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United Express Money Order Co

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BUSINESS
October 28, 1989
A court-appointed receiver will begin trying to restore money to hundreds of customers of United Express Money Order Co. of Long Beach, a firm that the state shut down this week after finding that it lacked funds to pay for money orders its agents had issued.
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BUSINESS
October 28, 1989
A court-appointed receiver will begin trying to restore money to hundreds of customers of United Express Money Order Co. of Long Beach, a firm that the state shut down this week after finding that it lacked funds to pay for money orders its agents had issued.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Corporations said late Thursday that it has shut down a money order firm that did not have the funds to pay for the money orders its agents issued, which could leave hundreds of consumers unable to pay their bills. The Department of Corporations will seek a court-appointed receiver today to use the few remaining assets of Long Beach-based United Express Money Order Co. to pay the holders of the bad money orders, said senior counsel Judy Hartley.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Department of Corporations said late Thursday that it has shut down a money order firm that did not have the funds to pay for the money orders its agents issued, which could leave hundreds of consumers unable to pay their bills. The Department of Corporations will seek a court-appointed receiver today to use the few remaining assets of Long Beach-based United Express Money Order Co. to pay the holders of the bad money orders, said senior counsel Judy Hartley.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the world of billion-dollar financial collapses, the state seizure of an obscure Southern California money order company last December attracted scant public attention because it involved a mere $3.2-million shortage. But the demise of General Money Order Co. has left in debt an estimated 100,000 people, most of them poor Latino immigrants or African-Americans who had unwittingly used the worthless paper to pay everything from rent to immigration fees.
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