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United Democratic Front South Africa

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NEWS
May 9, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A government ban on foreign contributions to the United Democratic Front, South Africa's largest anti-apartheid group, was lifted Friday by a provincial Supreme Court judge. The organization said it will immediately resume fund-raising abroad to finance new campaigns.
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NEWS
March 5, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A historic era in the black liberation movement came to a close Monday when the United Democratic Front, the combative 2-million-member anti-apartheid coalition that the government had spent most of the 1980s trying to silence, announced plans to disband. UDF leaders said that the multiracial umbrella organization for some 700 groups, from civic associations to church groups, had fulfilled the goals it set for itself when it was formed in 1983.
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NEWS
February 4, 1988
Factional strife between rival black organizations spilled into the white South African city of Pietermaritzburg, and 46 blacks were arrested after street fights broke out. Police and eyewitnesses said three blacks were seriously injured after a busload of followers of the Zulu Inkatha organization, armed with machetes and sticks, drove into the Natal provincial capital and attacked the offices of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, the country's main black labor federation.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rival Zulu factions battled with guns, clubs and knives Wednesday in Natal province, setting scores of homes on fire and forcing hundreds of villagers to flee into the countryside. Soldiers and police patrolled Natal in an effort to quell the violence, which broke out Tuesday and has killed at least two people. Local reporters said that up to 14 people have been killed. "The whole so-called 'Valley of Death' is covered with blue smoke.
NEWS
February 3, 1988
Black schools were closed and workers stayed away from their jobs out of fear for their safety in the violence-torn Pietermaritzburg area of South Africa, the Congress of South African Trade Unions reported. The area has been the site of bloody feuding between the United Democratic Front, a nationwide anti-apartheid coalition, and Inkatha, a more conservative group headed by Zulu leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
After the longest and one of the most important political trials in South African history, four leading black activists were convicted of treason Friday by a judge who ruled that the nation's largest anti-apartheid group, the United Democratic Front, plotted to violently overthrow the white minority-led government.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rival Zulu factions battled with guns, clubs and knives Wednesday in Natal province, setting scores of homes on fire and forcing hundreds of villagers to flee into the countryside. Soldiers and police patrolled Natal in an effort to quell the violence, which broke out Tuesday and has killed at least two people. Local reporters said that up to 14 people have been killed. "The whole so-called 'Valley of Death' is covered with blue smoke.
NEWS
May 26, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A top official of the United Democratic Front, a coalition of 700 anti-apartheid groups, was sentenced Monday to 11 years in prison as a terrorist for allegedly assisting the outlawed African National Congress. The Rev. Arnold Stofile, a Presbyterian minister, professor of theology and general secretary of the front in the East London region, was the first top-level leader of the group to be convicted under the security laws.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Factional fighting flared in the coastal province of Natal on Friday, leaving 13 women and children dead in an arson attack on houses in a black squatter settlement, police said. The incident occurred in the settlement of Cottonlands near the Indian township of Verulam, 15 miles north of Durban, an official police report said. Nearby Indian residents said they fear becoming involved in the fighting.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Three of South Africa's most important political detainees escaped Tuesday from a Johannesburg hospital and found refuge a mile away in the U.S. Consulate, setting up one of the stickiest diplomatic dilemmas here for the United States in many months. The State Department said it had been in frequent contact with the men before they were detained without charge more than a year ago and that "we . . . hold them in high regard." No U.S.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
African National Congress leader Nelson R. Mandela met Tuesday with chiefs from his tribe and with a Swedish diplomat, and plans were made for him to travel to Zimbabwe and Zambia next week. The National Reception Committee, which has coordinated Mandela's schedule since he was released Feb. 11 after 27 years in prison, said he will go to Harare, Zimbabwe, on Monday. On Tuesday, he will go to Lusaka, Zambia, where he will meet with exiled ANC leaders.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Factional fighting flared in the coastal province of Natal on Friday, leaving 13 women and children dead in an arson attack on houses in a black squatter settlement, police said. The incident occurred in the settlement of Cottonlands near the Indian township of Verulam, 15 miles north of Durban, an official police report said. Nearby Indian residents said they fear becoming involved in the fighting.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five leading anti-apartheid activists, convicted last year in a historic treason trial that dealt a sharp blow to black protest in South Africa, were freed from prison Friday after the country's highest court overturned their convictions. "We're overjoyed to be back with our families," Popo Molefe, 37, general secretary of the United Democratic Front, said in an interview on the plane taking him home to Johannesburg.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
In an unprecedented move, South Africa's largest anti-apartheid coalition renounced black activist Winnie Mandela on Thursday, saying she had abused the trust of the country's black majority and "violated the spirit and ethos" of their struggle against white-minority rule. The action by the 2-million-member United Democratic Front marked the first public denunciation of Winnie Mandela by the national movement that for three decades has looked to her husband, imprisoned nationalist Nelson R.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
After the longest and one of the most important political trials in South African history, four leading black activists were convicted of treason Friday by a judge who ruled that the nation's largest anti-apartheid group, the United Democratic Front, plotted to violently overthrow the white minority-led government.
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Three of South Africa's most important political detainees escaped Tuesday from a Johannesburg hospital and found refuge a mile away in the U.S. Consulate, setting up one of the stickiest diplomatic dilemmas here for the United States in many months. The State Department said it had been in frequent contact with the men before they were detained without charge more than a year ago and that "we . . . hold them in high regard." No U.S.
NEWS
February 16, 1988 | From Reuters
Vicious weekend fighting among blacks in South Africa's Natal province claimed 12 victims, and prospects for an end to the feuding appeared to dim. A 61-year-old woman's throat was slit, a 15-year-old boy was gunned down and an elderly couple were stabbed to death in the latest violence, police said Monday. Prospects for a reconciliation between the combatants--the radical United Democratic Front and the conservative Zulu Inkatha movement--appeared as elusive as ever.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five leading anti-apartheid activists, convicted last year in a historic treason trial that dealt a sharp blow to black protest in South Africa, were freed from prison Friday after the country's highest court overturned their convictions. "We're overjoyed to be back with our families," Popo Molefe, 37, general secretary of the United Democratic Front, said in an interview on the plane taking him home to Johannesburg.
NEWS
February 16, 1988 | From Reuters
Vicious weekend fighting among blacks in South Africa's Natal province claimed 12 victims, and prospects for an end to the feuding appeared to dim. A 61-year-old woman's throat was slit, a 15-year-old boy was gunned down and an elderly couple were stabbed to death in the latest violence, police said Monday. Prospects for a reconciliation between the combatants--the radical United Democratic Front and the conservative Zulu Inkatha movement--appeared as elusive as ever.
NEWS
February 4, 1988
Factional strife between rival black organizations spilled into the white South African city of Pietermaritzburg, and 46 blacks were arrested after street fights broke out. Police and eyewitnesses said three blacks were seriously injured after a busload of followers of the Zulu Inkatha organization, armed with machetes and sticks, drove into the Natal provincial capital and attacked the offices of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, the country's main black labor federation.
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