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NEWS
January 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Warning that ethnic tensions in Burundi could explode into "violence on a massive scale," the U.N. chief is urging the Security Council to prepare a force that could intervene in the Central African country. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is unlikely to find support in the council, especially since both the Security Council and Burundi's government rejected a similar proposal in 1994 after more than 500,000 people were massacred in neighboring Rwanda.
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NEWS
January 18, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By day, this bustling city on the sun-soaked shores of Lake Tanganyika displays a deceptive calm. Hutus and Tutsis politely walk, shop and intermingle along its wide tree-lined avenues. But as darkness falls, the superficial serenity of Burundi's capital gives way to a pervasive tension. Though a midnight curfew is in effect, residents on every block take turns keeping vigil in a neighborhood watch program encouraged by the government.
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NEWS
January 30, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The nation's mainly Tutsi army, which grabbed power in a coup last year, has killed at least 1,000 people since the beginning of December, said the United Nations human rights office in Geneva. The office said its evidence showed a new escalation in violence in Burundi's three-year guerrilla war between the army and rebels of the Hutu majority. Hutu rebels are also accused of massacres of civilians and are responsible for killing 58 people in the same period, the U.N. office said.
NEWS
January 30, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The nation's mainly Tutsi army, which grabbed power in a coup last year, has killed at least 1,000 people since the beginning of December, said the United Nations human rights office in Geneva. The office said its evidence showed a new escalation in violence in Burundi's three-year guerrilla war between the army and rebels of the Hutu majority. Hutu rebels are also accused of massacres of civilians and are responsible for killing 58 people in the same period, the U.N. office said.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Nations called for investigations by Burundi's government into a massacre of Hutu civilians by mainly Tutsi troops. U.N. special envoy Ahmedou Ould Abdullah and the U.S. Embassy appealed for the government to establish a commission of inquiry into Wednesday's violence and to publish the results.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By day, this bustling city on the sun-soaked shores of Lake Tanganyika displays a deceptive calm. Hutus and Tutsis politely walk, shop and intermingle along its wide tree-lined avenues. But as darkness falls, the superficial serenity of Burundi's capital gives way to a pervasive tension. Though a midnight curfew is in effect, residents on every block take turns keeping vigil in a neighborhood watch program encouraged by the government.
NEWS
August 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council threatened an arms embargo against Burundi's leaders if they did not initiate all-party negotiations to end violence that many fear will escalate into widespread massacres. In a resolution adopted by a 15-0 vote, the council for the first time also condemned the July military coup led by retired Maj. Pierre Buyoya. The resolution was aimed at pressuring the military leaders into unconditional negotiations with all the country's parties and factions.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Algerian diplomat appointed as the U.N.'s special envoy to Zaire, Burundi and Rwanda said Tuesday that it may take a huge injection of Western aid--a "mini-Marshall Plan"--to halt the spiral of violence in the war-ravaged Central African nations. Mohamed Sahnoun will go to Africa next week to try to halt the bloodshed, which includes a civil war in Zaire and a cycle of attacks and reprisals by ethnic Hutus and Tutsis in Rwanda and Burundi.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Algerian diplomat appointed as the U.N.'s special envoy to Zaire, Burundi and Rwanda said Tuesday that it may take a huge injection of Western aid--a "mini-Marshall Plan"--to halt the spiral of violence in the war-ravaged Central African nations. Mohamed Sahnoun will go to Africa next week to try to halt the bloodshed, which includes a civil war in Zaire and a cycle of attacks and reprisals by ethnic Hutus and Tutsis in Rwanda and Burundi.
NEWS
August 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council threatened an arms embargo against Burundi's leaders if they did not initiate all-party negotiations to end violence that many fear will escalate into widespread massacres. In a resolution adopted by a 15-0 vote, the council for the first time also condemned the July military coup led by retired Maj. Pierre Buyoya. The resolution was aimed at pressuring the military leaders into unconditional negotiations with all the country's parties and factions.
NEWS
January 3, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Warning that ethnic tensions in Burundi could explode into "violence on a massive scale," the U.N. chief is urging the Security Council to prepare a force that could intervene in the Central African country. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali is unlikely to find support in the council, especially since both the Security Council and Burundi's government rejected a similar proposal in 1994 after more than 500,000 people were massacred in neighboring Rwanda.
NEWS
June 10, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United Nations called for investigations by Burundi's government into a massacre of Hutu civilians by mainly Tutsi troops. U.N. special envoy Ahmedou Ould Abdullah and the U.S. Embassy appealed for the government to establish a commission of inquiry into Wednesday's violence and to publish the results.
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