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NEWS
March 25, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is upset with deadbeat diplomats at the United Nations, who owe more than $7 million to landlords, banks, hospitals, hotels, service stations and other creditors in the New York area. The embarrassing situation not only angers creditors, he says, but it handicaps other diplomats seeking apartments, medical care and other services. Not much can be done about the problem aside from scolding.
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WORLD
February 19, 2003 | Maggie Farley and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
As a parade of U.N. ambassadors added their voices to the chorus of global protests that took place over the weekend, President Bush said Tuesday that broad opposition to a war with Iraq won't deter White House plans to disarm Saddam Hussein -- by force, if necessary. "I welcome people's right to say what they believe," Bush told reporters. But he added that he had to "respectfully disagree" with those who think the Iraqi president is not a threat to peace.
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WORLD
February 19, 2003 | Maggie Farley and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
As a parade of U.N. ambassadors added their voices to the chorus of global protests that took place over the weekend, President Bush said Tuesday that broad opposition to a war with Iraq won't deter White House plans to disarm Saddam Hussein -- by force, if necessary. "I welcome people's right to say what they believe," Bush told reporters. But he added that he had to "respectfully disagree" with those who think the Iraqi president is not a threat to peace.
NEWS
March 25, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is upset with deadbeat diplomats at the United Nations, who owe more than $7 million to landlords, banks, hospitals, hotels, service stations and other creditors in the New York area. The embarrassing situation not only angers creditors, he says, but it handicaps other diplomats seeking apartments, medical care and other services. Not much can be done about the problem aside from scolding.
NEWS
May 20, 1988
David L. Guyer, 62, president of Save the Children Federation from 1977 to 1987. Guyer also worked for the United Nations in Pakistan, India and Nepal and from 1960 to 1965 was a member of the U.S. mission to the United Nations under Ambassadors Henry Cabot Lodge and Adlai E. Stevenson. Guyer retired from the Save the Children Federation, which is active in 44 countries including the United States, when his health failed last year. In Honolulu on Saturday of brain cancer.
SPORTS
September 8, 2010 | By Diane Pucin
Rohan Bopanna is from India, Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi is from Pakistan, and for that reason what they have accomplished at the U.S. Open is worthy of praise. They have made it to the men's doubles finals. They beat Argentina's Eduardo Schwank and Horacio Zeballos, 7-6 (5), 6-4, on Wednesday and on Friday will play top-ranked Bob and Mike Bryan, the Camarillo twins who are the winningest doubles team in history. But that isn't what matters most. It wasn't the classic movement around the court, the choreography of good doubles teams who two-step, sidestep, step up, step back to cover all the space that was good to see. It was there, sitting in the stands, side by side, the United Nations ambassadors from India and Pakistan, two countries that have fought three wars since 1947 when they gained independence from Britain.
NEWS
February 21, 2002 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Andres Pastrana broke off peace negotiations with the country's largest rebel group, giving the guerrillas until noon today to leave the special demilitarized zone created for talks. In a nationally televised address, Pastrana said guerrillas from the FARC--the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia--had crossed the line Wednesday when they hijacked a plane and kidnapped Sen. Jorge Gechen Turbay, 50, president of the Colombian Senate's peace commission.
WORLD
June 11, 2006 | Maggie Farley and Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writers
U.N. Security Council diplomats wanted to see for themselves how the conflict in the Darfur region of Sudan is bleeding across the border into Chad. And so, in a snaking convoy of 17 white SUVs, the ambassadors arrived Saturday at the tallest tree in the camp for displaced people here, where thousands had gathered to tell their stories and ask for help. During the ambassadors' brief visit, they heard firsthand how borders make little difference when it comes to war.
SPORTS
September 10, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
The sounds of silence around the U.S. Open on Saturday will be the collective breath-holding of U.S. Tennis Assn. officials. The prayer they will be praying will be that Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer win their way into Sunday's final. The sounds of silence around the U.S. Open on Saturday will be the collective breath-holding of U.S. Tennis Assn. officials. The prayer they will be offering, and the words they cannot be saying, will be that Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer win their way into Sunday's final.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2004 | Edith M. Lederer, Associated Press
As Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn film "The Interpreter" on location at the United Nations, many ambassadors are mad -- because all the diplomats in the movie are impostors. "It was my dream that I was going to be in a movie with Sydney Pollack directing. He's one of my heroes in the movie industry," said Spain's U.N. ambassador, Inocencio Arias, who has appeared in many Spanish films and said he had lined up a part as a prime minister.
WORLD
October 17, 2002 | Robin Wright, Tyler Marshall and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers
WASHINGTON -- Bowing to pressure from France and Russia, the United States on Wednesday offered a compromise proposal that would call for serious "consequences" if Iraq does not comply with tough weapons inspections -- but would not seek authorization for military action without further discussions at the world body. The compromise, outlined Wednesday by Secretary of State Colin L.
NEWS
January 31, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Tick, tock, tick, tock . . . . That's the sound of time passing, 25 years in the case of Commentary magazine editor Norman Podhoretz, or 40 if you count the lifetime of that journal of opinion, published since just after World War II by the American Jewish Committee. Left, right, center, right . . . .
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