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United Nations Croatia

NEWS
July 27, 2001 | From Associated Press
The U.N. war crimes tribunal announced Thursday that it has indicted a Croatian general, the second one in as many days. Both men are considered heroes in Croatia for defending the country during a war with Serbs in the early 1990s. As the arrest warrant for retired Gen. Ante Gotovina was being unsealed, Gen. Rahim Ademi pleaded innocent to charges of crimes against humanity.
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NEWS
July 16, 1993 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Serbian militants in the occupied Krajina region Thursday launched their most punishing assault in Croatia since late 1991, blasting more than 70 shells into this front-line city and threatening to attack the nearby capital of Zagreb with Scud-type missiles. U.N.
NEWS
November 30, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what appeared to be conciliatory moves to secure a U.N. peacekeeping mission, the Serbian-led federal army Friday began pulling out of two bases near Zagreb, and Croatia's president conceded that U.N. troops should be allowed to patrol his republic's war zones. Both gestures raised hopes that conditions might be created for foreign intervention to halt the Yugoslav civil war, which has taken at least 7,000 lives in five months.
NEWS
August 25, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali on Thursday proposed the withdrawal of most international peacekeepers from Croatia now that victorious Croatian troops have frightened hordes of Serbs into fleeing disputed territory once patrolled by the United Nations. In a report to the Security Council, he recommended keeping just two battalions of U.N. troops in the tense area of Eastern Slavonia, the major remaining Serb-controlled territory in Croatia.
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | Reuters
A United Nations general has released a detailed report of Croatian atrocities against Serbs in Croatia's Krajina region and blamed the Croatian government for failing to prevent a "scorched-earth campaign." Brig. Gen. Alain Forand of Canada gave details of murders of elderly civilians, looting and house burning in a departure statement as he ended his mission as head of a U.N. peacekeeping contingent in the area.
NEWS
October 9, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They found Sava Babic's body in the back of her broken-down yellow Fiat, her legs and a walking cane protruding from a rear door. The 82-year-old Serbian woman had been shot in the cheek. She was discovered by the same team of U.N. civilian police officers who had visited her three days earlier and had heard her complaints about Croatian soldiers trying to steal her car. The U.N. officers were bringing food to Babic when they found her.
NEWS
February 24, 1995 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite diplomatic pressure, Croatian President Franjo Tudjman is refusing to back away from his decision to expel U.N. peacekeepers from his country next month. The move is part of a high-risk strategy to regain Croatian territory lost to Serbian forces more than three years ago.
NEWS
November 24, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It took the U.S. Army only five days to erect a sprawling field hospital at Zagreb Airport, yet before the soldiers could change from coveralls to scrubs, they were confronted with their first emergency. A Croatian bulldozer driver working under contract with the Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, or M.A.S.H., stumbled over a land mine buried by the Yugoslav People's Army when it beat a hasty retreat from the Croatian capital more than a year ago.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When he dispatched troops into the Serb-held enclave of Western Slavonia, Croatian President Franjo Tudjman hit at the one military target he knew he could grab. But the wrathful reply from his Serb enemies has exacted an unexpectedly grim toll and pushed this bloodied region to the brink of an even wider war. For the second day Wednesday, rebel Serbs attacked Zagreb with shrapnel-spewing missiles that hit the capital city's main children's hospital and the National Theater.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Croatian President Franjo Tudjman announced Sunday that he will allow a limited number of U.N. peacekeepers to remain in his country, reversing a stance that had raised fears that the Balkan nation would slip back into civil war. "We have arrived at a new solution," Tudjman said at a joint news conference with Vice President Al Gore at the U.N. World Summit for Social Development, a huge anti-poverty gathering that had been meeting here for the past week.
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