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NEWS
October 1, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For one week this summer, globe-trotter Noel Irwin-Hentschel experienced the flip side of Mexico: No lounging on sun-drenched beaches, no room service at a posh hotel. Just the friendship of the people of Tempoal, a rural village in the state of Veracruz where the women learned for the first time how to use mechanized corn grinders and make water pumps at a factory.
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TRAVEL
October 23, 2005 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
RESEARCHING a recent Her World column on traveling in places struggling with poverty, I discovered Global Exchange Reality Tours, a San Francisco company that tries to expose travelers to the daily lives of people in the developing world. Director Malia Everette told me that visitors from wealthy places, including North America, are often deeply moved when they meet the poorest of the poor and that they begin to understand their struggles.
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TRAVEL
October 23, 2005 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
RESEARCHING a recent Her World column on traveling in places struggling with poverty, I discovered Global Exchange Reality Tours, a San Francisco company that tries to expose travelers to the daily lives of people in the developing world. Director Malia Everette told me that visitors from wealthy places, including North America, are often deeply moved when they meet the poorest of the poor and that they begin to understand their struggles.
NEWS
October 1, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For one week this summer, globe-trotter Noel Irwin-Hentschel experienced the flip side of Mexico: No lounging on sun-drenched beaches, no room service at a posh hotel. Just the friendship of the people of Tempoal, a rural village in the state of Veracruz where the women learned for the first time how to use mechanized corn grinders and make water pumps at a factory.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Women's Work: Vanna White is going to keep turning those letters on "Wheel of Fortune" under a new three-year contract with the top-rated game show. . . . Julie Andrews is scheduled to be in New York today to be named good-will ambassador for the United Nations Development Fund for Women. She'll get her diplomatic passport at a special ceremony at UN headquarters. . . . Audrey Hepburn will be honorary chair of the American Cinematheque's seventh Moving Picture Ball on May 8 at the Century Plaza.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Nicole Kidman accepted damages from England's Daily Telegraph newspaper Friday for falsely reporting that she had breached the terms of her promotional contract for Chanel No. 5 perfume. Details of the settlement weren't disclosed, and the 40-year-old actress wasn't in court. Her lawyer, John Kelly, said Kidman suffered considerable embarrassment and distress over the report.
WORLD
April 5, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
President Hamid Karzai said he had ordered a review of a new law that critics say makes it legal for men to rape their wives, responding to criticism from around the world that included sharp comments from President Obama. The law is intended to regulate family life inside Afghanistan's Shiite community, which makes up about 10% of the country's 30 million people. Under one article, Shiite husbands are given the right to demand sex every fourth night unless the wife is ill. The United Nations Development Fund for Women has said the law "legalizes the rape of a wife by her husband."
WORLD
April 3, 2009 | Associated Press
Human rights groups and some Afghan lawmakers criticized President Hamid Karzai on Thursday for signing into law legislation that some believe legalizes the rape of a wife by her husband and prevents women from leaving the house without a man's permission. Critics say the law undermines hard-won rights for women enacted after the fall of the Taliban regime.
OPINION
August 13, 2009
Rape is one of the oldest weapons of war, but until recently it was treated much like looting, as regrettable collateral damage rather than as a war crime. That may be because most victims are women, often second-class citizens in their societies. It may be that rape is overshadowed by massacres, although sexual assault often leads to death. Or perhaps it is because victors and vanquished alike commit rape. Hitler's army engaged in sexual violence, and as many as 2 million German women were abused by conquering Soviet troops after World War II. The Nuremberg tribunal did not prosecute sexual crimes.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
When Macy's decided to sell baskets made by Rwandan widows, the store was swayed in part by the prospect of contributing to a developing economy and in part by the women's tales of suffering during their country's 1994 genocide. But Macy's was clear: This may have been charitable, but it was not charity. Baskets, woven from sisal and sweet grass, are inspected to verify they meet quality requirements and then paid for in cash on the spot.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This year's Grammy nominees in the best world music album category are a curiously diverse collection: the Chieftains, an Irish group; banjo player Bela Fleck (with V.M. Bhatt and Jie-Bing Chen); the Gipsy Kings; Indian classical sarodist Ali Akbar Khan; Pakistani qwaali singer Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan (with Michael Brook); and jazz keyboard player-composer Joe Zawinul.
WORLD
July 12, 2004 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
As 17,000 scientists, politicians and activists gathered here Sunday for the world's largest AIDS conference, officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were preparing to recommend that all pregnant women entering labor receive a rapid HIV test if their viral status was unknown. The agency already calls for routine testing of women early in their pregnancies to block transmission of human immunodeficiency virus to their unborn babies.
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