United Artists banners will be boosted from previous low levels to 20 pictures annually starting next year, with as many as eight more movies coming from Carolco Pictures and Polygram Filmed Entertainment.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1993 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Calley, a senior Warner Bros. executive in the 1970s who later linked up with director Mike Nichols to produce films, was named Monday to head United Artists Pictures. Calley, 62, begins work Sept. 13. United Artists is being revived as part of an effort to make its parent company, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, more attractive to prospective buyers.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1993 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Paramount Pictures Chairman Frank G. Mancuso is in negotiations to run a revamped United Artists movie studio, according to knowledgeable sources. Mancuso would be named UA's chairman and would co-manage a combined United Artists/Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer marketing and distribution division under the terms of the deal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Sid Grauman opened his Egyptian Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard in 1922, an orchestra played, a Wurlitzer thundered and singers and dancers filled the stage. A robed sentry paced the roof and Douglas Fairbanks was on the screen in the premiere of "Robin Hood." A ticket cost $1.50--big money in those days. When United Artists closed the theater earlier this month, the stage was gone, along with the looming columns that made the courtyard look like a pharaoh's temple.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
In the 1950s, the moguls who had ruled Hollywood since its inception finally lost their grip on the studios. With their passing ended an era not only in Hollywood movie-making, but political activism. Last week's excerpt from Times national political correspondent Ronald Brownstein's upcoming book, "The Power and the Glitter: The Hollywood-Washington Connection" (Pantheon), examined how Lew R. Wasserman at MCA Inc. and Arthur B. Krim at United Artists Corp.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1989 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Christopher Skase, the 40-year-old Aussie who is buying MGM/UA Communications for $1 billion, said Friday that his path for resurrecting 70-year-old United Artists as a movie maker calls for "evolution, not revolution." UA, founded by Charlie Chaplin, Mary Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks and D. W. Griffith, has been dormant as a producer since MGM/UA folded its two production units into a single operation last fall. During the latter half of 1988, the studio was marked by wholesale departures of film-making talent assembled by Lee Rich, formerly MGM/UA's chief executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
In the 1950s, the moguls who had ruled Hollywood since its inception finally lost their grip on the studios. With their passing ended an era not only in Hollywood movie-making, but political activism. Last week's excerpt from Times national political correspondent Ronald Brownstein's upcoming book, "The Power and the Glitter: The Hollywood-Washington Connection" (Pantheon), examined how Lew R. Wasserman at MCA Inc. and Arthur B. Krim at United Artists Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1989 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
A shiver of horror has crept through Hollywood this summer as word spread that the Australians who will soon own United Artists Corp. did something weird. They pulled the plug on a sure thing--a movie that virtually had to make money--because it was, well, beneath them. The film in question is "Child's Play II," a planned sequel to last fall's surprise hit about a homicidal doll.
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