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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2006 | From a Times Staff Writer
The results of a September 2005 election in which workers at Giumarra Vineyards narrowly voted against joining the United Farm Workers should be thrown out, a hearing examiner for the state's Agricultural Labor Relations Board has recommended. The election had been seen as a defeat for the UFW in its organizing efforts at Giumarra, one of the country's largest table grape growers, with vineyards extending over many miles of the Central Valley.
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NEWS
November 3, 2000
Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farm Workers of America, is improving and acknowledging friends and family members after three surgeries to stop intestinal bleeding, a Bakersfield hospital spokesman said. Huerta remained in critical condition and her prognosis was guarded Thursday, more than a week after she was first sent to Bakersfield Heart Hospital with a bleeding ulcer. An arterial abnormality was discovered later and repaired over the weekend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2006 | Jessica Garrison, Times Staff Writer
Several thousand farmworkers from as far away as Oregon marched in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday to celebrate the life of Cesar Chavez and protest proposed federal legislation that would crack down on undocumented immigrants. The crowd at the march and rally, which culminated with a Mass honoring Chavez at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, was estimated by police at 3,800.
NEWS
November 1, 2000
Dolores Huerta, co-founder of the United Farm Workers of America, remained in critical but stable condition Tuesday at a Bakersfield hospital, two days after surgery to stop internal bleeding. Huerta, 70, who stepped down as the union's secretary-treasurer in September, originally was admitted to Heart Hospital last Wednesday for a bleeding ulcer, then was readmitted Sunday when her condition worsened.
NEWS
May 28, 1987
The United Farm Workers of America lost another court battle in Imperial County on Wednesday in a case that poses a severe threat to the union's financial health. Imperial County Superior Court Judge William E. Lehnhardt rejected the plea of the UFW that he reduce a $3.3-million bond the union must post by June 5 while it appeals a judgment of more than $1.6-million it has been directed to pay a vegetable grower for losses from a violence-torn 1979 strike.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2003 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
Farmhands at Gallo of Sonoma cast votes Thursday on whether to oust the United Farm Workers of America from the vintner's fields, less than three years after the union won a hard-fought and much-publicized contract there. The fieldworkers gathered at ranches across Sonoma County in Northern California shortly after daybreak to weigh in on the petition to break ties with the UFW, filed with the state Agricultural Labor Relations Board last week by workers.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1989 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
California grape growers have battled Cesar Chavez's United Farm Workers of America for more than 25 years, but total victory for them against the remarkably enduring 62-year-old Chavez isn't on the horizon. The UFW has been badly weakened by the war but it's still fighting. A complete growers' victory would be a tragedy. Though inadequate and flawed, no other nationally known organization besides the UFW exists to plead the cause of farm workers, most of whom still live in deep poverty.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1993 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Most of the workers who plant and harvest America's bountiful crops are still exploited and mired in poverty nearly 30 years after Cesar Chavez began his once promising crusade to help them. You shouldn't get rich leading a charity organization or a crusade to help the poor. Some people do, but not Chavez, president of the United Farm Workers of America. He makes $5,000 a year, which is about the income of the average farm worker.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2003 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
In what could be a symbolic blow to the United Farm Workers of America, field hands at Gallo of Sonoma have petitioned to sever ties with the UFW, less than three years after the union secured a historic and hard-won labor contract there. Employees of the winery, a unit of E. & J. Gallo Winery, are scheduled to vote on the matter Thursday. UFW officials have charged that Gallo representatives illegally pressured workers to sign the petition that will bring union decertification to a vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
One of the nation's largest strawberry growers and the United Farm Workers have reached agreement on a new three-year contract, union officials said. The contract freezes wages for Coastal Berry Co. pickers at the current rate of $7.75 an hour for the first year and provides better medical coverage with lower premiums. Wages will rise 1.5% in both 2007 and 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2006 | Miriam Pawel, Times Staff Writer
Two government agencies, one state and one federal, are reviewing operations of the United Farm Workers and the union's related charities to determine whether the tax-exempt organizations' transactions warrant investigation. Officials with the U.S.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2005 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Since June, the United Farm Workers have urged consumers to boycott Gallo wine. Today, the union plans to use a Gallo vintage to toast the signing of a new labor agreement with California's largest winery. UFW officials heralded the contract as an important win in the union's effort to build its presence in the state's $15-billion wine industry. "We now have the largest winery under contract, and it is a good contract," said Arturo Rodriguez, president of the UFW. For E.&J.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2005 | From Associated Press
The small farmworkers union founded by labor hero Cesar Chavez joined a coalition of labor groups demanding changes in the AFL-CIO as the 50-year-old federation inched closer Friday to breaking up. The United Farm Workers union, organized in 1962 and now consisting of 27,000 members, brings to seven the number of unions in the Change to Win Coalition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2005 | Miriam Pawel, Times Staff Writer
The United Farm Workers launched "a viral boycott" Tuesday against Gallo wines, employing strong rhetoric in the hopes of generating public support for a Web-based campaign to win a more generous contract. Hours later, state officials who regulate union activity in the fields charged that the UFW has failed to bargain in good faith since its contract at Gallo of Sonoma expired in November 2003.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2004 | From Associated Press
About a dozen farmworkers from the Gallo of Sonoma winery sat around the picnic tables of a park on a warm harvest evening, getting a pep talk from a United Farm Workers organizer. "Accion!" -- We need action -- the organizer said, laying out plans for an upcoming march. Workers at Gallo of Sonoma voted a decade ago to join the UFW, but it's been a rocky relationship.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter-century after the United Farm Workers of America created a national movement calling for consumers to boycott Gallo wines, the union has finally won a contract with the winemaker, the world's largest.
NEWS
April 25, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here amid the rolling foothills that Cesar Chavez called home, the leadership of the United Farm Workers of America convened Saturday to send a message: The union's legendary founder and guiding force is gone, but his work goes on. "We must continue la lucha (the struggle)," declared Dolores Huerta, a longtime colleague, during a news conference designed in part to counter perceptions that the passing of Chavez marks the end of his cause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2004 | Gabrielle Banks, Times Staff Writer
One of the oldest battles in California agriculture escalated again Tuesday when a group of Gallo farmworkers who want to oust their union, the United Farm Workers, traveled to the Agricultural Labor Relations Board office to demand that officials count ballots that have been sealed since 2003. In March 2003, Gallo workers voted on whether the union should still represent them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2004 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
In the midst of contract talks, the United Farm Workers is escalating attacks on Gallo of Sonoma with the launch today of an Internet campaign aimed at securing stronger benefits for fieldworkers. Workers in the winery's Sonoma fields have been without a contract since November. Negotiations are expected to resume Wednesday, with union officials vowing to repeat the 1970s Gallo wine boycott if their demands are not met.
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