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BUSINESS
May 24, 1989
Nissan Told to Release Injury Logs: The Tennessee Department of Labor has ordered Nissan Motor Manufacturing USA to release worker injury records that have become the focus of a United Auto Workers organizing drive at the company's plant. The UAW passed out flyers detailing the workers' attempts to examine the records before a vote over whether the UAW will represent 2,400 production and maintenance workers at Nissan's only U.S. plant. Two workers said they were told they could not see the "Log 200" records even though they showed a supervisor the Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations that said they had that right.
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BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Evan Soltas, a Princeton student writing fluently from a platform at Bloomberg View, should be praised for touching off a vigorous debate among print journalists, bloggers and other commentators (including me) over the role of unions in the U.S. economy. As for the points he's raised and on which he's now doubling down in reaction to criticism he's received, they're still wrong. It's proper to remember that what really set off this discussion was the United Auto Workers' recent defeat in an organizing vote at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tenn.
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BUSINESS
August 31, 1998 | Bloomberg News
United Auto Workers union members ratified by a 233-38 margin a Lear Corp. contract that provides a 43% raise over three years. However, the workers, who assemble seats in jobs that were once handled by General Motors workers, will still end up earning significantly less than the approximately $21 an hour that workers earn in most GM plants. Seat assemblers at the Lordstown, Ohio, plant now make $10.50 an hour.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
Union leaders were still reeling three days after their devastating defeat at a Tennessee Volkswagen plant, but the leader of the AFL-CIO said labor would keep trying to organize workers in the South - even if it's an uphill battle. "We are committed to helping those workers in the South raise their wages, get better working conditions and get a stronger voice on the job in making decisions that affect their livelihood," Richard Trumka told reporters Monday. Trumka was in Houston to talk about the year ahead with the executive council of his coalition, which represents 56 unions and 12.5 million workers.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
United Auto Workers members have approved a 31-month contract with Mitsubishi Motors North America, union officials said. Local 2488 President Ralph Timan, calling the pact "a major victory for our members," said 77% voted in favor of the deal Sunday. The factory here, the Japanese automaker's only U.S. plant, makes the Eclipse, Galant and Endeavor models.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leonard Woodcock, the president of the United Auto Workers during much of the 1970s who pioneered important gains at the bargaining table and later was President Jimmy Carter's envoy to China, has died, the union announced. Woodcock died Tuesday night at his home in Ann Arbor from pulmonary complications. He was 89.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1999 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a years-long battle over pay, teaching load and benefits, UC Irvine students learned Thursday that they had won the right to negotiate their work conditions through a union. Joining a wave of their peers throughout the University of California system, the Irvine students voted 353 to 225 to become part of the United Auto Workers, according to ballots counted Thursday.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1990 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
General Motors will give workers a 3% raise, sweeten the pot for retirees and quit paying bonuses to employees just for showing up, according to industry officials familiar with a tentative agreement GM reached early Monday with the United Auto Workers. But details of the costliest and most important part of the accord, a program to protect jobs in the face of GM's need to slash its work force to better compete against foreign-owned auto firms, were sketchy.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressure mounted Monday on General Motors Corp. and the United Auto Workers to settle the two strikes that are crippling GM's North American car and truck production. Negotiations are intensifying as GM's annual two-week summer vacation ends next Monday. Unless an agreement is reached before then, GM may find it difficult to resume production promptly and limit the dispute's financial damage.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2006
More than 33,000 factory workers at General Motors Corp. and former subsidiary Delphi Corp. have accepted buyout offers, exceeding early expectations, the United Auto Workers union said.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Turning more than 1,500 painters, inspectors, tradespeople and maintenance workers at a Tennessee auto plant into union members was supposed to be relatively easy for the United Auto Workers union, experts on organized labor said. The effort would have created the first union at a foreign-owned automaker in the historically anti-union South - and raised the morale of a union that has seen membership plummet from 1.5 million in 1979 to 380,000 last year. But 53% of workers at the 3-year-old Volkswagen factory in Chattanooga rejected a unionization bid, giving pro-union autoworkers from Michigan to Mississippi a reason to squirm and providing what experts said was the latest sign that conservative efforts and the threat of job losses were crippling U.S. labor unions.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Thursday is the second of three days of a union-organizing vote at Volkswagen's Tennessee auto assembly plant, and it's being tracked like a congressional special election. Is it a bellwether for the state of modern labor? Or is it a one-off that says nothing of significance beyond the confines of the VW factory floor? It's a bit of both. The vote has attracted an extraordinary amount of outside interest and pressure , including misleading public billboards, bizarre claims on local talk-radio stations and a general frothing from the anti-union right that worker-management cooperation is the first step toward Stalinism.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2011 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Deric Golden has what he calls his dream job, fixing small flaws on the sedans being churned out at the Hyundai factory here. So when two organizers from the United Auto Workers knocked on his apartment door one day, hoping to get him to sign a union card, he quickly sent them packing. "I told them I didn't work at the plant," said Golden, 29. "I just wasn't interested. " It's the same story in town after town along the southern tier of Auto Alley, a corridor that runs north-south along interstates 75 and 65 from Lexington, Ky., to Montgomery.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher
National labor union officials, community leaders and politicians stepped up their efforts to pressure embattled Toyota Motor Corp. to reverse its decision to stop making cars in Northern California. Seeking to piggyback on bad publicity generated by Toyota's massive safety recalls, the United Auto Workers union held a rally Friday outside the quarter-century-old New United Motor Manufacturing Inc. factory in Fremont, 40 miles southeast of San Francisco. The rally protested the planned March 31 closure of the plant, which would put 4,700 union members out of work.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera
General Motors Corp. cleared a major obstacle Thursday when it reached a tentative agreement with the United Auto Workers union to modify its labor contract, but Obama administration officials continued to signal that bankruptcy might be the best option. "GM faces a number of hurdles, and it may well be a court process is necessary to effectuate the restructuring," said a senior administration official who was not authorized to speak publicly.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2009 | Tom Petruno and Ken Bensinger
With Wall Street increasingly confident about Ford Motor Co.'s survival, the company now wants to test investors' appetite for more stock. After the market closed Monday, Ford announced plans to sell 300 million new shares. At Monday's closing price of $6.08 a share, the deal would raise $1.8 billion in cash. The company said proceeds from the offering would be used to fund a portion of the payments it owes to the United Auto Workers' retiree healthcare trust.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1998
General Motors and the United Auto Workers continued their stalemate, with no progress reported during the talks at either the Flint Metal Center or the Delphi East complex as the strike entered its third week.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2009 | Peter Wallsten
With the White House positioned to reshape the future of the auto industry, Republican Sen. Bob Corker was so concerned about the prospects for his home state of Tennessee that he delivered a personal warning to the administration's point man on the issue. Don't keep plants open in Ohio and Michigan, which voted for President Obama last year, at the expense of a plant in Tennessee, which is solidly Republican, he said. "I wanted to know: Would they employ a blue-state, red-state strategy?"
BUSINESS
February 3, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A United Auto Workers official said General Motors Corp. was moving to reduce its factory workforce by offering early retirement and buyout packages to all U.S. hourly workers represented by the union. The official said the offers of $20,000 in cash and a $25,000 voucher to buy a vehicle were made by e-mail to local union officials. The official asked not to be identified because not all workers had been notified. Meanwhile, a union official said Chrysler already was offering buyout and early retirement packages to hourly workers in an effort to replace them with new hires who would earn less money.
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