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February 4, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Past bombed-out buildings and burned-out cars, near grim skull-and-crossbones signs for a roadside minefield, a dusty cluster of military tents here holds the hopes for lasting peace in Africa's longest civil war. But Angola has dashed such hopes before. And despite a shaky 14 1/2-month cease-fire after two decades of death and devastation, it may be doing it again.
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NEWS
April 19, 2000 | Associated Press
The Security Council on Tuesday warned countries accused of violating sanctions against Angola's UNITA rebels that they may face U.N. penalties for having helped the rebels restart their war with the government. In a unanimously adopted resolution, the council gave the accused six months to challenge an independent report on embargo breaches and demonstrate their adherence to sanctions before the council considers taking action.
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NEWS
September 16, 1993 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jonas Savimbi, once America's favored guerrilla chieftain, felt the wrath of the United Nations on Wednesday as the Security Council condemned his rebellion against the Angolan government and approved sanctions against his political movement. The council acted after receiving a report from Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali that 1,000 people are dying every day from the war, "the highest fatality rate of any conflict in the world."
NEWS
March 16, 2000 |
Several African nations accused of violating sanctions against Angola's rebels criticized the U.N. report containing the charges. Other diplomats questioned the evidence supporting the accusations, including charges that the presidents of two nations helped arm UNITA rebels. The chairman of the U.N. Sanctions Committee on Angola, Ambassador Robert Fowler of Canada, defended the report as solid and meticulous.
NEWS
March 16, 2000 |
Several African nations accused of violating sanctions against Angola's rebels criticized the U.N. report containing the charges. Other diplomats questioned the evidence supporting the accusations, including charges that the presidents of two nations helped arm UNITA rebels. The chairman of the U.N. Sanctions Committee on Angola, Ambassador Robert Fowler of Canada, defended the report as solid and meticulous.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations gave the government and rebels in Angola notice of the flight plan for a plane that was shot down, a U.N. spokesman said. The plane was believed hit by antiaircraft fire and went down Saturday with eight people aboard. There was no word on survivors. The C-130 was the second U.N.-chartered aircraft to crash in the war zone in eight days.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos has promised to help a U.N. team reach the wreckage of two U.N.-chartered planes that recently crashed in a war zone with a total of 22 people on board, U.N. special envoy Benon Sevan said. However, Sevan did not win government assurances of a cease-fire so a U.N. rescue team can search for survivors.
NEWS
January 5, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 days, U.N. staff members have waited with anger and frustration to find out the fate of 10 colleagues aboard a plane that crashed in Angola. Both sides in the African nation's civil war have refused to stop fighting long enough to allow rescuers to reach the crash site. Over the weekend, a second aircraft with U.N. personnel was reported shot down over Angola, and their fate also remains uncertain.
NEWS
April 19, 2000 | Associated Press
The Security Council on Tuesday warned countries accused of violating sanctions against Angola's UNITA rebels that they may face U.N. penalties for having helped the rebels restart their war with the government. In a unanimously adopted resolution, the council gave the accused six months to challenge an independent report on embargo breaches and demonstrate their adherence to sanctions before the council considers taking action.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council imposed air and travel sanctions on the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) and ordered the closing of the former rebels' offices abroad for flouting 1994 peace accords aimed at ending two decades of civil war in the southwest African nation. The sanctions were endorsed by a unanimous 15-0 vote amid fears of renewed conflict. They will go into effect early Saturday.
NEWS
March 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
Two sitting African presidents are among several officials implicated in a U.N. report that details sanctions violations that have enabled rebels in Angola to finance their war, two sources who read the report said Friday. Presidents Gnassingbe Eyadema of Togo and Blaise Compaore of Burkina Faso are accused of having allowed sanctions-breaking activities in their countries, the sources said on condition of anonymity. The U.N.
NEWS
January 24, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was simply no stopping him, Hilton Wilkinson's mother recalls. A son's unspoken love for his father is not something to be reasoned with. "I want to bring Daddy back, dead or alive," Wilkinson told his mother and two sisters in suburban Johannesburg, South Africa. The distraught young pilot then left home for this capital city where, until a few months ago, he worked for a charter company. Wilkinson, 25, boarded United Nations Flight 806A here Jan.
NEWS
January 13, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Angola's UNITA rebel group told the United Nations that it located the wreckage of a second U.N.-chartered transport plane, which crashed Jan. 2 with nine aboard, U.N. officials reported. Initial reports said no survivors were found. Meanwhile, the U.N. Security Council voted to consider imposing new sanctions on UNITA.
NEWS
January 9, 1999 | From Associated Press
An international rescue team reached the crash site Friday of a U.N. plane that went down two weeks ago in central Angola. One journalist reported seeing burned and mangled bodies among the wreckage. The plane was carrying 14 people when it crashed Dec. 26. U.N. spokesman Hamadoun Toure said he expects an update soon from the investigation team, but he could not say when that information would be released.
NEWS
January 7, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Angolan President Jose Eduardo dos Santos has promised to help a U.N. team reach the wreckage of two U.N.-chartered planes that recently crashed in a war zone with a total of 22 people on board, U.N. special envoy Benon Sevan said. However, Sevan did not win government assurances of a cease-fire so a U.N. rescue team can search for survivors.
NEWS
January 5, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 10 days, U.N. staff members have waited with anger and frustration to find out the fate of 10 colleagues aboard a plane that crashed in Angola. Both sides in the African nation's civil war have refused to stop fighting long enough to allow rescuers to reach the crash site. Over the weekend, a second aircraft with U.N. personnel was reported shot down over Angola, and their fate also remains uncertain.
NEWS
November 5, 1992 | Reuters
The United Nations said Wednesday that 20 Brazilian and 50 Russian workers had been kidnaped by opposition UNITA soldiers in southern Angola, where they were working on a dam project. U.N. spokesman Joe Sills said U.N. staff in Angola were told that the group "had been seized by UNITA forces and we are looking into that." He gave no further details. Violence erupted after Jonas Savimbi, leader of the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA), rejected the results of U.N.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | Times Wire Services
The United Nations said Saturday that it is planning an urgent relief flight into Huambo, Angola's second-largest city, which has been left in ruins after a two-month battle. The move is in response to an appeal by the rebel National Union for the Total Independence of Angola, or UNITA, which drove the army out of the strategic city in fighting that left thousands dead. Also Saturday, a U.S. official in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, said UNITA had proposed that peace talks be held next month.
NEWS
January 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The United Nations gave the government and rebels in Angola notice of the flight plan for a plane that was shot down, a U.N. spokesman said. The plane was believed hit by antiaircraft fire and went down Saturday with eight people aboard. There was no word on survivors. The C-130 was the second U.N.-chartered aircraft to crash in the war zone in eight days.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | From Associated Press
Rebel forces Saturday shot down a U.N.-chartered cargo plane, the second United Nations plane apparently attacked in Angola's central highland war zone in eight days, U.N. officials said. The C-130 aircraft, with eight people aboard, including one American, was hit by antiaircraft fire 20 minutes after it took off from the city of Huambo, about 325 miles southeast of Luanda, the capital, U.N. spokesman Hamadoun Toure said.
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