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NEWS
October 23, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council voted Friday to send a 6,000-member force to Sierra Leone to help restore peace after an eight-year civil war in the African nation. On Monday, the U.N. is expected to approve sending 10,000 troops and police officers to East Timor to take over peacekeeping duties from an Australian-led multinational force. Combined, the two new forces will double the number of U.N. peacekeepers deployed globally, and plans are underway to send as many as 20,000 peacekeepers to Congo.
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OPINION
January 29, 2010
The United Nations peacekeeping mission in Congo is close to losing all credibility. On its 10-year watch, millions of Congolese have been killed or displaced, raped or forced to toil in mines for precious minerals. The U.N. troops, known as MONUC, certainly are not to blame for those atrocities or for the country's civil strife -- rebels from neighboring Rwanda are mostly at fault. But Congolese soldiers fighting the Democratic Liberation Forces of Rwanda, or FDLR, also have been accused of persecuting civilians, and they, unlike the rebels, have had the logistical support of troops provided by the U.N. Sent to the Democratic Republic of Congo at the end of the 1990s, the peacekeepers provide fuel and food, medical aid, transportation and firepower to help government troops retake areas controlled by the FDLR.
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NEWS
February 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
Taking advantage of new momentum in Congo's peace process, the Security Council set a new timetable Thursday for the warring sides to pull back troops and for U.N. observers to verify their departure. Diplomats and U.N. officials hailed the resolution as a breakthrough in the drawn-out Congolese conflict, which has engulfed six African nations. But they acknowledged that it marked only one step toward ending the 2-year-old war.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Uruguayan soldiers arrived in Congo on Thursday, the first members of a multinational force sent to bolster a shaky agreement to end a civil war that has racked Africa's third-largest nation. The 110 South Americans were the first of 2,500 armed U.N. troops sent to help bring an end to the conflict that erupted when rebels took up arms to oust the late President Laurent Kabila in 1998. Five other African nations became embroiled in the 2 1/2-year war.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Uruguayan soldiers arrived in Congo on Thursday, the first members of a multinational force sent to bolster a shaky agreement to end a civil war that has racked Africa's third-largest nation. The 110 South Americans were the first of 2,500 armed U.N. troops sent to help bring an end to the conflict that erupted when rebels took up arms to oust the late President Laurent Kabila in 1998. Five other African nations became embroiled in the 2 1/2-year war.
NEWS
April 16, 1998 | Associated Press
Citing a lack of cooperation from Congo's government, Secretary-General Kofi Annan has decided to withdraw a U.N. team sent to the African country to investigate massacres, a senior U.N. official said Wednesday. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the announcement will probably be made today or Friday, even though Annan was under pressure from the United States to keep the team in Congo.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Laurent Kabila's government alleged that the leader of a U.N. team sent to investigate alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees was biased, threatening to scuttle the probe for the third time. The team leader, former Togolese Chief Justice Atsu-Koffi Amega, said hours earlier that the Congolese government had raised new issues that he declined to identify and that he said threatened to derail the investigation.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Stalled for months by government resistance, a U.N. team arrived to investigate alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees by President Laurent Kabila's soldiers. The probe will be a watered-down version of the one originally envisioned when reports of atrocities by Kabila's army first emerged. The U.N. was forced to name a new team leader and change the investigators' mandate to win Kabila's cooperation.
NEWS
July 1, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations human rights team called for an international tribunal to try Congolese and others for "serious violations of human rights." The team's report, released in New York, cited a "total absence of cooperation" from President Laurent Kabila's government in investigating massacres of Rwandan Hutu refugees before Kabila took power in 1997. The team was withdrawn from Congo in April.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decision to pull back a U.N. team investigating the massacre of refugees in Congo--after the government there refused to cooperate with it--has delivered a setback to the Clinton administration's Africa policy and to U.N. efforts to put human rights at the center of the international agenda. The Congolese obstruction of the investigation came despite the efforts of Bill Richardson, the globe-trotting U.S. ambassador to the U.N.
NEWS
February 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
Taking advantage of new momentum in Congo's peace process, the Security Council set a new timetable Thursday for the warring sides to pull back troops and for U.N. observers to verify their departure. Diplomats and U.N. officials hailed the resolution as a breakthrough in the drawn-out Congolese conflict, which has engulfed six African nations. But they acknowledged that it marked only one step toward ending the 2-year-old war.
NEWS
October 23, 1999 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.N. Security Council voted Friday to send a 6,000-member force to Sierra Leone to help restore peace after an eight-year civil war in the African nation. On Monday, the U.N. is expected to approve sending 10,000 troops and police officers to East Timor to take over peacekeeping duties from an Australian-led multinational force. Combined, the two new forces will double the number of U.N. peacekeepers deployed globally, and plans are underway to send as many as 20,000 peacekeepers to Congo.
NEWS
July 1, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations human rights team called for an international tribunal to try Congolese and others for "serious violations of human rights." The team's report, released in New York, cited a "total absence of cooperation" from President Laurent Kabila's government in investigating massacres of Rwandan Hutu refugees before Kabila took power in 1997. The team was withdrawn from Congo in April.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The decision to pull back a U.N. team investigating the massacre of refugees in Congo--after the government there refused to cooperate with it--has delivered a setback to the Clinton administration's Africa policy and to U.N. efforts to put human rights at the center of the international agenda. The Congolese obstruction of the investigation came despite the efforts of Bill Richardson, the globe-trotting U.S. ambassador to the U.N.
NEWS
April 16, 1998 | Associated Press
Citing a lack of cooperation from Congo's government, Secretary-General Kofi Annan has decided to withdraw a U.N. team sent to the African country to investigate massacres, a senior U.N. official said Wednesday. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said the announcement will probably be made today or Friday, even though Annan was under pressure from the United States to keep the team in Congo.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Laurent Kabila's government alleged that the leader of a U.N. team sent to investigate alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees was biased, threatening to scuttle the probe for the third time. The team leader, former Togolese Chief Justice Atsu-Koffi Amega, said hours earlier that the Congolese government had raised new issues that he declined to identify and that he said threatened to derail the investigation.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Laurent Kabila agreed Saturday to cooperate with a U.N. investigation into reported massacres and other human rights abuses in refugee camps in this Central African nation, U.N. Ambassador Bill Richardson announced after meeting with the new leader. Richardson, the U.S. envoy to the United Nations, said a U.N. advance team will arrive in the country within two weeks and a formal investigative commission will begin work in early July.
OPINION
January 29, 2010
The United Nations peacekeeping mission in Congo is close to losing all credibility. On its 10-year watch, millions of Congolese have been killed or displaced, raped or forced to toil in mines for precious minerals. The U.N. troops, known as MONUC, certainly are not to blame for those atrocities or for the country's civil strife -- rebels from neighboring Rwanda are mostly at fault. But Congolese soldiers fighting the Democratic Liberation Forces of Rwanda, or FDLR, also have been accused of persecuting civilians, and they, unlike the rebels, have had the logistical support of troops provided by the U.N. Sent to the Democratic Republic of Congo at the end of the 1990s, the peacekeepers provide fuel and food, medical aid, transportation and firepower to help government troops retake areas controlled by the FDLR.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Stalled for months by government resistance, a U.N. team arrived to investigate alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees by President Laurent Kabila's soldiers. The probe will be a watered-down version of the one originally envisioned when reports of atrocities by Kabila's army first emerged. The U.N. was forced to name a new team leader and change the investigators' mandate to win Kabila's cooperation.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Laurent Kabila agreed Saturday to cooperate with a U.N. investigation into reported massacres and other human rights abuses in refugee camps in this Central African nation, U.N. Ambassador Bill Richardson announced after meeting with the new leader. Richardson, the U.S. envoy to the United Nations, said a U.N. advance team will arrive in the country within two weeks and a formal investigative commission will begin work in early July.
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