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United Citizens Against Drugs

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NEWS
November 20, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convinced that an anti-drug charity was a massive fraud, the state of Pennsylvania went to court to shut down Irvine-based United Citizens Against Drugs Inc. operations in that state last summer. In its lawsuit, Pennsylvania alleged that the United organization was part of a "pass-along" network of charities in which donated goods were passed from one charity to another at "grossly" inflated value, said Daniel Clearfield, Pennsylvania's executive deputy attorney general.
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NEWS
November 21, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Orange County charities continued to solicit money Friday, despite being sued by state authorities the day before for allegedly funneling more than 95% of their contributions into organizers' hands. "It was business as usual," said Mitchell D. Gold, owner of Orange County Charitable Services, the principle fund-raiser for the charities and the main defendant in the state attorney general's civil suit.
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NEWS
November 20, 1992 | MARC LACEY and BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In one of California's largest charity fraud cases, the state on Thursday sued three Orange County groups that claimed to fight drug abuse, help homeless veterans and assist abused children but were allegedly funneling more than 95% of their $8.6 million in contributions into organizers' hands.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convinced that an anti-drug charity was a massive fraud, the state of Pennsylvania went to court to shut down Irvine-based United Citizens Against Drugs Inc. operations in that state last summer. In its lawsuit, Pennsylvania alleged that the United organization was part of a "pass-along" network of charities in which donated goods were passed from one charity to another at "grossly" inflated value, said Daniel Clearfield, Pennsylvania's executive deputy attorney general.
NEWS
November 21, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Orange County charities continued to solicit money Friday, despite being sued by state authorities the day before for allegedly funneling more than 95% of their contributions into organizers' hands. "It was business as usual," said Mitchell D. Gold, owner of Orange County Charitable Services, the principle fund-raiser for the charities and the main defendant in the state attorney general's civil suit.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitchell Gold has been accused of big-league fraud. He has been accused of siphoning off millions of dollars donated to charity for personal gain. But Gold sees himself quite differently. "We are legal. We are licensed. We are bonded. . . . And no charity has complained," Gold said. In an interview Thursday, Gold said he is an honest businessman who is being "harassed" by the state attorney general's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1995 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County fund-raising group has been barred from soliciting more money until it provides a full accounting of the money it has raised, Atty. Gen. Dan Lungren announced Friday. The ruling names Orange County Charitable Services of Irvine; its owner, Mitchell D. Gold; his father, Herb Gold; his sister, Cindy Seide, and a business associate, J.P. Cohen. It also names American Veterans Assistance Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three Orange County charities continued to solicit money Friday, despite being sued by state authorities the day before for allegedly funneling more than 95% of their contributions into organizers' hands. "It was business as usual," said Mitchell D. Gold, owner of Orange County Charitable Services, the principle fund-raiser for the charities and the main defendant in the state attorney general's civil suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1999 | DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appellate court has upheld a lower court ruling that barred a controversial San Juan Capistrano telemarketing fund-raiser from doing business in California, adding that the businessman and his associates "have no shame." Mitchell Gold, 41, and his Orange County-based fund-raising outfits have raised millions of dollars nationwide for purported charities which receive only a small portion of the proceeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials at Orange County nonprofit agencies are bracing for what many describe as the potentially devastating effects of recent disclosures that several of their colleagues may have engaged in charity fraud and financial mismanagement. The timing of the disclosures could be especially damaging, officials fear, because it came the week that many charities kick off their major fund-raising drives for the upcoming year.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitchell Gold has been accused of big-league fraud. He has been accused of siphoning off millions of dollars donated to charity for personal gain. But Gold sees himself quite differently. "We are legal. We are licensed. We are bonded. . . . And no charity has complained," Gold said. In an interview Thursday, Gold said he is an honest businessman who is being "harassed" by the state attorney general's office.
NEWS
November 20, 1992 | MARC LACEY and BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In one of California's largest charity fraud cases, the state on Thursday sued three Orange County groups that claimed to fight drug abuse, help homeless veterans and assist abused children but were allegedly funneling more than 95% of their $8.6 million in contributions into organizers' hands.
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