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NEWS
February 26, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dragica Hodak pointed through the laundry hanging on the barren balcony of a three-room apartment that she and her family occupy as refugees. "They are very close," she said of the enemy, speaking carefully so her 4-year-old son would not detect the alarm in her voice. "You can almost see the shelling from this window." The specter of Croatia returning to war haunts towns like this and people like Hodak.
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NEWS
July 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
The U.N. war crimes tribunal announced Thursday that it has indicted a Croatian general, the second one in as many days. Both men are considered heroes in Croatia for defending the country during a war with Serbs in the early 1990s. As the arrest warrant for retired Gen. Ante Gotovina was being unsealed, Gen. Rahim Ademi pleaded innocent to charges of crimes against humanity.
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NEWS
May 9, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an organized drive to ensure Serbia's hold on territory seized from Croatia, Serbian gunmen have been rounding up Croats, Slovaks and Hungarians at night, forcing them to sign over all property and dumping them in a dangerous no man's land to make their way across minefields in the dark. U.N. officials report at least 400 cases of forced expulsions from Serbian-held eastern Croatia last month, including some in which U.N. troops were enlisted as accomplices.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Croatian government met in an emergency session on how to deal with the first indictments from a U.N. war crimes tribunal, disclosed Friday, against its citizens for wartime atrocities against Serbs. There is little alternative for Prime Minister Ivica Racan but to act on the indictments, which call for the extradition of the suspects for trial at The Hague, or brace for international isolation, perhaps even sanctions.
NEWS
January 31, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an urgent attempt to avoid another war in the Balkans, the United States and its allies unveiled an autonomy plan Monday for Croatian Serbs whose 10-month-old cease-fire with the Zagreb government is in danger of collapsing. But, handing a stunning rebuke to the international envoys who drafted the plan, the Serbs refused to even look at the 42-page document. "This is something that makes the situation in Croatia much more dangerous," Peter Galbraith, the U.S.
NEWS
July 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Croatian government met in an emergency session on how to deal with the first indictments from a U.N. war crimes tribunal, disclosed Friday, against its citizens for wartime atrocities against Serbs. There is little alternative for Prime Minister Ivica Racan but to act on the indictments, which call for the extradition of the suspects for trial at The Hague, or brace for international isolation, perhaps even sanctions.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Franjo Tudjman's decision to allow U.N. peacekeepers to remain in his country will probably prevent a new round of fighting in Croatia, Western diplomats and analysts said Monday. But there is only faint hope that the move will lead to a lasting peace with this country's rebellious Serbs, who have controlled one-third of Croatian territory in a yearlong cease-fire. "All we have is a temporary respite," said Col.
NEWS
March 10, 1995 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration said Thursday that it is making progress in trying to persuade Croatian President Franjo Tudjman to rescind his order requiring United Nations forces to leave his country after March 31, but it declined to provide details. In testimony before Congress, Assistant Secretary of State Richard C. Holbrooke said he has just completed the first round of "a very intense dialogue" with the Croatians and plans to return to Zagreb this weekend.
NEWS
June 22, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In between the fierce squalls that usher in the Balkan summer, builders under contract to U.N. peacekeepers have been pouring cement and hammering arches for twin porticoes of faux Ionic columns outside the two most important doors at mission headquarters. The embellished entrances, about 100 feet apart on Building A, lead to the offices of the U.N. mission chief, Yasushi Akashi, and to an administrative beehive that has swelled since his January arrival.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In war zones like this central Croatian city, blasted to ruins by months of battle, U.N. truce monitors who began arriving on Tuesday face a nearly impossible mission to restore peace. Despite a cease-fire that officials contend has been holding for 11 days, two local civilians were killed, two Croatian national guardsmen were wounded and two others were missing and believed kidnaped after an overnight battle.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | Reuters
A United Nations general has released a detailed report of Croatian atrocities against Serbs in Croatia's Krajina region and blamed the Croatian government for failing to prevent a "scorched-earth campaign." Brig. Gen. Alain Forand of Canada gave details of murders of elderly civilians, looting and house burning in a departure statement as he ended his mission as head of a U.N. peacekeeping contingent in the area.
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They found Sava Babic's body in the back of her broken-down yellow Fiat, her legs and a walking cane protruding from a rear door. The 82-year-old Serbian woman had been shot in the cheek. She was discovered by the same team of U.N. civilian police officers who had visited her three days earlier and had heard her complaints about Croatian soldiers trying to steal her car. The U.N. officers were bringing food to Babic when they found her.
NEWS
August 11, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY and TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United Nations moved Thursday to strengthen its presence along a 160-mile route through Croatia to thwart brutal attacks by vengeful Croats against Serb refugees fleeing the country. At least two people have been killed and hundreds of others--including a carload of Serbian Orthodox nuns--injured since Wednesday, when the Croatian army began evacuating thousands of Croatian Serbs trapped by fighting near the town of Topusko, according to U.N. and witness accounts.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
War reached this European capital Tuesday as rebel Serbs bombarded the heart of Zagreb in deadly revenge for a fierce Croatian army offensive that was swiftly driving Serbs from a four-year stronghold. The Croatian government late Tuesday said it had successfully recaptured part of the land seized by rebel Serb separatists in their 1991 war of secession. But earlier, Serb rocket attacks on the capital killed five people, wounded 120 and sowed terror in a city that had believed itself safe.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Croats reacted with disappointment Saturday to the new U.N. peacekeeping mandate for their country, suggesting that the United Nations will have to be content with merely deferring violence in Croatia in the coming months. The higher goal of political re-integration seems too much to ask. "This U.N. resolution is garbage," complained Josip Popovic, a 60-year-old mechanical engineer who was spending the first afternoon of the new U.N. mandate at a cafe in Zagreb's downtown square.
NEWS
March 25, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to pull the Croats and Serbs back from what he called "the brink of a major war," U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali proposed Friday that the Security Council approve the broad outlines of a reduced and revised peacekeeping mission in Croatia--leaving the details for him to negotiate later. The United States and four allies--Russia, Germany, Britain and France--quickly circulated a series of draft resolutions that would divide the current U.N.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Croatian President Franjo Tudjman backed a six-week extension of a U.N. mandate in Croatia to give negotiators time to thrash out a plan to return Serb-held areas to Zagreb's control. Tudjman said that as a goodwill gesture he was prepared to pull back his troops to a line six miles from areas of Croatia captured by Serb rebels in the 1991 independence war and now protected by U.N. peacekeepers. The peacekeepers' mandate is due to run out next Sunday.
NEWS
January 23, 1993 | LAURA SILBER and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Croatian troops surged across a U.N.-monitored cease-fire line Friday to seize a strategic route to the Adriatic Sea that had been blocked by Serbian rebels for more than a year. The Croatian offensive, quickly condemned by the Security Council, posed the most serious threat to a U.N. peacekeeping mission in Croatia since foreign troops were deployed last April to separate warring Serbian and Croatian militias.
NEWS
March 15, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Croatian President Franjo Tudjman is expected to meet Thursday with President Clinton and later in the week with U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali to work out details of a continued U.N. troop deployment in Croatia. The high-profile U.S. visit is seen as a pay-back to Tudjman for reversing his decision to expel 12,000 U.N. peacekeepers in his country, thereby averting a new round of fighting between Croats and rebel Serbs.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Franjo Tudjman's decision to allow U.N. peacekeepers to remain in his country will probably prevent a new round of fighting in Croatia, Western diplomats and analysts said Monday. But there is only faint hope that the move will lead to a lasting peace with this country's rebellious Serbs, who have controlled one-third of Croatian territory in a yearlong cease-fire. "All we have is a temporary respite," said Col.
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