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December 3, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
Baghdad's Bratha Mosque on Friday had the atmosphere of a politicized revival tent. Election posters blanketed the concrete blast walls outside the Shiite Muslim house of worship, a stronghold of the Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq, or SCIRI. Inside the prayer hall, young boys handed out literature for the United Iraqi Alliance, in which SCIRI is a main partner. Banners and fliers bore the alliance's candle icon and its electoral slate number: 555.
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WORLD
February 16, 2006 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
Only days after deciding to nominate incumbent Ibrahim Jafari to continue as Iraq's prime minister, his United Iraqi Alliance coalition on Wednesday was showing signs of fraying.
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WORLD
March 31, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
He boycotted elections and rejects the validity of the government. For months, he's stayed behind the scenes, allowing others to deliver his Friday sermons and rarely appearing in public. Nevertheless, Muqtada Sadr, an anti-American Shiite Muslim cleric, is emerging as a big winner in the Jan. 30 vote, thanks to some of his followers who won seats in the National Assembly with different slates and are forging their own alliance.
WORLD
December 16, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
Here in Iraq's southern Shiite Muslim heartland, the issue of the day Thursday was the relationship between mosque and state. Shiite voters who streamed to the polls to elect a full-term legislature cited religion and its place in government as the guiding factor in how they cast their ballots. "Religion is not politics," said Hamza Abdel Hussein, a 65-year-old retiree who voted for secular Shiite candidate Mithal Alusi. "Our intention is to separate religion from government."
WORLD
April 12, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
When Iraq's new government finally emerged last week and the nation's political heavyweights stood before the National Assembly, shaking hands and accepting congratulations, one man was noticeably absent from the stage: Iyad Allawi, who had served as prime minister since last summer. So far, Allawi has no role in the new administration.
WORLD
March 6, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
The senior Shiite Muslim cleric in Iraq called Saturday on members of the transitional national assembly elected more than a month ago to move quickly to form a government. Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani's comments were directed primarily at members of the United Iraqi Alliance, which was formed with his backing and which won a slim majority of assembly seats in the Jan. 30 elections.
WORLD
February 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Top Shiite Muslim politicians failed to agree Wednesday on their nominee for prime minister, shifting the race to a secret ballot. The United Iraqi Alliance is expected Friday to choose between Ibrahim Jafari and Ahmad Chalabi, said Ali Hashim Youshaa, an alliance leader. Jafari, believed to be 57, leads the religious Islamic Dawa Party, known for its close ties to Iran. Jafari is a moderate, but his party's platform is conservative.
WORLD
March 8, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Insurgents carried out a wave of car bombings and other attacks in at least four Iraqi cities and towns Monday, killing 32 people and injuring dozens more. The violence came as Iraqi politicians admitted that they were still days, if not weeks, away from a deal to form a government.
WORLD
February 24, 2005 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
One day after the dominant Shiite-led coalition unanimously nominated interim Vice President Ibrahim Jafari to lead the new Iraqi government, interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi said Wednesday that he would stand as a rival candidate for the job and try to build a winning bloc by reaching out to other political slates.
WORLD
December 5, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi and Saad Fakhrildeen, Special to The Times
One of Iraq's most prominent politicians and his entourage were pelted with rocks and shoes Sunday as they left a shrine, escalating tensions between religious and secular Shiite Muslim factions 11 days before a parliamentary election that will set the country's course for the next four years.
WORLD
December 5, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi and Saad Fakhrildeen, Special to The Times
One of Iraq's most prominent politicians and his entourage were pelted with rocks and shoes Sunday as they left a shrine, escalating tensions between religious and secular Shiite Muslim factions 11 days before a parliamentary election that will set the country's course for the next four years.
WORLD
December 3, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
Baghdad's Bratha Mosque on Friday had the atmosphere of a politicized revival tent. Election posters blanketed the concrete blast walls outside the Shiite Muslim house of worship, a stronghold of the Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq, or SCIRI. Inside the prayer hall, young boys handed out literature for the United Iraqi Alliance, in which SCIRI is a main partner. Banners and fliers bore the alliance's candle icon and its electoral slate number: 555.
WORLD
April 12, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
When Iraq's new government finally emerged last week and the nation's political heavyweights stood before the National Assembly, shaking hands and accepting congratulations, one man was noticeably absent from the stage: Iyad Allawi, who had served as prime minister since last summer. So far, Allawi has no role in the new administration.
WORLD
March 31, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
He boycotted elections and rejects the validity of the government. For months, he's stayed behind the scenes, allowing others to deliver his Friday sermons and rarely appearing in public. Nevertheless, Muqtada Sadr, an anti-American Shiite Muslim cleric, is emerging as a big winner in the Jan. 30 vote, thanks to some of his followers who won seats in the National Assembly with different slates and are forging their own alliance.
WORLD
March 29, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
Negotiators met late into the night Monday but chances appeared remote that they would agree on a new Iraqi government or a speaker for the National Assembly in time for today's second assembly meeting. Long-standing plans to introduce outgoing interim President Ghazi Ajil Yawer as speaker of the new National Assembly appeared to hit a snag. Yawer, a prominent Sunni Arab tribal leader, told several Arab satellite TV channels that he intended to refuse the position.
WORLD
March 8, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Insurgents carried out a wave of car bombings and other attacks in at least four Iraqi cities and towns Monday, killing 32 people and injuring dozens more. The violence came as Iraqi politicians admitted that they were still days, if not weeks, away from a deal to form a government.
WORLD
December 16, 2005 | Ashraf Khalil, Times Staff Writer
Here in Iraq's southern Shiite Muslim heartland, the issue of the day Thursday was the relationship between mosque and state. Shiite voters who streamed to the polls to elect a full-term legislature cited religion and its place in government as the guiding factor in how they cast their ballots. "Religion is not politics," said Hamza Abdel Hussein, a 65-year-old retiree who voted for secular Shiite candidate Mithal Alusi. "Our intention is to separate religion from government."
WORLD
February 5, 2005 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
A Shiite Muslim-dominated political slate with links to Iran and to Iraq's leading ayatollah has amassed what appears to be a commanding lead in Iraq's landmark parliamentary election, according to partial results released Friday. With votes now tabulated from more than one-third of the polling stations in Sunday's election, more than 2.2 million Iraqis cast ballots for the United Iraqi Alliance, a ticket whose top candidate is a cleric long based in neighboring Iran.
WORLD
March 6, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
The senior Shiite Muslim cleric in Iraq called Saturday on members of the transitional national assembly elected more than a month ago to move quickly to form a government. Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani's comments were directed primarily at members of the United Iraqi Alliance, which was formed with his backing and which won a slim majority of assembly seats in the Jan. 30 elections.
WORLD
February 24, 2005 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
One day after the dominant Shiite-led coalition unanimously nominated interim Vice President Ibrahim Jafari to lead the new Iraqi government, interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi said Wednesday that he would stand as a rival candidate for the job and try to build a winning bloc by reaching out to other political slates.
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