Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsUnited Minority Contractors
IN THE NEWS

United Minority Contractors

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 26, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to bring badly needed jobs to their area's residents, religious leaders and black-owned contractors from southern Los Angeles have banded together to pressure damaged businesses to award the contractors post-riot construction work. More than two dozen black-owned contractors have formed a corporation, called United Minority Contractors, seeking to boost their chances to receive potentially lucrative post-riot construction work.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1993 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fledgling minority contractors group that rose from the ashes of the 1992 riots hopes to breathe new life into the city's oldest high-rise, the down-in-the-heels Continental Building in Downtown Los Angeles. The United Minority Contractors Assn., which helped reconstruct several business buildings damaged during the riots, has signed an agreement to purchase the 12-story structure at Spring and 4th streets, a block south of the Ronald Reagan State Building.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 30, 1993 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heat, dust and the whining of saws did little to dim the smiles Thursday as Taco Bell and a coalition of minority contractors announced that a new Compton store was being built by a black-owned contractor employing community residents. But underlying the goodwill was continuing frustration that black and other minority contracting firms have won far too little of the construction work that resulted from the riots' devastation and the subsequent pledges of rebuilding from large corporations.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1993 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heat, dust and the whining of saws did little to dim the smiles Thursday as Taco Bell and a coalition of minority contractors announced that a new Compton store was being built by a black-owned contractor employing community residents. But underlying the goodwill was continuing frustration that black and other minority contracting firms have won far too little of the construction work that resulted from the riots' devastation and the subsequent pledges of rebuilding from large corporations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1993 | PAUL FELDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A fledgling minority contractors group that rose from the ashes of the 1992 riots hopes to breathe new life into the city's oldest high-rise, the down-in-the-heels Continental Building in Downtown Los Angeles. The United Minority Contractors Assn., which helped reconstruct several business buildings damaged during the riots, has signed an agreement to purchase the 12-story structure at Spring and 4th streets, a block south of the Ronald Reagan State Building.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1992 | OTTO STRONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vera Joseph needed only one store. But all that changed when the Hollywood Sears outlet that she had frequented for 25 years became a casualty of last spring's riots. Back-to-school shopping for her five children became a grueling experience. "I like to go to one store," Joseph said. "I have three boys and I always bought their jeans here. I like the guarantee."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1992 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Farmer's Insurance Co., the largest commercial insurer in the parts of Los Angeles heavily damaged by rioting, announced Monday that it will begin supplying policyholders with a list of minority contractors available for reconstruction work. Representatives of contractors who have demonstrated at construction sites, demanding that property owners and insurance companies hire minority contractors from the area, said Farmer's move was important--but only a beginning.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From South-Central to Downtown and throughout Central Los Angeles, many area residents and organizations are offering relief to those affected by the devastating firestorms that have swept the Southland. About 100 students from the United Minority Contractors Trade School in South-Central volunteered last week to help Malibu residents find their possessions and clean up their city.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bitter dispute over the lack of construction work awarded to residents of riot-scarred Los Angeles neighborhoods is presenting Peter V. Ueberroth, head of Rebuild L. A., with a crucial test of his ability to reconcile disparate business and community interests. Minority contractors and community groups say reconstruction work arising out of the riots is being funneled to outsiders rather than to residents of South Los Angeles, where it is estimated that 50% of the men are unemployed.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1994 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Construction firms are already cleaning up--literally and figuratively--under emergency contracts to remove freeway damage from Monday's earthquake, while others stand to benefit handsomely from rebuilding work that will keep them busy for at least the next year. Three major demolition firms won four contracts worth $3.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1992 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to bring badly needed jobs to their area's residents, religious leaders and black-owned contractors from southern Los Angeles have banded together to pressure damaged businesses to award the contractors post-riot construction work. More than two dozen black-owned contractors have formed a corporation, called United Minority Contractors, seeking to boost their chances to receive potentially lucrative post-riot construction work.
NEWS
October 4, 1992 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ronald Jackson, known as O. G. Raider when he ran with the Santana Block of the Compton Crips, once had a limited resume. There was just one entry--drug dealer. Then he did 4 1/2 years in state prison. Not much of a recommendation for a job-seeker. But a chance contact led to work on the reconstruction of the Sears store in Hollywood, which was looted, torched in five places and waterlogged after the spring riots.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|