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NEWS
July 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
The rift between the United Nations and Bosnia-Herzegovina's leaders widened Friday when the Muslim-led government said it will no longer deal with top U.N. envoy Yasushi Akashi. The shift came after the government asked the U.N. Security Council to review the peacekeepers' mission in Bosnia. "We don't talk to Yasushi Akashi anymore," Hasan Muratovic, the minister in charge of U.N. relations, told a Norwegian newspaper. "For us, he does not exist anymore."
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NEWS
August 12, 2001 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After three decades in the courtroom trenches, from California to Washington to Europe, Mark Harmon has seen his share of crime scenes. None comes close, however, to the landscape of death the senior war crimes prosecutor visited in Bosnia-Herzegovina two years ago as he prepared for his latest case: the slaughter of more than 7,000 Muslim men and boys in the town of Srebrenica in 1995. Escorted by an armed column of U.S.
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NEWS
July 4, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raising further questions about the future of the United Nations in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbian separatists pummeled U.N. convoys with antiaircraft weapons Monday for the second day running. The U.N. response was swift but characteristically mild. The attack on U.N. convoys navigating the perilous Mt. Igman road out of Sarajevo was the latest in a series of Serbian assaults on U.N. peacekeepers, whose reluctance to clash with the Serbs has rendered the U.N. mission largely impotent.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague convicted three former Bosnian Serb commanders of rape and torture Thursday in the first international trial to focus exclusively on wartime sexual violence. The three received sentences ranging from 12 to 28 years for enslaving Muslim women and girls in "rape camps" during the Bosnian war, after Serbian forces overran the southeastern town of Foca in April 1992.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | ART PINE and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. and NATO forces carried out a series of air strikes and artillery attacks against Bosnian Serb targets around Sarajevo early today in retaliation for the Serbs' lethal shelling of the capital on Monday. The attacks, which were aimed at Bosnian Serb air-defense batteries, radar sites and communication facilities south and east of the city, struck close to Pale, the rebel capital.
NEWS
June 6, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until the rain came, the men and women stood under the equestrian statue of Prince Mihailo, who freed Serbia from Turkish rule more than a century ago, and raised their voices to the dream of a Greater Serbia. "Karadzic! Karadzic!" they shouted, hailing the hard-line Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, who at that moment was holding U.N. peacekeepers, and most of the world, hostage. "Down with Slobo! Down with traitors!"
NEWS
August 8, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Croatian government declared a successful close Monday to its 3 1/2-day offensive against secessionist Krajina Serbs, officially ending one of the most lopsided campaigns in the last four years of fighting in the Balkans. But across Croatia, as tens of thousands of Serb refugees scurried for shelter, fears grew that the military strike may have created--not prevented--new instability in the region. U.N.
NEWS
May 31, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Front pages of newspapers across France on Tuesday carried stark images of this country's brave young troops in manacles--solemn soldiers handcuffed to poles, some handcuffed to each other and others with arms raised in surrender to Bosnian Serbs. These photographs alone might, in another country, stir deep anger, galvanize public opinion and touch off endless political soul-searching. And, to be sure, families of the 4,000 or so French troops on duty with the U.N.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | PETER MAASS, THE WASHINGTON POST
A soldier in the Bosnian Serb army assassinated Bosnian Deputy Prime Minister Hakija Turajlic on Friday at an illegal roadblock near the Sarajevo airport, pushing aside a French U.N. commander to gun down the Muslim politician as he sat in a U.N. armored personnel carrier. The killing, which occurred 400 yards from the French-run U.N. command post, dealt a major blow to the standing of U.N. peacekeeping forces in Bosnia and jeopardized U.N.-sponsored peace talks due to resume Sunday in Geneva.
NEWS
December 16, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Security Council cleared the last legal obstacle Friday for President Clinton's dispatch of American troops to Bosnia, but the U.N. body acted only after a startling and bitter clash between U.S. Ambassador Madeleine Albright and Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali. In the confrontation behind closed doors, Boutros-Ghali denounced Albright's criticism of his report on Croatia as shocking in its "vulgarity."
NEWS
January 15, 2000 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a benchmark case firmly establishing "ethnic cleansing" as a crime against humanity, a U.N. tribunal convicted five ethnic Croats on Friday in a 1993 rampage of killing and destruction in a Bosnian town that left more than 100 Muslims dead. The verdict by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia set a crucial precedent, court officials said, because the judges for the first time broadened existing international law to include ethnic cleansing.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The skeleton flops, like a tattered rag doll, as it is placed in a white body bag and taken away by investigators digging through a new find--one of Bosnia's many hidden mass graves. A team of 30 forensic specialists, international detectives and anthropologists chips away at sunbaked dirt to recover victims of what human rights officials have called the bloodiest atrocity in Europe since World War II: the fall of the city of Srebrenica in the summer of 1995.
NEWS
April 9, 1998 | From Associated Press
The NATO-led peace force Wednesday arrested two Bosnian Serbs suspected of prison camp atrocities and said the men will be sent to the U.N. war crimes tribunal. The two did not resist, and no one was hurt in the military operation in the Serb-held town of Prijedor in northwest Bosnia, NATO spokesman Maj. Louis Garneau said. There were no Serbian demonstrations or other indications of tension in the region after the arrests, Garneau said.
NEWS
March 10, 1998 | From Associated Press
A Bosnian Serb paramilitary officer pleaded guilty Monday to raping four Muslim women in an eastern Bosnian town in 1992. It marked the first time an international court won a conviction treating rape--in and of itself--as a war crime. Dragoljub Kunarac pleaded guilty to a crime against humanity. He is only the third suspect convicted by the U.N. court prosecuting atrocities in the former Yugoslav federation--and the first convicted of rape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1997 | SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outgoing Los Angeles Deputy Police Chief Mark Kroeker hunkered over his living room coffee table, peering down at a map of Bosnia and speaking energetically about the region's political complexities and challenges when suddenly he stopped in mid-sentence. "It makes me feel like a rookie again," he observed between packing suitcases of spare clothes, classical music recordings and family photographs. "I feel the excitement I did just before I joined the LAPD."
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A United Nations helicopter plowed into a forested mountainside in central Bosnia on Wednesday, killing 12 officials involved in building peace in this country. The dead included one of the top international mediators in the Balkan nation and five Americans, diplomats said. The four-member crew, all Ukrainians, survived the fiery crash in rugged, mountainous terrain about 30 miles northwest of Sarajevo, the capital. An investigation was launched into the cause of the crash.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a step he called "both symbolic and tangible," Secretary of State Warren Christopher announced Thursday that the United States will send a reinforced infantry company of 300 troops to Macedonia to join a U.N. observer force intended to prevent the Balkan war from spilling over into another former Yugoslav republic. Although Macedonia is relatively peaceful and is well away from the Bosnia-Herzegovina war zone, the infantrymen will be the first U.S.
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bosnian Serbs attacking the Muslim "safe area" of Zepa detained Ukrainian U.N. peacekeepers Monday and threatened to kill them if NATO warplanes appear, effectively creating human shields against air strikes and giving the rebel Serbs the upper hand against an indecisive West. Still, Bosnian government forces defending Zepa managed to hold off the onslaught by the better-armed Serbs, at least for the moment, as officials began urgent negotiations to evacuate many of the enclave's 16,000 Muslims.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
The United States would support the use of NATO troops to defend the president of Bosnia's Serb republic, Biljana Plavsic, if Bosnian Serb hard-liners try to topple her by force, senior officials said Thursday. "If there's an attempt to overthrow her, NATO forces are there and will not allow it to happen," special envoy Richard Holbrooke said in an interview. Another official said: "SFOR [the NATO-led peacekeeping force] has broad authority to protect the peace process . . .
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The power struggle dividing Bosnian Serbs exploded into violence Thursday as U.S. troops came under attack from angry mobs and rival police disputed control of this strategic northeastern city. Crowds demanding the expulsion of Western peacekeepers siding with Bosnian Serb President Biljana Plavsic roamed Brcko throughout the day, hurling stones and firebombs. NATO rescued 50 besieged United Nations police monitors, and numerous international officials fled to a nearby U.S. military base.
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