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NEWS
February 9, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Central American foreign ministers urged the United Nations on Wednesday to dispatch highly mobile international peacekeepers from West Germany, Spain and Canada to police the security provisions of the long-stalled 1987 regional peace plan. The agreement among the five foreign ministers--representing Nicaragua, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Guatemala and Honduras--was hammered out during a daylong meeting at the United Nations. U.N.
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NEWS
April 23, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A contingent of 193 Venezuelan soldiers, part of a U.N. peacekeeping operation, arrived in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, en route to Nicaragua, where they are to oversee the disarming of U.S.-backed Contra rebels by June 10. In addition, another 125 Venezuelan troops already in Honduras were traveling overland to northern Nicaragua to join in the effort, said Spanish Gen. Agustin Quesada, head of the U.N. force.
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NEWS
July 28, 1989
The U.N. Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution designed to boost the peace process in Central America and called for an end to the conflict between the U.S.-backed Contras and the Nicaraguan government. Washington supported the resolution and voiced strong support for Nicaragua's plans to hold elections next year.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first members of an unarmed U.N. peacekeeping force have arrived in Central America as fighting continues to rage and the region's presidents prepare for further peace talks. The U.N. force, which eventually is to consist of about 260 military observers, is to monitor accords calling for the end of assistance by regional governments to "irregular" forces operating in the region. Among the first arrivals were officers from Spain, Venezuela, Ireland and Canada.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar proposed sending 625 military and civilian personnel to Central America in the first major U.N. peacekeeping operation in the Western Hemisphere. However, State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler hinted at U.S. concerns about the plans and refused to say whether Washington would support it or exercise its Security Council veto to squash the proposal.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
Officials of five Central American nations Wednesday endorsed a plan to send U.N. peacekeepers to the region to ensure that guerrillas don't launch cross-border raids. The plan, which needs U.N. approval, calls for up to 100 military observers to monitor Central American border areas.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The United Nations Security Council on Tuesday unanimously approved the creation of a multinational peacekeeping force in Central America, the first major U.N. operation in the Western Hemisphere. The United States voted in favor of the force, to be known as ONUCA, which grew from a regional peace accord signed in May at Tela, Honduras, by the presidents of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first members of an unarmed U.N. peacekeeping force have arrived in Central America as fighting continues to rage and the region's presidents prepare for further peace talks. The U.N. force, which eventually is to consist of about 260 military observers, is to monitor accords calling for the end of assistance by regional governments to "irregular" forces operating in the region. Among the first arrivals were officers from Spain, Venezuela, Ireland and Canada.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A contingent of 193 Venezuelan soldiers, part of a U.N. peacekeeping operation, arrived in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, en route to Nicaragua, where they are to oversee the disarming of U.S.-backed Contra rebels by June 10. In addition, another 125 Venezuelan troops already in Honduras were traveling overland to northern Nicaragua to join in the effort, said Spanish Gen. Agustin Quesada, head of the U.N. force.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
The United Nations Security Council on Tuesday unanimously approved the creation of a multinational peacekeeping force in Central America, the first major U.N. operation in the Western Hemisphere. The United States voted in favor of the force, to be known as ONUCA, which grew from a regional peace accord signed in May at Tela, Honduras, by the presidents of Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica.
NEWS
October 13, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar proposed sending 625 military and civilian personnel to Central America in the first major U.N. peacekeeping operation in the Western Hemisphere. However, State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler hinted at U.S. concerns about the plans and refused to say whether Washington would support it or exercise its Security Council veto to squash the proposal.
NEWS
July 28, 1989
The U.N. Security Council unanimously adopted a resolution designed to boost the peace process in Central America and called for an end to the conflict between the U.S.-backed Contras and the Nicaraguan government. Washington supported the resolution and voiced strong support for Nicaragua's plans to hold elections next year.
NEWS
March 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
Officials of five Central American nations Wednesday endorsed a plan to send U.N. peacekeepers to the region to ensure that guerrillas don't launch cross-border raids. The plan, which needs U.N. approval, calls for up to 100 military observers to monitor Central American border areas.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Central American foreign ministers urged the United Nations on Wednesday to dispatch highly mobile international peacekeepers from West Germany, Spain and Canada to police the security provisions of the long-stalled 1987 regional peace plan. The agreement among the five foreign ministers--representing Nicaragua, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Guatemala and Honduras--was hammered out during a daylong meeting at the United Nations. U.N.
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