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United Californians For Tax Reform

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August 8, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many Americans, Roland Boucher has long been irked by complex tax codes. So the Orange County retiree is trying to unleash California's next great tax revolt--on behalf of a "flat tax." Boucher and two associates--who were drawn together by Ross Perot's unsuccessful presidential campaign--say they have recruited 1,500 volunteers to help qualify a proposition for the 1996 statewide ballot.
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NEWS
August 8, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many Americans, Roland Boucher has long been irked and befuddled by the weblike complexity of the California income tax code. But while the rest of us merely groan and mail off our returns every April 15, this Orange County retiree wants to change the system. Along with two other, like-minded reformers, Boucher is trying to inspire what could become California's next great tax revolt.
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NEWS
August 8, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many Americans, Roland Boucher has long been irked and befuddled by the weblike complexity of the California income tax code. But while the rest of us merely groan and mail off our returns every April 15, this Orange County retiree wants to change the system. Along with two other, like-minded reformers, Boucher is trying to inspire what could become California's next great tax revolt.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many Americans, Roland Boucher has long been irked by complex tax codes. So the Orange County retiree is trying to unleash California's next great tax revolt--on behalf of a "flat tax." Boucher and two associates--who were drawn together by Ross Perot's unsuccessful presidential campaign--say they have recruited 1,500 volunteers to help qualify a proposition for the 1996 statewide ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1998
Stephen Moore is right (Column Right, Feb. 22). The best and fairest middle-class tax cut is raising the top of the 15% tax bracket. In 1994, United Californians for Tax Reform circulated an initiative to simplify the California tax code using the federal code as baseline. By eliminating many loopholes and deductions, we were able to raise the top of the lower tax rate for single filers to the salary of an assemblyman. The facts are that for every $20 billion of tax relief we can raise the top of the 15% bracket at least 10%. If Congress had followed this practice each year for the past 10 years, the top of the 15% bracket would now be over $65,000 for singles and $100,000 for a married couple!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1995
Re "Medicare Reform? GOP Didn't Go Far Enough," Opinion, Dec. 10: Linda Killian did not go far enough in describing the changes needed in Medicare funding. Medicare Part B subsidizes doctor visits and prescription drugs. Seventy percent of the cost is paid from the general fund. No Medicare tax money goes to support this. These expenditure add directly to the deficit. A major cost factor is that Medicare Part B is not means-tested--the same benefit is afforded all regardless of their financial status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1999
Re "Senate Candidate Urges Phaseout of Income Tax," Dec. 9: The flat tax is fair. The fair (sales) tax is not! I have a great respect for Rep. Tom Campbell, but he is wrong to support the national sales tax. The national sales tax is a boon to the well-off. This is one of the reasons we oppose it. May we suggest that a 10% flat tax would be much fairer and would do a better job of simplifying taxes. We show in our Web site how such a tax can be achieved by an evolutionary change to the tax code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 1995 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nation's growing disenchantment with its dominant political parties is no mystery to Roland Boucher, a Yale-educated electronics engineer who soldiered in Ross Perot's army of discontent during the 1992 presidential election year. And Boucher is still unhappy.
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