Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Chumash Council
IN THE NEWS

United Chumash Council

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
They are the most traditional-looking Indians in Santa Barbara County. Many wear their hair in braids and dress in full Indian regalia at public hearings. Some have assumed names such as White Bear and Mushu. They have more political power, county officials say, and have made more money monitoring construction sites for Chumash artifacts than any other Indian group in the area.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | MILES CORWIN, Times Staff Writer
They are the most traditional-looking Indians in Santa Barbara County. Many wear their hair in braids and dress in full Indian regalia at public hearings. Some have assumed names such as White Bear and Mushu. They have more political power, county officials say, and have made more money monitoring construction sites for Chumash artifacts than any other Indian group in the area.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1985 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
Archeologists say they have discovered what is believed to be the remains of a Chumash Indian village on an Agoura Hills slope earmarked for a 178-unit apartment project. After a week of unearthing artifacts--from beads to animal bone chips to arrow points--archeologists have determined the village dates to between AD 1200 and AD 1600 and was home to about 25 Chumash Indians living in three or four dwellings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1986 | THOMAS OMESTAD, Times Staff Writer
A mapping error has led to the accidental clearing of a centuries-old Chumash Indian prayer ground at a Camarillo housing tract, destroying artifacts and angering Indian activists. The area has been cordoned off and work halted until archeologists can assess its historical significance and salvage remaining artifacts.
NEWS
March 6, 1986 | THOMAS OMESTAD, Times Staff Writer
A mapping error has led to the accidental clearing of a centuries-old Chumash Indian prayer ground at a Camarillo housing tract, destroying artifacts and angering Indian activists. The area has been cordoned off and work halted until archeologists can assess its historical significance and salvage remaining artifacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1990 | GARY GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Connie Diaz remembers the day her daughter came home from school, angry after a lesson about the Chumash Indians. "They were teaching her things like, 'When the Chumash were here, they liked to fish and eat venison,' " said Diaz, a Ventura County resident who is part Chumash. "My daughter said, 'Mom, I just had to let them know that we're still here. They always talk about us as if we don't exist anymore.'
Los Angeles Times Articles
|