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United Latino Fund

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Destino 2000 fund reaches its goal of a $400,000 endowment in the next few weeks, it will become a permanent source of grants for Ventura County charities that serve the Latino community. The 5-year-old fund represents the successful coming together of the county's Latino business and political leadership to promote philanthropy within and for their community.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Destino 2000 fund reaches its goal of a $400,000 endowment in the next few weeks, it will become a permanent source of grants for Ventura County charities that serve the Latino community. The 5-year-old fund represents the successful coming together of the county's Latino business and political leadership to promote philanthropy within and for their community.
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NEWS
March 21, 2000 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Away from the philanthropic foundations housed in high-rises, with their fancy luncheons and multimillion-dollar grants to universities and museums and the like, there is another more grass-roots, community-based level of giving in California that largely remains out of the mainstream. In this state of shifting demographics, there is the world of storefront nonprofits in East L.A.
NEWS
March 21, 2000 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Away from the philanthropic foundations housed in high-rises, with their fancy luncheons and multimillion-dollar grants to universities and museums and the like, there is another more grass-roots, community-based level of giving in California that largely remains out of the mainstream. In this state of shifting demographics, there is the world of storefront nonprofits in East L.A.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reception room high in a fancy downtown L.A. hotel, Tony Espinoza surveys a gathering of leaders in the growing area of Latino-based philanthropy and announces new funding for his L.A.-based United Latino Fund. Those in the room--among them leaders of other Latino funds from around the country and the vice chancellor of the California State University system--listen as other speakers vow to continue their work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1991 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday expanded the list of charities authorized to solicit millions of dollars in contributions from county employees to include Asian, Latino and women's groups, and most notably, an environmental organization. Supervisors added the Asian Pacific Community Fund, the United Latino Fund and the Los Angeles Women's Fund to voluntary employee payroll deduction program.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In tens of thousands of American workplaces, the appearance of United Way pledge cards is an autumn ritual as routine as the end of daylight-saving time. For decades, local arms of the philanthropic powerhouse have enjoyed near-exclusive rights to raising charitable dollars--billions of them--through employee payroll deductions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1991
Los Angeles County supervisors are to vote Tuesday on a proposal to add three community support organizations to a payroll deduction program. The twaddle that passes for analysis in one section of the proposal may leave them choking with laughter. They should steel themselves to vote, however, because buried in the twaddle is an important issue. Four groups applied in May for a place on the roster from which about 85,000 county employees may select groups to which they want to give money.
NEWS
February 7, 1990
In response to Maurice T. Wald's column, "As Los Angeles Transforms So Must the United Way," California Commentary, Jan. 22: The results of United Way's strategic planning process should be of no great surprise to anyone who lives or works in the Greater Los Angeles area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over Brotherhood Crusade leader Danny Bakewell's campaign to shut down a Korean grocery store moved to a new front Wednesday, as his backers and detractors clashed over whether Los Angeles County government workers should fund his organization through payroll deductions.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a reception room high in a fancy downtown L.A. hotel, Tony Espinoza surveys a gathering of leaders in the growing area of Latino-based philanthropy and announces new funding for his L.A.-based United Latino Fund. Those in the room--among them leaders of other Latino funds from around the country and the vice chancellor of the California State University system--listen as other speakers vow to continue their work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1991 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors Tuesday expanded the list of charities authorized to solicit millions of dollars in contributions from county employees to include Asian, Latino and women's groups, and most notably, an environmental organization. Supervisors added the Asian Pacific Community Fund, the United Latino Fund and the Los Angeles Women's Fund to voluntary employee payroll deduction program.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In tens of thousands of American workplaces, the appearance of United Way pledge cards is an autumn ritual as routine as the end of daylight-saving time. For decades, local arms of the philanthropic powerhouse have enjoyed near-exclusive rights to raising charitable dollars--billions of them--through employee payroll deductions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1992 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Restructuring the way it collects and distributes tens of millions of dollars, the United Way of Greater Los Angeles will soon allow donors to have more control over which organizations receive their contributions, officials announced Friday.
NEWS
April 6, 1999 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not that Latinos don't care about philanthropy. It's just that they have a distinct way of giving--one that tends to go undetected by the Internal Revenue Service and others who monitor philanthropy. Rather than donate priceless works of art or write checks to their favorite charities, Latinos contribute more at a grass-roots level.
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