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United Nations Afghanistan

NEWS
August 7, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Gunmen shot and killed 12 people, including seven Afghans working for the United Nations' mine clearing agency, in the western province of Herat, an aid worker said in Kabul, the capital. The seven mine clearers, all employees of the Organization for Mine Clearance and Afghan Rehabilitation, were killed near Kotal-e-Subzak on Saturday on the road between Badghis and Herat provinces, an official of the organization said.
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NEWS
July 2, 2000 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years after Taliban clerics abolished most of the rights of women in Afghanistan, a fortunate few are finding solace--and survival--in baking loaves of bread. About 350 women, some with professional degrees, fan out across the ruins of this city each morning, shed their mandatory head-to-toe burkas and plunge their hands into mounds of dough.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations ignored last-minute pleas from Afghanistan's ruling Taliban militia and imposed sanctions to demand the arrest of suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden. The U.N. is insisting that Bin Laden be handed over to the United States or a third country to stand trial on charges of masterminding the August 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa, which killed 224 people. The economic sanctions took effect at 9 p.m. Saturday PST. The U.N.
NEWS
October 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
Afghanistan's Taliban leaders rejected a U.N. ultimatum to surrender suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden and castigated the world body Saturday for threatening sanctions. "We will never give up Osama at any price," Mullah Mohammed Hassan Akhund, the Taliban's foreign minister, said in a statement addressed to U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan. The U.N.
NEWS
October 16, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Friday to impose financial and aviation sanctions in 30 days against Afghanistan's Taliban rulers unless Saudi militant Osama bin Laden is turned over for trial on terrorism charges. The measure deplored the fact that the Taliban, a strict Islamic movement that controls most of Afghanistan, provides a haven for Bin Laden. The Saudi millionaire was charged in New York last year in the August 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.
NEWS
October 7, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States asked the U.N. Security Council on Wednesday to impose strict sanctions on Afghanistan's Taliban rulers until they turn over Islamic extremist Osama bin Laden, charged with plotting the bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania that killed 224 people last year.
NEWS
March 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
The United Nations is returning some of its international staff to Afghanistan after a seven-month absence sparked by the killings of three U.N. staffers in July and August. The top U.N. humanitarian coordinator, Sergio Vieira de Mello, cited progress by Afghanistan's Taliban militia in investigating the killings, as well as evidence of Taliban efforts to address U.N. security concerns.
NEWS
October 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Afghanistan's ruling Taliban militia on Friday rejected an invitation from a U.N. envoy to negotiate an end to its border standoff with neighboring Iran. U.N. envoy Lakhdar Brahimi issued the offer in neighboring Pakistan in an attempt to ease tensions created by a massive troop deployment along the border that separates Iran and Afghanistan.
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Taliban offered to stop growing poppies--which help make Afghanistan the world's second-largest opium producer after the Golden Triangle of Southeast Asia--in exchange for recognition by the United Nations as the government of the country. Mullah Mohammed Omar, the supreme leader of the Islamic militia, made the offer in remarks that were broadcast by the Taliban over the radio. Only Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates recognize the Taliban as the government of Afghanistan.
NEWS
February 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
Bad weather blocked relief flights to quake-stricken northeastern Afghanistan again Monday, frustrating aid workers who had managed to get only one flight through in four days. An estimated 30,000 people in the remote mountains of the northeast are cold, hungry and badly in need of shelter and food after a powerful Feb. 4 quake that crumbled villages and killed an estimated 4,500 people. On Monday, two U.N.
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