Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Automobile Workers
IN THE NEWS

United Automobile Workers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
RIDGELAND, Miss. - Over the bass beat coming from the band, the Rev. Charles Miller is leading his congregation in boisterous prayer. As his voice rings out, blessing the community and the oppressed, the congregation affirming each line, he names a new group that he says deserves God's attention. "We pray for the employees who are working at Nissan," Miller says, and the dozens of women and men in the pews say amen to that, too. "We pray you wake up the conscience of those that are oppressing them," he says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
RIDGELAND, Miss. - Over the bass beat coming from the band, the Rev. Charles Miller is leading his congregation in boisterous prayer. As his voice rings out, blessing the community and the oppressed, the congregation affirming each line, he names a new group that he says deserves God's attention. "We pray for the employees who are working at Nissan," Miller says, and the dozens of women and men in the pews say amen to that, too. "We pray you wake up the conscience of those that are oppressing them," he says.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 13, 1987 | From Reuters
General Motors' new agreement with the United Automobile Workers leaves the company free to carry out its announced plant closings but bars it from phasing out more factories for three years, according to a union summary of the agreement. The UAW last week reached agreement on a new contract covering about 370,000 active and laid-off GM workers in a settlement that avoided a strike.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
Pastors and students in Mississippi are putting pressure on Nissan to remain neutral as the United Automobile Workers try to organize a 5,600-worker plant near Jackson. They're planning marches and protest events with the slogan “Workers' Rights are Civil Rights.” Many say the campaign for better working conditions at the Nissan plant, described in a story in the Los Angeles Times , is a new kind of civil rights struggle. Unions are increasingly turning to outside community groups to help organize workers, labor experts say, especially after the UAW lost a recent key vote at a Volkswagen plant in Tennessee.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Worries about job losses and uncertainty about the benefits of union membership contributed to Volkswagen workers in Tennessee rejecting the United Automobile Workers' bid to unionize a 1,500-worker facility, union advocates and other officials said in the wake of Friday night's results. “The UAW tried to promise significant wages, and I think that was shown as a simple, unfillable campaign promise,” Maury Nicely, an attorney involved with the anti-union effort, told the Los Angeles Times on Saturday.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
Pastors and students in Mississippi are putting pressure on Nissan to remain neutral as the United Automobile Workers try to organize a 5,600-worker plant near Jackson. They're planning marches and protest events with the slogan “Workers' Rights are Civil Rights.” Many say the campaign for better working conditions at the Nissan plant, described in a story in the Los Angeles Times , is a new kind of civil rights struggle. Unions are increasingly turning to outside community groups to help organize workers, labor experts say, especially after the UAW lost a recent key vote at a Volkswagen plant in Tennessee.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
General Motors prepared to close two more assembly plants Friday because of an 8-day-old strike at a GM parts plant here as marathon negotiations to end the walkout continued. The auto maker said it would close plants in Wilmington, Del., and Lansing, Mich., Friday because of a lack of parts. The plants join seven others that have already been shuttered. The supply shortage had already closed assembly plants in Oklahoma City; Wentzville, Mo.; Flint, Mich.; Baltimore; Orion Township, Mich.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
A strike at a crucial General Motors Corp. parts plant threatened to spill over to a nearby car factory Friday and cause shortages at other GM facilities. General Motors was forced to halt production Friday at a Chevrolet Cavalier and Pontiac Sunbird facility due to a strike at its Lordstown, Ohio, parts plant. It was the second day GM was forced to halt production at one of its car plants in response to growing shortages of metal body panels and other parts.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | TED THACKREY Jr., Times Staff Writer
Auto magnate Henry Ford II, who for 35 years ran the automobile company founded by his grandfather, managing it from the brink of disaster to the top rank of industrial power, died Tuesday in a Detroit hospital. Ford, 70, who had a history of heart problems, was admitted to Cottage Hospital in suburban Grosse Pointe Farms on Sept. 9 for treatment of pneumonia he contracted while living at his country estate outside London. He was transferred Sept.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1985
Nat Weinberg, an economist credited with forcing many breakthroughs in labor-management relations for the United Automobile Workers, has died in Washington of an apparent heart attack. Weinberg was 71. He became a close associate of union leader Walter Reuther after joining the UAW in 1947. In addition to being Reuther's statistician, Weinberg was credited with personally bargaining the 1955 contract that greatly improved auto workers' supplemental unemployment benefits. He retired in 1974.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Worries about job losses and uncertainty about the benefits of union membership contributed to Volkswagen workers in Tennessee rejecting the United Automobile Workers' bid to unionize a 1,500-worker facility, union advocates and other officials said in the wake of Friday night's results. “The UAW tried to promise significant wages, and I think that was shown as a simple, unfillable campaign promise,” Maury Nicely, an attorney involved with the anti-union effort, told the Los Angeles Times on Saturday.
BUSINESS
September 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
General Motors prepared to close two more assembly plants Friday because of an 8-day-old strike at a GM parts plant here as marathon negotiations to end the walkout continued. The auto maker said it would close plants in Wilmington, Del., and Lansing, Mich., Friday because of a lack of parts. The plants join seven others that have already been shuttered. The supply shortage had already closed assembly plants in Oklahoma City; Wentzville, Mo.; Flint, Mich.; Baltimore; Orion Township, Mich.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
A strike at a crucial General Motors Corp. parts plant threatened to spill over to a nearby car factory Friday and cause shortages at other GM facilities. General Motors was forced to halt production Friday at a Chevrolet Cavalier and Pontiac Sunbird facility due to a strike at its Lordstown, Ohio, parts plant. It was the second day GM was forced to halt production at one of its car plants in response to growing shortages of metal body panels and other parts.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1987 | From Reuters
General Motors' new agreement with the United Automobile Workers leaves the company free to carry out its announced plant closings but bars it from phasing out more factories for three years, according to a union summary of the agreement. The UAW last week reached agreement on a new contract covering about 370,000 active and laid-off GM workers in a settlement that avoided a strike.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1991
So President Bush is inviting executives from the three big automobile manufacturing companies to accompany him on his trip to Japan at the end of this year ("Bush Asks Big 3 Auto Makers to Visit Japan," Dec. 7). The San Gabriel Valley branch, National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, calls on the President and Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher to consider inviting labor leaders of the automobile and steel industry as well as a prominent leader of the African-American community.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1985 | GREG JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Design workers at Chrysler Corp.'s Pacifica automotive design center on Thursday voted 13 to 3 in favor of joining the United Automobile Workers. Unless Chrysler contests the vote tally, the results will be forwarded to the National Labor Relations Board for certification, according to a UAW Region 6 spokesman in Los Angeles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|